Do you know which candy was originally named Lik-M-Aid? What about Opal Fruits? Or, which candy became famous from the movie "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" or from television shows such as "Seinfeld" and "Laverne & Shirley"? Find out the answers to these questions and more as we look at classic candy from the 1920s through today. You can purchase the candy at nostalgic candy stores on Long Island or on groovycandies.com, which provided many of the fun facts.

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Gold Mine Gum (S.P. Enterprises)

These candy coated chewing gum gold nuggets come in a cute drawstring sack.

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Bubble Tape (Wrigley Gum)

The pink original bubble gum was introduced in the 1980s and became extremely popular after a successful marketing campaign using the slogan, “It’s six feet of bubble gum for you, not them.”

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Dad's Root Beer Barrels (Washburn Candy)

This individually-wrapped hard candy is root beer flavored and a classic favorite. In 1876, pharmacist Charles Hires introduced a commercial version of root beer at the Phildelphia Centennial Exhibition. By 1893, root beer was sold as a bottled soft drink to the public. It evolved into a non-alcoholic drink during Prohibition, when it was commercially successful. Now it's a beloved hard candy.

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Candy Cigarettes (World Candies)

Each box of this classic treat contains eight white sticks. Candy cigarettes were introduced in the early 20th century and have gained popularity ever since. Many critics believe the candy desensitizes children to the dangers of smoking, and as a result the selling of candy cigarettes has been banned in Finland, Norway, Ireland, Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

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Pop Rocks (Pop Rocks Inc.)

These fruity popping candy come in assorted flavors. Contrary to urban legend, eating a mixture of Pop Rocks and soda won't make your stomach explode.

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Cinnamon Bears (Sweets Candy)

These individually wrapped gummy bears are cinnamon flavored. Interesting fact: The cinnamon bear is a color phase of the American black bear native to Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Wyoming and western Canada.

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Chunky Original (Nestle Inc. / Wonka)

This individually wrapped candy bar is covered with milk chocolate, peanuts and raisins. "Chunky Square," a pavilion at the 1964 New York World's Fair, featured a glass-walled automated factory, where visitors could watch the manufacturing of Chunky candy bars.

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Chuckles (Farley's & Sather)

This sugar-coated jelly candy comes in different flavors: cherry, lemon, lime, orange and licorice. Chuckles brand was first produced in 1921 by Fred W. Amend, who originally made marshmallows. He developed a formula for a new jelly candy, which solved the problem of the outbreak of sweat on the surface of jelly candies.

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Bit-O-Honey (Nestle Inc./Wonka)

This candy is made with a combination of almonds and honey. Bit-O-Honey was first made in 1924 by the Schutter-Johnson Company of Chicago. At the time, Bit-O-Honey was a new kind of candy bar consisting of six pieces of candy wrapped in wax paper and then packaged in wrapper.

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Bosco Chocolate Bar (Praim)

Remember Bosco Syrup's famous turn as one of George Costanza's obsessions on "Seinfeld?" Or Lenny and Squiggy's love of this sweet syrup on "Laverne & Shirley?" Bosco is still America's most beloved chocolate syrup and the classic flavor has been captured in this milk chocolate candy bar.

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Chick O Sticks (Atkinson Candy)

This candy stick is made of crunchy peanut butter and toasted coconut. A fun fact: The company once wrote that it felt the Chick-O-Stick “resembled fried chicken” and that contributed to the name.

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Fizzies Root Beer (Amerilab Technologies)

Drop these tablets in water for a Fizzies dietetic instant sparkling root beer drink. It's sugar free and enriched with vitamin C. Fizzies became a huge cultural icon, when it made an appearance in the 1978 movie, "National Lampoon’s Animal House."

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Charms Sour Balls (Charms Candy)

These cans of sour balls come in assorted flavors: lemon, lime, grape, orange, cherry and pineapple. Walter W. Reid Jr. founded the Charms Candy Company in 1912. During World War II, the U.S. Army began including Charms candies in combat rations as a supplemental energy form.

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Airheads Blue Raspberry (Perfetti Van Melle)

This blue raspberry flavored candy is made on a machine very similar to the toys used to create long strips of PlayDoh.

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Mallo Cups (Boyer Candy)

This candy cup is covered with milk chocolate and has a coconut whipped creme center. Boyer, the company that makes Mallo Cups, still operates from its original plant in Pennsylvania.

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Caramel Creams Bullseyes (Goetze's Candy Co.)

