TODAY'S PAPER
Good Afternoon
Good Afternoon
SportsMedia

Alex Rodriguez explains why Houston Astros players are receiving such vitriol

Alex Rodriguez during the AL Wild Card Game

Alex Rodriguez during the AL Wild Card Game at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on Oct. 2, 2019. Credit: ESPN Images/Scott Clarke

Alex Rodriguez, who in 2013 received the longest suspension in baseball history, had plenty to say Tuesday about the lack of remorse from Astros players who did not receive suspensions following the club’s sign-stealing scandal.

On Tuesday’s broadcast of the Yankees-Red Sox spring training matchup on ESPN, the former Yankees slugger said people wanted a true apology from the Astros, and that without doing so the players have earned any bad attention or player vitriol they receive.

“I think the one thing that really has upset the fans is you cheat, you win a championship, there is no suspension, and then there’s no remorse,” said Rodriguez. “The last one I think is probably the worst one because people want to see remorse. They want a real, authentic apology. And they have not received that thus far.”

Discussing the Astros with his Sunday Night Baseball partner, Matt Vasgersian, Rodriguez connected the situation to his own following his 211-game suspension, later reduced to 162 games for the entire 2014 season, for violating baseball’s rules against performance enhancing drugs.

“I can just tell you this, Matty, from a guy who has made as many mistakes as anybody on the biggest stage — I served the longest suspension in Major League Baseball history, it cost me well over $35 million, and you know what? I deserved that. And as a result, I came back. I owned it after acting like a buffoon for a long time. I had my apologies, and then I went dark. I wanted my next move to be contrite, but I also wanted to go out and play good baseball and change my narrative. And the way you change your narrative is you have to be accountable. You’ve earned all this negative talk. You’ve earned whatever comes your way, including whether it’s hit by a pitch or negative press. You have divorced yourself from having the ability to protect yourself.”

New York Sports