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MoMa, Brooklyn Museum more: NYC exhibits to see this fall 

Installation view, Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion, Brooklyn Museum,

Installation view, Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion, Brooklyn Museum, July 20, 2019 through January 05, 2020. Photo Credit: Brooklyn Museum/Jonathan Dorado

Fall is New York City’s high season for art. This year, a beloved museum reopens bigger, better and with space for more masterpieces. Movies get the spotlight, along with fashion, dogs and Muppets. Renaissance masters drop in for visits, and two iconic Long Island artists are featured in major exhibitions.

MOMA REOPENS 

Millions of visitors fill MoMA every year, but since June the galleries have been empty. Check out the big reveal when the museum reopens on Oct. 21 after its expansion. There will be several new exhibits, such as African American artist Betye Saar’s one-woman show featuring deeply evocative mixed-media creations, but MoMA’s masterpieces, rearranged in new galleries, are the main draw. See works by Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock and Frida Kahlo as never before.

WHEN | WHERE Oct. 21, Museum of Modern Art, 11 W. 53rd St., Manhattan

INFO $25, free ages 15 and younger; 212-708-9400, moma.org 

TREASURES AT THREE METS 

“The Colmar Treasure” (through Jan. 12) at The Cloisters is a poignant exhibition about the extermination of a medieval Jewish community, told through jewels, manuscripts and personal items lost more than 600 years ago, miraculously rediscovered about 150 years ago. On Fifth Avenue, “The Last Knight: The Art, Armor and Ambition of Maximilian” examines the significance of European armor at the dawn of the Renaissance through the lens of the Roman emperor’s life (Oct. 7-Jan. 5). The Met Breuer retrospective “Vija Celmins” spotlights early and late dazzling and laborious observations, from galaxies to spider webs by the Sag Harbor artist (through Jan. 12).

WHERE The Metropolitan Museum of Art,1000 Fifth Ave.; The Met Breuer, 945 Madison Ave.; The Cloisters, Fort Tryon Park 

INFO Suggested admission $25, free younger than 12; 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

PIERRE CARDIN: FUTURE FASHION; REMBRANDT TO PICASSO: FIVE CENTURIES OF EUROPEAN WORKS ON PAPER; NOBODY PROMISED YOU TOMORROW: ART 50 YEARS AFTER STONEWALL 

The far-out side of couturier Pierre Cardin is on view in 170 examples of fashion, accessories and furniture designed in the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s (through Jan. 5). “Works on Paper” (through Oct. 13) includes intimate studies and rapid sketches that reveal more of an artist’s style and skill than completed paintings. They’re like glimpses of minds at work. A 50th anniversary commemoration of Stonewall presents challenging, moving and touching works by 28 LGBTQ+ artists born after the uprising (through Dec. 8).

WHERE Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Pkwy., Brooklyn

INFO Cardin: $20-$25; all others suggested $16; 718-638-500, brooklynmuseum.org

THE JIM HENSON EXHIBITION; STANLEY KUBRICK’S 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY

Muppets and puppets — 47 of them — including icons like Miss Piggy, Kermit the Frog, Rowlf, the Swedish Chef, Elmo and Big Bird are on permanent display. Completing the picture are story boards, sketches, scripts and a special feature, “Character Design for ‘The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance,’ ” about the new Netflix series with puppets, maquettes and art from Jim Henson’s Creature Shop (through Feb. 23). Later, a deep dive into Kubrick’s influential, groundbreaking 1968 film, “2001: A Space Odyssey” will be presented through screenings, costumes, photographs, props and more (Jan. 18-July 19).

WHERE Museum of the Moving Image,

36-01 35th Ave., Astoria, Queens 

INFO $15, $9 ages 3-17; 718-784-0077, movingimage.us 

ORDER AND ORNAMENT:  ROY LICHTENSTEIN’S ENTABLATURES; VIDA AMERICANA: MEXICAN MURALISTS REMAKE AMERICAN ART, 1925–1945

East End artist Lichtenstein worked with patterns, repetition and architecture to express ideas of hierarchies, Minimalism and Classicism in drawings, collages, prints and photographs in “Order and Ornament.” Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco and David Alfaro Siqueiros depicted radical social changes after Mexico’s revolution in public artworks, especially murals, but the movement was much wider. More than 200 works by 60 Mexican and American artists created to inspire pride and incite justice will be on view (Feb.-May).

WHERE The Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St., Manhattan 

INFO $25, ages 17 and younger free; 212-570-3600, whitney.org

PHOTOS: PLEASE DO NOT BEND, THE CATHERINE JOHNSON COLLECTION; MUSH! A TRIBUTE TO SLED DOGS FROM ARCTIC EXPLORATION TO THE IDITAROD

Sense a common theme? Vintage photographs (Oct. 8-Dec. 29) and mushers (Jan. 6-March 29), it’s all dogs, and all about dogs at the AKC Museum. Workers, companions and best friends are celebrated in paintings, photographs, sculptures, histories and interactive exhibits. It’s a dogged pursuit of the canine world. 

WHERE American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog, 101 Park Ave., Manhattan

INFO $15, $5 ages 11 and younger; 212-696-8360, museumofthedog.org

BERTOLDO DI GIOVANNI: THE RENAISSANCE; OF SCULPTURE IN MEDICI FLORENCE 

How did Michelangelo learn to carve so magnificently? He was a student of Bertoldo di Giovanni (ca. 1440-1491). The master sculptor and medalist — himself a student of Donatello and a favorite of Lorenzo de’ Medici — had a tremendous impact on the cultural flavor of 15th century Florence and the development of Renaissance sculpture. Virtually every extant work by Bertoldo will be on view in this first-ever show exploring his work across many media.

WHERE The Frick Collection, One E. 70th St.

INFO $22; 212-288-0700, frick.org

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