This classic candy is made with a combination of vanilla cream and caramel. In 1917, Goetze’s Candy Company developed a soft, caramel candy, which they called Chu-ees. This product ultimately evolved into Goetze’s signature candy, Caramel Creams, also known as Bull’s Eyes.

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Fruit Stripe Gum (Farley's & Sather)

This striped gum comes in five fruity flavors: cherry, orange, lemon, Peach Smash and Wet-n-Wild Melon. An interesting fact: The famous Fruit Stripe's mascot is a zebra named Yipes.

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Dots (Tootsie Roll Co.)

According to Tootsie Roll Industries, Dots, fruit-flavored chewy gumdrops, are America's No. 1-selling gumdrop, with more than 4 million manufactured every year.

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Candy Necklaces (Albert R.L. & Son)

These individually wrapped treats feature sweet colorful candy beads on a string that you can enjoy while wearing.

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Bubblegum Cigarettes (World Candies)

Blow on the ends of this candy and powdered sugar will come out in the form of white smoke.

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Candy Buttons (NECCO)

This original kids candy comes in lemon, lime and cherry. Engineer and inventor George Theofiel Dib invented the candy button machine, which attaches the buttons to strips of paper.

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Abba-Zaba (Annabelle Candy)

This chewy taffy bar has a peanut butter filled center. The first Abba Zaba bars were manufactured in 1922 by Colby and McDermott.

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Bottle Caps (Nestle Inc./Wonka)

These crunchy candy rolls come in assorted soda pop flavors: cola, cherry, grape, root beer and orange. Before the cherry flavor was introduced, the fifth Bottle Caps flavor was lemon-lime.

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Brach's Royals (Brach's Confections)

This individually wrapped candy is caramel-filled and comes in four flavors: chocolate, maple, raspberry and vanilla.

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Black Taffy (Primrose Candy)

This individually wrapped chewy taffy is red, beige and black colored, and will remind you of Black Jack, a retro candy favorite.

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Big League Chew (Wrigley Gum)

This pink-colored original flavored gum is perfect to chew during a ballgame. Big League Chew entered the game in 1980 thanks to pitchers Rob Nelson and Jim Bouton, who came up with the idea.

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Banana Splits (NECCO)

This individually-wrapped chewy taffy has a similar taste to a banana split and is made by NECCO, which was founded in 1901 and is considered the oldest continuously operating candy company in the United States.

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Atomic Fireballs (Ferrara Candy Company)

This spicy cinnamon candy was invented by candy maker Nello Ferrara in 1954. Atomic Fireballs are known as Atomic FireBlast in the UK.

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Charleston Chew (Tootsie Roll Co.)

This chewy candy is vanilla flavored nougat covered with chocolate. This treat was created in 1922 by the Fox-Cross Candy Company. It was named for the Charleston, a popular dance at that time.

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Andes Mints (Charms Candy)

These creme thin mints are wrapped in a solid green foil wrapper and make the perfect after-dinner treat. In 1921, Andrew Kanelos opened a small candy store in Chicago. He initially called his store Andy's Candies in reference to himself, but after he found that men did not like giving boxes of candy with another man's name to their wives and girlfriends, he changed the spelling of the business to Andes Candies and Andes Mints were born.

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Banana BB Bats (Runk Candy Co.)

An old time favorite is back. These taffy lollipops are just as good as you remember them.

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Mamba Sour Bar (Storck Candy)

This individually wrapped sour candy bar comes in four fruity flavors: sour strawberry, sour lemon, sour orange and sour raspberry.

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Lemonheads (Ferrara Candy Company)

An American classic since 1962, these individually wrapped jawbreakers are sour-lemon flavored. Lemonheads' producer, Ferrara Candy Company, says it can make nearly 2 million large Lemonhead candies a day.

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Laffy Taffy (Nestle Inc. / Wonka)

This classic Wonka candy comes in a variety of fruity flavors with jokes on the wrappers. Laffy Taffy was produced in the 1970s and originally known as Beich's Caramels before changing to Beich's Laffy Taffy.

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Junior Mints (Tootsie Roll Co.)

This candy is made with a mix of creamy mints and pure chocolate. It experienced major pop culture fame when they were prominently featured in an episode of "Seinfeld" titled “The Junior Mint.”

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Jujubes (Farley's & Sather)

This hard/semi-chewy candy comes in five flavors: cherry, lemon, lime, grape and orange. In the 1996 Gummi Reviews, it was written, “Jujubes are a nearly inedible delicacy that have less in common with Gummi bears than prehistoric amber droppings have with old insects.”

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Hot Dog Gum (Farley's & Sather)

This individually-wrapped classic favorite gum is cinnamon flavored.

