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Tallest buildings in NYC

New York City is the city of skyscrapers -- and there are more on the way. Defined by iconic Art Deco towers of the 1930s and modern glass behemoths, New York's skyline is full of history and modernity.

Take a look at the 12 tallest buildings in New York City.

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center stands at 1,776 feet,
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Spencer Platt

One World Trade Center stands at 1,776 feet, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. The 104-story building opened in October 2014 and offers 3 million square feet of rentable space. The building's observatory, which opened in 2015, rises 1,250 feet above the ground, offering sweeping views of New York City and beyond.

432 Park Ave.

The tower at 432 Park Ave. topped out
Photo Credit: CIM Group / Macklowe Properties

The tower at 432 Park Ave. topped out at 1,396 feet on Oct. 14, 2014, making it the tallest residential building in the Western Hemisphere. At that height, 432 Park Ave. is now taller than the Empire State Building and taller than One World Trade Center without its spire. The cornerstone of the city's new "Billionaire's Row," 432 Park Ave.'s most expensive apartment, one of the penthouses, was once for sale for $95 million. Currently, available apartments range in price from $17.5 million to $44.25 million.

Empire State Building

The iconic Empire State Building, located on Fifth
Photo Credit: Steven Sunshine

The iconic Empire State Building, located on Fifth Avenue between 33rd and 34th streets, is 1,250 feet high. When it was completed in 1931, the Empire State Building was the tallest building not just in New York, but in the world. It kept the title until 1973, when the World Trade Center was completed. The Empire State Building once again became the tallest building in New York on Sept. 11, 2001, when the Twin Towers fell.

Bank of America Tower

The Bank of America Tower, located on Sixth
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Don Emmert

The Bank of America Tower, located on Sixth Avenue between 42nd and 43 Streets, stands at 1,200 feet. The building earned U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Core & Shell Platinum certification as one of the world's most environmentally responsible high-rise office buildings, according to Bank of America. It was the first skyscraper to receive the designation.

Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building, located at 405 Lexington Ave.,
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Stan Honda

The Chrysler Building, located at 405 Lexington Ave., is 1,046 feet tall. When it opened in 1930, it was the tallest building in the world -- but it only had the title for 11 months, when the Empire State Building was completed. It is now the fifth tallest in New York and the ninth tallest building in the U.S.

The New York Times Building

Located on Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Don Emmert

Located on Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st Streets, The New York Times Building is 1,046 feet tall. It's the same height as the Chrysler Building, tying for fifth tallest in New York and ninth tallest in the U.S. The New York Times Building is the first high-rise curtain wall with ceramic sunscreen built in the U.S., according to The New York Times.

One57

At 1,004 feet, One57 is the sixth tallest
Photo Credit: One57

At 1,004 feet, One57 is the sixth tallest building in New York City. The 90-story building is mixed-use; the bottom 25 floors are part of the Park Hyatt hotel and the rest are residential condominiums. Since it topped out in June 2012, One57 and neighboring 432 Park Ave. have changed the skyline along Central Park South.

Four World Trade Center

Designed by Pritzker-prize winning architect Fumihiko Maki, Four
Photo Credit: Silverstein Properties

Designed by Pritzker-prize winning architect Fumihiko Maki, Four World Trade Center located at 150 Greenwich St. is 977 feet tall. The first of the new World Trade Center to be completed (and once known as "New York's most ignored skyscraper" by The New York Times), Four World Trade Center opened in November 2013.

70 Pine St.

At 952 feet, 70 Pine St. is the
Photo Credit: StreetEasy

At 952 feet, 70 Pine St. is the eighth tallest building in New York. Built in 1932, the Art Deco skyscraper was once the third tallest building in the city, behind only the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building. After decades of being shuttered, the building has been reopened with rental units ranging in price from $2,804 to $4,093 a month. The building features an artisanal coffee shop, fitness center and a full-service market.

40 Wall St.

40 Wall St., also known as The Trump
Photo Credit: Google Maps

40 Wall St., also known as The Trump Building, is 927 feet tall. When it was completed in 1930, it was the tallest building in the world (an honor soon lost to the Chrysler Building and then the Empire State Building), surpassing the Woolworth Building. In the 1980s, 40 Wall St. was one of the properties secretly purchased by Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos, and a court battle over ownership lasted for years after his ouster. Donald Trump bought the skyscraper at a famously low price in 1995 after it had fallen into disrepair. He put a reported $35 million into repairs and renamed it The Trump Building.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place became the 10th tallest building
Photo Credit: 30 Park Place

30 Park Place became the 10th tallest building in New York City when it was topped out in March, 2015. Towering at 926 feet, the building plays host to both a Four Seasons hotel and private residences. Located in TriBeCa, it is the tallest downtown residential tower, according to the building's website. The building, owned by Silverstein Properties and designed by Robert A.M. Stern, offers sweeping views of New York City and ample amenities for its guests and residents, including a 75-foot pool, fitness center and a vaulted, double-height conservatory.

601 Lexington Ave. (Citigroup Center)

Completed in 1977, the Citicorp Center (later renamed
Photo Credit: Google Maps

Completed in 1977, the Citicorp Center (later renamed the Citigroup Center and now known as 601 Lexington Ave.) is 915 feet tall and the 11th tallest building in New York. It was the first skyscraper in the U.S. to be built with a tuned mass damper, which reduces the sway in tall buildings.

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