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Jets Q&A: Disappointment Peyton was pulled?

Sure, the Jets benefited when Colts coach Jim Caldwell pulled the plug on a competitive game with 5:36 left in the third quarter and Indianapolis leading 15-10. But as weird as it sounds, were any of the players disappointed that they didn't get a crack at the Colts' starters for the entire game?

"Personally, I want to play against the best. That's what I want to compete against," said Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis, who was matched up with Reggie Wayne before Wayne got yanked in the third.

"I want to knock off the best. It was just a situation where their organization wanted to pull those guys out to save them for the playoffs, which is smart on their part. But I was just a little upset that I didn't get to compete the whole game against Peyton Manning and Reggie Wayne. That's just something that didn't happen today. First half it did, but second half it just didn't happen."

So with that in mind, what was the feeling that engulfed Revis when he saw Curtis Painter jog onto the field?

"First, I was upset, because Peyton was out of the game, and Reggie," Revis said. "Second, that's football. You have to go with it and you've got to take advantage of it. This is a situation where we had to take advantage of Painter coming in and we did - got the touchdown, the strip fumble. He's a backup. He didn't seem in sync and he didn't know the offense as much as Peyton. I think he was just kind of confused with our defense, him just stepping in like that."

Did the Jets switch things up a bit defensively against Painter because they knew they could get to him more easily?

"We played some of the same calls, but we were able to get there, put some pressure on that young man," Rex Ryan said. "Again, the plan did change a little bit. Reggie Wayne wasn't in there, so we were able to match Revis the other side. But that's just it. We were playing football."

Bart Scott was flagged for tripping on the Colts' second series, helping Indianapolis convert a fourth-and-1. What did Scott have to say about the penalty, especially given that the Colts scored a touchdown two plays later?

"I was just trying to stand up. I slipped," Scott said. "It's one of those things where 'did my leg run into him or did he run into my leg?' I didn't stick it out there. It's one of those things, man. The ref [Terry McAulay] was like, 'Well, we got in trouble a couple of weeks ago, so we had to call it.' I'm like, 'Man, I didn't trip the dude, the dude hit me in my groin.' ''

Seems as if Shonn Greene had more of a role in the offense than he has had of late. Was I hallucinating or was he a big part of the game plan?

No, you were lucid. Greene ran for 95 yards on 16 attempts, averaging nearly 6 yards a carry. With the Colts' high-powered offense, the Jets knew they were going to have to play a ball-control type of game to stay in it with Indianapolis. So that meant a heavy dose of Thomas Jones and the rookie running back.

"My running backs coach, Anthony Lynn, he basically told me that I was going to be more in the rotation," Greene said. "I prepare every week like I'm going to get the ball a lot. It really didn't matter to me because I was going in prepared. My thing is, I just want to be on the field to be able to help the team. Having a game like this, me and T.J. did very well. With both of us going, it just gives the team that much more of a chance to get a win."

What happened on those two plays in which Dwight Freeney, of all people, came in unblocked and nearly pulverized quarterback Mark Sanchez?

Neither was the fault of left tackle D'Brickashaw Ferguson, though it might have appeared that way. Ferguson was supposed to give help by pinching inside, and Sanchez's responsibility was to get rid of the ball quickly.

"It was empty alignment," Ryan said. "We spread everybody out and they went to a zero blitz where somebody is going to be unblocked. Generally, you protect inside out, and we did that. But Freeney got there quick before we were able to recognize the hot [read] and get the throw off."

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