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Honees Bars (Andre Prost Inc.)

This hard candy bar is filled with honey.

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Haribo Gummi Bears (Haribo of America Inc.)

These original Gummi Bears come in five flavors: cherry, pineapple, lemon, lime and orange. In 1922, company founder Hans Riegel Sr. made the first Gummi Bear.

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Gobstoppers (Nestle Inc. / Wonka)

These small fruit flavored jawbreakers change flavors as they get smaller. Gobstoppers are named after the Everlasting Gobstoppers in Roald Dahl’s children’s book, "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory."

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Freshen Up Bubblegum (Cadbury-Adams)

This individually-wrapped Freshen Up pink bubblegum has a liquid-filled center.

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Dubble Bubble Gum (Concord Confections)

Dubble Bubble, the first flavored pink bubble gum, was invented in 1928 by Walter E. Diemer. Diemer was an accountant at Philadelphia based Fleer Chewing Gum Company.

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Sixlets (Oak Leaf Confections)

These candy-coated milk chocolate balls come in assorted colors. One theory on the origin of its name: The candy was sold as a penny candy with six candy beads to a tube.

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Sen Sen Rolls (F & F Foods)

These crunchy licorice flavored mints are sugar-free, having been sweetened with Nutrasweet. The T.B. Dunn Company invented them in the late 1800s.

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Satellite / Flying Saucer Wafers (Verburg Candy)

These classic flying saucer wafers are filled with small edible candy beads. A 2004 survey named them the most popular candy of all time, and a 2009 survey ranked them as the 12th most popular candy in the country.

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Saf-T-Pops Letters & Numbers (Spangler Candy)

This individually-wrapped letter and number-shaped candy comes in six fruity flavors: orange, lemon, apple, grape, cherry and strawberry. Spangler Candy manufactures 500,000 Saf-T-Pops every day.

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Rocky Road Bar (Annabelle Candy)

This individually-wrapped chocolate bar is coated with marshmallows and contains cashews. Sam Altshuler named the Annabelle Candy Company after his daughter. The Rocky Road bar was its first big success and it is still popular today on the west coast.

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Ring Pops (Topps Gum and Candy)

These individually-wrapped hard candy suckers come in fruit, Space Gems and Twisted flavors. Rumor has it that Topps product engineer Frank Richards came up with the idea after seeing that his daughter was prone to thumb sucking.

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Razzles (Concord Confections)

This fruity flavored bubblegum comes in five flavors: Blaze'n Blueberry, Gushin' Grape, Luscious Lemon, Razzle Raspberry and Tangerine Orange. Razzles were introduced in 1966, with an advertising slogan and jingle of, "First it's a candy, then it's a gum. Little round Razzles are so much fun."

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Indian Brand Pumpkin Seeds (Zenobia)

These seeds are close to the original but the taste has changed. Zenobia has changed the size and the roasting of these seeds. They are now a bit smaller and to quote Zenobia, they are now, “more roasted.”

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Planters Blocks Candy Bars (Nabisco)

The original Planters candy bar is crunchy and filled with peanut butter.

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Pixy Stix (Nestle Inc./Wonka)

These individually-wrapped straw candies are filled with assorted fruit flavored powder: blue raspberry, cherry, grape and orange. Pixy Stix was a drink mix called Frutola, but manufacturer J. Fish Smith found that kids were eating the sweet and sour powder right from the package. Soon it was marketed as a candy.

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Oh Henry Bar (Nestle Inc. / Wonka)

This Nestle chocolate covered bar is made of peanuts, caramel and fudge. The Oh Henry! Bar was first introduced in 1920 by the Williamson Candy Company of Chicago, Illinois. There’s a legend that the bar was originally named after a boy who frequented the company, flirting with the girls who made the candy.

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Skybar (NECCO)

This milk chocolate bar has four flavored sections: caramel, vanilla, peanut and fudge. In 1938, the Sky Bar was first announced to the public by means of a dramatic skywriting advertising campaign.

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Mint Juleps (NECCO)

This individually-wrapped square taffy is chewy and green-mint flavored.

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Mary Janes (NECCO)

This classic chewy individually-wrapped candy is made with a mix of peanut butter and molasses. Charles N. Miller invented this candy in 1914 and named it after his favorite aunt.

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Marshmallow Ice Cream Cone (Marshmallow Cone)

This cone is one of Captain Cone's fun time treats flavored with marshmallow "ice cream." These cones were made in 1936 at Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Zotz Fizz Strings (Andre Prost Inc.)

The sour, fruit-flavored hard candy comes in two flavors: grape and orange, with powder in the middle that fizzes.

