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New landmark buildings in NYC

41 COOPER SQUARE (designed by Morphosis): Thom Mayne,

41 COOPER SQUARE (designed by Morphosis): Thom Mayne, founder of the Los Angeles-based firm Morphosis, certainly went out on a limb with this hulking, torquing academic building for Cooper Union. It's enclosed in a perforated steel mesh and marked by a large "rip" in the facade. It may seem an aggressive gesture, but you can't help but engage with it; inside, the building is organized around a central staircase, providing unity and a sense of stately progression. (Sept. 12, 2013) Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

Old landmarks, such as the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building, will always deserve our affection, but there are much newer structures that we can appreciate as we make our way around New York today. These five examples of contemporary architecture, all constructed in the past five years, deserve a lingering look. --TED LOOS, Special to Newsday

HOTEL AMERICANO, 518 W. 27th St. (designed by
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

HOTEL AMERICANO, 518 W. 27th St. (designed by Ten Arquitectos): Enrique Norten, the principal of the Mexico City-based firm, designed this chic little hotel in West Chelsea with an eye to screening out the quickly gentrifying neighborhood -- literally, with a steel mesh screen set slightly off the actual structure. Inside, the spaces are light and airy, making you feel like you're not in New York. Experience the vibe yourself by booking a table at the outdoor rooftop grill (212-525-0000, hotel-americano.com). (Sept. 12, 2013)

The lobby at The Hotel Americano, 518 W.
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The lobby at The Hotel Americano, 518 W. 27th St. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The cafe at the Hotel Americano, 518 W.
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The cafe at the Hotel Americano, 518 W. 27th St. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The rooftop grill at The Hotel Americano, 518
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The rooftop grill at The Hotel Americano, 518 W. 27th St. (Sept. 12, 2013)

41 COOPER SQUARE (designed by Morphosis): Thom Mayne,
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

41 COOPER SQUARE (designed by Morphosis): Thom Mayne, founder of the Los Angeles-based firm Morphosis, certainly went out on a limb with this hulking, torquing academic building for Cooper Union. It's enclosed in a perforated steel mesh and marked by a large "rip" in the facade. It may seem an aggressive gesture, but you can't help but engage with it; inside, the building is organized around a central staircase, providing unity and a sense of stately progression. (Sept. 12, 2013)

41 Cooper Square is part of Cooper Union.
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

41 Cooper Square is part of Cooper Union. (Sept. 12, 2013)

THE JAMES HOTEL, 27 Grand St. (designed by
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

THE JAMES HOTEL, 27 Grand St. (designed by  ODA-Architecture): A concrete tower on stilts sounds very retro (and quite possibly forbidding) but this SoHo hotel manages to be light on its feet. NYC's ODA-Architecture came up with the right proportions and the right touches (in collaboration with Perkins Eastman Architects), like cantilevering the building over a lush garden. A concrete "halo" surrounds the pool deck on top. The ground floor features an outpost of David Burke Kitchen (212-465-2000, jameshotels.com). (Sept. 12, 2013)

The south facade of the James Hotel, 27
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The south facade of the James Hotel, 27 Grand St., in SoHo. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The top floors of the James Hotel, 27
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The top floors of the James Hotel, 27 Grand St., in SoHo. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The lobby of the James Hotel, 27 Grand
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The lobby of the James Hotel, 27 Grand St., in SoHo. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The pool deck at the James Hotel, 27
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The pool deck at the James Hotel, 27 Grand St., in SoHo. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The James Hotel, 27 Grand St., in SoHo.
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The James Hotel, 27 Grand St., in SoHo. (Sept. 12, 2013)

ALICE TULLY HALL, 1941 Broadway (designed by Diller
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

ALICE TULLY HALL, 1941 Broadway (designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro): This cutting-edge New York City firm faced a huge challenge for this Lincoln Center landmark. Lead partner Elizabeth Diller had to open up the existing, inward-turning Brutalist structure, with almost no extra space for an addition. She came up with an eye-popping glass-walled redo with a tiny extension cantilevered over Broadway. Her architecture engages the street and puts performance front and center. (Sept. 12, 2013)

Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway. (Sept. 12, 2013)
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The lobby and cafe at Alice Tully Hall
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The lobby and cafe at Alice Tully Hall at 1941 Broadway. (Sept. 12, 2013)

The lobby of Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway.
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The lobby of Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway. (Sept. 12, 2013)

Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway. (Sept. 12, 2013)
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway. (Sept. 12, 2013)

15 CENTRAL PARK WEST (designed by Robert A.M.
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

15 CENTRAL PARK WEST (designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects): This luxurious apartment building, one of the city's most expensive and sought-after, is a triumph of scale. Stern used expensive limestone and mimicked the size and features of nearby Art Deco apartment buildings for the section that's right on Central Park (at 61st Street). Then he built a separate, much taller tower section that is set back from the park across a courtyard. The eye reads the whole thing as modest when it's really not. (April 1, 2013)

The 15 Central Park West apartment building. (April
Photo Credit: Linda Rosier

The 15 Central Park West apartment building. (April 1, 2013)

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