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Gloria and David Richmond pose for a picture (Credit: Handout )

Gloria and David Richmond pose for a picture on their wedding day, Nov. 27, 1985.

Alzheimer's on Long Island: The Richmonds

Gloria Richmond travels by bus at least four days a week to visit her husband, David, who lives in a Suffolk County nursing facility. Click here to buy a reprint of any photo. To buy a copy of any video, send us an email.

Gloria and David Richmond pose for a picture
(Credit: Handout )

Gloria and David Richmond pose for a picture on their wedding day, Nov. 27, 1985.

Gloria Richmond takes the bus to visit her
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Gloria Richmond takes the bus to visit her husband, David, who has lived at Suffolk County's John J. Foley Skilled Nursing Facility since his decline from Alzheimer's disease made it impossible for Gloria to care for him at home. (Nov. 18, 2007)

Gloria Richmond visits her husband, David, where he
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Gloria Richmond visits her husband, David, where he lives at the John J. Foley Skilled Nursing Facility in Yaphank. Today he also wears a camouflage hat she's brought him that she says reminds her of one of his old favorites. (Dec. 17, 2007)

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Gloria Richmond shares an emotional moment with her
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Gloria Richmond shares an emotional moment with her husband, David. During visits at the nursing facility where he lives, Gloria says, she must walk a fine line between asking for improvements in his care and becoming an annoyance to the staff. (Dec. 17 2007)

David and Gloria Richmond have a visit at
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

David and Gloria Richmond have a visit at the nursing facility where he lives in Yaphank. David wears gloves most of the time so he can't scratch at himself, a compulsion brought on by one of his medications. (Nov. 19, 2007)

Gloria Richmond feeds her husband, David. Pureed foods
(Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Gloria Richmond feeds her husband, David. Pureed foods are best for him at this stage in his Alzheimer's disease. The food trays are color-coded, and blue means David can still feed himself, too. (Dec. 17, 2007)