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Zero Bar (Hershey Chocolate)

This white fudge candy bar is made with caramel, peanuts and almond nougat. ZERO was first launched by the Hollywood Brands candy company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1920 as the Double Zero Bar was renamed “ZERO” in 1934.

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Whatchamacallit (Hershey's Chocolate)

The peanut-flavored candy is covered with a layer of caramel and Hershey's milk chocolate. It was first introduced in 1978 and got its name from Harrison Limpert while he worked on advertisements for Hershey.

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Wax Liquid Filled Sticks (Concord Confections)

These wax sticks are filled with assorted fruit-flavored liquids. You suck out the liquid and chew the wax, just like gum.

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Valomilk (Sifers Russell Candy)

You'll find creamy marshmallow among two rich milk chocolate cups. These are the original “Flowing Center” candy cups. The name Valomilk represents the three ingredients: vanilla, marshmallow and milk chocolate.

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Tootsie Pops (Tootsie Roll Co.)

These individually-wrapped lollipops have a chewy Tootsie Roll in the center. Tootsie Pops were invented in 1930 by Luke Weisgram, an employee of the Sweets Company of America. Weisgram’s idea came from his daughter, who had shared a lick of her lollipop with him while he had a Tootsie Roll in his mouth.

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Tootsie Frooties (Tootsie Roll Co.)

These chewy, fruit-flavored candies can be a substitute for Tootsie Pops. They were launched in the 1970s and are one of the last American-made penny candies still available.

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Teaberry Gum (Clark Gum)

This classic wintergreen-flavored gum was developed by the D.L. Clark Company around 1900. Its popularity increased in the 1960s when it was used in a series of commercials.

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SweeTarts Rolls (Nestle Inc. / Wonka)

A classic sweet and tart candy that comes in assorted fruity and tangy flavors was first invented as a less messy alternative to Pixy Stix. The Pixy Stix powder was compressed into discs to make the first SweeTarts.

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Super Bubble Gum (Farley's & Sather)

This long-lasting classic fruit-flavored American bubble gum was introduced in 1946. Almost 750 employees worked three shifts to meet demand for the new product.

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Sugar Daddy (Tootsie Roll Co.)

This classic hard candy is made with milk and caramel. Sugar Daddies used to be called Papa Suckers, but the name was changed in 1932.

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Starburst (M & M Mars)

This individually-wrapped chewy fruity-flavored candy is made with real fruit juice and comes in four flavors: cherry, lemon, orange and strawberry. Starbursts were originally called Opal Fruits.

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Squirrel Nut Zippers (NECCO)

A chewy candy made with peanuts and caramel was developed in the mid-1920s.

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Spree Chewy (Nestle Inc./Wonka)

These chewy snack-sized sweet tarts come in five flavors: grape, lemon, lime, cherry and orange.

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Smarties (Ce De Candy)

This colorful candy comes in a 10-piece roll and has been produced since 1949. Smarties in America are different from Smarties in the rest of the world. Nestle makes a chocolate candy called Smarties that is sold in the UK and Canada. American Smarties are called Rockets? in Canada.

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Zagnut (Hershey Chocolate)

This crunchy candy bar is made with peanut butter and toasted coconut. Since Zagnuts doesn't feature chocolate, which melts, it is increasingly popular among US troops in places like Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Wax Lips (Concord Confections)

Wear these chewy, cherry-flavored wax lips and chew them like gum afterward. Invented by the American Candy Company in the early 20th century, they became a popular novelty in the United States, especially for Halloween.

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Snickers (M & M Mars)

This milk chocolate candy bar is covered with peanuts, caramel and nougat. Snickers was named after the Mars family's favorite horse.

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Slo Poke Bars (Warrell Classic Company)

This caramel-filled candy comes in a bar or individually wrapped pieces.

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Red Hots (Ferrara Candy Company)

The cinnamon-flavored hard candy was first trademarked by the Ferrara Pan Candy Company in the 1930s.

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Pez Plush Hello Kitty (Pez Candy)

This cute set comes with 12 Hello Kitty characters, a pack of Pez and a clip. The name Pez was derived from the letters at the start, the middle and the end of the German word for peppermint, Pfefferminz, which was the first Pez flavor.

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Wafer Original Recipe Rolls (NECCO)

These flat disks come in seven flavors and were first produced in 1847. Necco Wafers were carried by Union soldiers during the Civil War and by American soldiers during World War II.

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Mike and Ike (Just Born Inc.)

