If you've seen it once, you've seen it a million times.

But that doesn't mean you won't sit through the entirety of "A Christmas Story," "Goodfellas" or "Clueless" every time it's on TV, even if you own it! Check out some of the films Newsday.com staffers just don't tire of.

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"Back to the Future" trilogy: Naturally the 1985 original is the best, but we'll gladly time-travel back to any of the three sci-fi classics for a taste of some serious '80s nostalgia.

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"Brokeback Mountain": Equal parts tender and tragic, this unconventional Hollywood romance put both Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal on the A-list map.

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"Forrest Gump": Tom Hank's heartwarming (not to mention Oscar-winning) performance gives snapshots of life in the '60s, '70s and '80s, and it's just that much better with every viewing.

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"A Christmas Story": Technically we can't stop watching this one on one particular day every year, but watching Jean Shepherd's blue-collar remembrances of Christmas' past -- and Red Rider B.B. Guns -- is as much a Dec. 25 tradition as opening presents. Also: "You'll shoot your eye out!"

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"A Few Good Men": One of Tom Cruise's best, from a time when his career was on the up-and-up. (Demi Moore was pretty good here too.) Also, it boasts one of the most oft-quoted movie lines of all time: "You can't handle the truth!"

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"Anchorman": One of the most quotable movies of all-time: "Milk was a bad choice," "I'm kind of a big deal," and others have worked their way into everyday conversations. Two extreme highlights: (1) The main cast, comprising Will Ferrell, Steve Carrell, Paul Rudd and David Koechner, harmonizing to "Afternoon Delight," and (2) a star-studded fight scene featuring the likes of Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn and Tim Robbins. Nearly a decade after its release, a sequel, "Anchorman: The Legend Continues," is (hallelujah!) coming to theaters Dec. 20, 2013.

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"Bull Durham": This movie may be single-handedly responsible for every person who's ever picked up a baseball bat referring to the major leagues as "the show." Tim Robbins' character sums up baseball near the end of this quote-a-thon of a movie while giving an interview: "Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose and sometimes it rains."

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"Clueless": It's easy to forget the tale of Cher Horowitz is based on Jane Austen's 1815 novel, "Emma" -- and let's not even talk about how this adaptation is so much better than the Gwyneth Paltrow one released in 1996. ("As if!") Starring Alicia Silverstone, this comedy is a loving testament to '90s grunge, girl power and the life-changing effects of a makeover. (It also stars a cherub-faced Paul Rudd. Classic!)

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"Despicable Me": This is one animated movie you won't mind your kids watching over and over. Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) is the ultimate soft-hearted villain, and his trio of adopted girls (Miranda Cosgrove is the eldest) are sugary sweet, but let's get real about the movie's true stars: The Minions! Its 2013 sequel, "Despicable Me 2," is just as good, and super fans, mark your calendars: "Minions" is due for release Dec. 19, 2014.

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"Elf": Of all the Will Ferrell movies in which he plays an overgrown man-child, this holiday flick has got to be the best. Not only is it highly quotable ("I'm sorry for ruining your lives and for cramming 11 cookies into the VCR"), it also captures the true meaning of Christmas -- sure to melt the hearts of Scrooges everywhere.

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"Finding Nemo": One of Disney/Pixar's best (sorry, "Toy Story"). A heartwarming adventure tale that is incessantly quotable ("Aww, you made me ink!"), there's lots to love here for both kids and adults. Get excited for "Finding Dory," the sequel coming around Thanksgiving 2015.

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"Forgetting Sarah Marshall": It's hard to decide whether this comedy about a brokenhearted guy down on his luck is more memorable for Jason Segel's full-frontal or for being Russell Brand's breakout role. Either way, props to both of them.

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"From Dusk ‘till Dawn": What happens when you lock George Clooney, Harvey Keitel and Juliet Lewis in a south-of-the-border bar with a boa-constrictor-wrapped, scantily clad Salma Hayek? Vampire heaven, that’s what. It’s a classic story everyone can relate to.

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"Gladiator": Ridley Scott's epic historical drama starring Russell Crowe is the ultimate "man's man" movie -- not that the ladies don't love it too.

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"Goodfellas": A Martin Scorsese gem. Adding to its draw, for Long Islanders: The vacation scenes were shot on Long Beach.

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"Grease": A favorite of 12-year-old girls for generations (or at least it should be), this is one musical adaptation that is better than the play. How can you not love a high-energy, rock and roll love letter to the Nifty Fifties, starring a super-slick John Travolta?

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"Little Miss Sunshine": Starring Abigail Breslin in her breakout role as an adorable beauty pageant hopeful, this indie about a dysfunctional family who goes on a road trip to find themselves will make you laugh, cry and laugh some more -- only to realize that even if you think your family is dysfunctional, as long as you can love each other you'll be OK.

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"Knocked Up": A true Judd Apatow gem that helped launch the careers of Seth Rogen, Jonah Hill and Jason Segel, who went on to take their brand of comedy into films such as the also addicting "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" and "Superbad" -- and who are basically the most fun band of stoner bros to hit the big screen.

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"Major League": A group of lovable losers playing for the Cleveland Indians bond together to spite their evil owner and reach the playoffs. Charlie Sheen plays Rick "Wild Thing" Vaughn, a talented pitcher with no control ? to put it mildly. One pitch lands about 20 feet outside of the strike zone, prompting the laissez-faire announcer to proclaim "Juuuuuust a bit outside." Slugger Pedro Cerrano, who is having trouble hitting curveballs, uses voodoo, honoring a bobble head-like idol called "Jobu."

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"Mean Girls": One of the most quotable movies of all time, and Merrick native Lindsay Lohan's best film to date, this social satire adapted by Tina Fey from a self-help book about high school cliques is a true American classic.

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"Mrs. Doubtfire": This is one you either love or you hate, but we say: Robin Williams as a woman? Can't beat it!

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"Office Space": This movie never gets old. In fact, it gets funnier every time. Maybe it’s because we can all identify with the main characters’ frustrations (traffic jams, uncooperative office equipment, irritating coworkers, embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars), or maybe we’re just having a case of the Mondays.

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"Pulp Fiction": John Travolta on a toilet. Bruce Willis going postal on a kinky sadist. Bits of brain clinging to Samuel L. Jackson’s ‘fro. What’s not to love? (Warning: They'll definitely make you crave a "Royale wit' Cheese.")

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"Rocky" series: Some of the most well-done and inspirational sports movies ever made.

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"Stand By Me": This 1986 coming-of-age flick (based on Stephen King's novella "The Body") set the bar for later movies with similar story lines, including "The Sandlot" and "Now & Then." And you can't beat this foursome of '80s child actors -- Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and an unrecognizable Jerry O'Connell -- all giving incredible performances just before their careers really took off.

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"The Wizard of Oz": It's simply un-American to not love this one.

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