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Jason Day makes adventurous par on second hole

Jason Day, of Australia, smiles has he walks

Jason Day, of Australia, smiles has he walks off the second green during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at Valhalla Golf Club on Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Louisville, Ky. Credit: AP / Jeff Roberson

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Jason Day is the type to jump into the heart of competition with both feet. Shoes optional.

His par 4 on No. 2 Saturday was the high-water mark of an eventful day at the PGA Championship because he took off his shoes and socks, rolled up his pants above his knees, crossed over a creek and hit his ball out of thick vegetation.

Day's day was off to a shaky start because his tee shot went far left, clearing Floyd's Fork, the creek that meanders through Valhalla Golf Club. It is so far out of play that there is no bridge to where his ball landed. His caddie waded across and found it (in a search aided by CBS personality David Feherty). Day followed, without his footwear or clubs.

Standing near his ball, the Australian asked for a club. "Throw me a wedge, mate," he asked his caddie, but didn't ask for the shoes.

"I was too lazy," he said. "I was like, 'We're going to be behind, way behind, so I may as well just hit it with no shoes on.' "

He lashed the wedge back in play, hit his third to 10 feet and made the putt. "It was a great 4 there, a lucky 4," he said.

Rory McIlroy, playing with Day in the final group, said, "I was like, 'Well, it's a water hazard anyway, just take a drop.' That would have been what I would have done, and I would have made a 5 or 6. He made a 4. It was a good effort. I wouldn't have been walking through that river to get my ball, that's for sure. You don't know what's in there."

Wiesberger's a skier

Bernd Wiesberger of Austria, who is in second, knows famous countryman Franz Klammer and is himself a skier. He considers himself a high single-digit handicap at it. "I'm decent," he said. "I'm not going to fall unless somebody runs me over."

New York Sports