Chewy assorted fruit flavor candy in five flavors: cherry, lime, lemon, orange and strawberry. A fun fact: Mike and Ike candy was first introduced in 1940 but no one knows exactly where the name came from. Theories about the origin of the name include a company-wide contest, a vaudeville song titled "Mike and Ike" and the "Ike" Eisenhower era.

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Life Savers 5 Flavor Roll (Wrigley Gum)

The classic cherry, orange, pineapple, raspberry and watermelon candies were invented in 1912. Candy manufacturer Clarence Crane of Garrettsville, Ohio, invented Life Savers as a "summer candy" that could withstand heat better than chocolate.

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Mr. Goodbar (Hershey Chocolate)

This chocolate bar with nuts was first introduced in 1925. Milton Hershey initially did not want the Hershey brand name associated with a chocolate bar that contained peanuts, so it was introduced as being produced by the "Chocolate Sales Corporation," a fictitious company.

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Licorice Wheels (Haribo of America Inc.)

You can eat this sweet candy by unrolling the 'wheel' or just by biting right through it. Haribo is a German company founded in 1920, with expanded operations in countries all over the world. Today, it's one of the biggest manufacturers of gummy and jelly sweets in the world.

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Licorice Snaps (American Licorice)

Unwrapped chewy bite size licorice centers with classic pastel color coating.

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Hot Tamales (Just Born Inc.)

Each box is filled with smoking hot, cinnamon flavored candy.

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Fun Dip (Nestle Inc./Wonka)

Dip this sweet candy stick into one of two powders, Razzapple and Cherry-yum.vOriginally called Lik-M-Aid, this candy has been on the market since April 1952. The original powder flavors consisted of lime, cherry and grape, but today there are more of a variety of sour flavors. It comes with the powder Lik-A-Stix, and weren't introduced until the 70s.

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Flipstick Lipsticks (Warrell Classic Company)

This modernized individually-wrapped taffy is cherry flavored and a retro candy treat. You may remember an old penny candy that looks like a candy lipstick. It had a gold wrapper rather than silver and actually make your lips (and face) red. This taffy version won't do that, but it sure does bring back memories of great penny candies.

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Haribo Raspberries (Haribo of America Inc.)

This chewy gummy fruit is raspberry flavored and is covered with candy beads to make it look like it's the real thing.

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Bubblicious Bubblegum (Cadbury-Adams)

Bubblicious holds the Guinness Book of World Record for the most bubble gum bubbles blown at one time.

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El Bubble Gum Cigars (Concord Confections)

These bubblegum cigars come in three flavors: banana, apple and fruit.

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Boston Baked Beans (Ferrara Candy Company)

These beans are small candy coated peanuts and they are also sold in bulk for candy lovers. Ferrara Candy Company can make 38,600 pounds of Boston Baked Beans a day.

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Bonomo Turkish Taffy Bar (Warrell Classic Company)

This classic favorite is a taffy bar that can be broken up into smaller bite-sized pieces. Originally made after World War II in Coney Island, this taffy had been discontinued for decades.

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Black Cow Bars (Warrell Classic Company)

Originally, Black Cow was a Slo Poke caramel candy dipped into chocolate. Now it's a firmer, full-flavored caramel with the chocolate incorporated into the piece itself. An interesting fact: At one point, former manufacturer M.J. Holloway had extended its line to banana, orange, pink and purple cows. Only the Black Cow endured, however, and even managed to survive a 25 year absence.

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Appleheads (Ferrara Candy Company)

This apple flavored hard candy used to be known as Johnny Apple Treats.

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Anise Bears (Farley's & Sather)

These chewy gummy bears are Anise flavored and covered with sugar.

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Charms Squares (Charms Candy)

This individually-wrapped hard candy comes in six fruity flavors: lime, grape, lemon, orange, raspberry and cherry.

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Chiclets Gum Tiny Size (Cadbury-Adams)

These mini-packs of Chiclets come in a variety of colors and is coated with fruity flavors. The product's name is derived from Nahuatl word Itziktli, in English chicle, the substance from which chewing gum was traditionally made.

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Jolly Rancher (Hershey Chocolate)

This pack of individually-wrapped hard candy comes in five fruity flavors: apple, blue raspberry, cherry, watermelon and grape. The product was originally produced by the Jolly Rancher Company, which was founded in 1949.

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Moon Pie Double Decker (Chattanooga Bakery)

The individually-wrapped original marshmallow sandwich is covered with a vanilla coating.

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Bun Bars (Pearson Candy)

This individually-wrapped chocolate bar is covered with chewy maple and roasted peanuts. It also comes in vanilla and caramel.

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