Congressional and state districts across Long Island have changed ahead of the Aug. 23 primaries. Redistricting happens every 10 years, and this year voters in some areas will see new names at the polls. Newsday's Steve Langford reports.  Credit: Kendall Rodriguez; Newsday file footage; Photo credit: Craig Ruttle

If you’re a Northport resident, you’ve been redistricted.

If you live in Elmont, you’ve been redistricted. Or Bellport. Or the western end of Brentwood.

Many Long Island residents will be voting in new congressional or State Senate districts in the Aug. 23 primaries. The once-a-decade redistricting process, coupled with a lawsuit that resulted in a court taking control of the drawing of congressional and Senate maps, has meant some significant changes for some Island communities.

If you're scrambling for information — or weren't even aware you could vote in August — you are not alone. 

"I can't think of another year where voters can legitimately be confused about who they are voting for and where they are voting and perhaps even how they're voting," said Lawrence Levy, dean of Hofstra University's National Center for Suburban Studies.

Steven Romalewski, director of the mapping service at the City University of New York, said the congressional redistricting changes on Long Island fell into three main categories.

“Half of Brookhaven is in a new district. The southern half used to be in District 1, now it’s in 2,” Romalewski said. “All of the town of Huntington and part of Smithtown is now in 1 — it’s used to be in 3. The western border of Hempstead, between Valley Stream and Floral Park, used to be in a Queens district. Now, it’s wholly within a Nassau district, the 4th.”

For instance, Northport. If you’re a resident, you may have been casting a ballot in a strong Democratic, progressive congressional district all your voting life.

Not anymore.

Now, you’re in New York’s 1st Congressional District, which extends to the east end of Long Island and is considered Republican-leaning. Same goes for Huntington Station residents. And parts of Smithtown.

There’s no Democratic primary in the 1st, but there is a three-way Republican fight among Nick LaLota, Michelle Bond and Anthony Figliola.

If you’re in Elmont or Valley Stream, you’ve been a small appendage to a Queens district for the last decade, held by Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-St. Albans).

Now, you’re returning to a southwest Nassau County district, the 4th, where three Democrats are vying Aug. 23 to succeed Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-Garden City): Laura Gillen, Keith Corbett and Carrié Solages.

You’re still in a Democratic-favoring district, though not an overwhelming one. Also, you’ve shifted from the 5th District, where Black residents (40%) were the largest population segment, to the 4th, which is majority white (51%).

The redrawn 3rd Congressional District now features a five-way fight to replace Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Glen Cove): Melanie D’Arrigo, Jon Kaiman, Josh Lafazan, Reema Rasool and Robert Zimmerman.

The district no longer contains parts of Suffolk County, but includes a slightly bigger slice of eastern Queens than it used to. Also, it now contains parts of southeastern Nassau County, through Farmingdale and Massapequa Park — which used to be part of the 2nd District.

In return for giving up those areas, the 2nd District — held by Rep. Andrew Garbarino (R-Bayport) — extends farther east along the South Shore, all the way to Eastport and East Moriches.

In the 2nd, Garbarino faces a Republican primary against Robert Cornicelli and Mike Rakebrant.

In sum: two Democratic primaries in Nassau; two Republican ones in Suffolk.

There also are two State Senate primaries on the Island.

In Suffolk County, Assemb. Phil Ramos (D-Brentwood) is running against former Sen. Monica Martinez in the 4th Senate District, a newly realigned district that has a Hispanic plurality (43% of the district).

The district stretches from the Amityville parking lot of the Long Island Rail Road in the southwest corner to Islandia in the northeast corner.

In Nassau, Sen. Anna Kaplan (D-North Hills) is running in the 7th District against Jeremy Joseph, a co-chair of the Nassau County Democratic Socialists of America.

The district no longer contains Floral Park, the Belmont Park racetrack or parts of Westbury. Now, it’s a more east-west oriented, North Shore-focused district, running from Laurel Hollow to Great Neck.

If you’re a Northport resident, you’ve been redistricted.

If you live in Elmont, you’ve been redistricted. Or Bellport. Or the western end of Brentwood.

Many Long Island residents will be voting in new congressional or State Senate districts in the Aug. 23 primaries. The once-a-decade redistricting process, coupled with a lawsuit that resulted in a court taking control of the drawing of congressional and Senate maps, has meant some significant changes for some Island communities.

If you're scrambling for information — or weren't even aware you could vote in August — you are not alone. 

"I can't think of another year where voters can legitimately be confused about who they are voting for and where they are voting and perhaps even how they're voting," said Lawrence Levy, dean of Hofstra University's National Center for Suburban Studies.

Steven Romalewski, director of the mapping service at the City University of New York, said the congressional redistricting changes on Long Island fell into three main categories.

“Half of Brookhaven is in a new district. The southern half used to be in District 1, now it’s in 2,” Romalewski said. “All of the town of Huntington and part of Smithtown is now in 1 — it’s used to be in 3. The western border of Hempstead, between Valley Stream and Floral Park, used to be in a Queens district. Now, it’s wholly within a Nassau district, the 4th.”

For instance, Northport. If you’re a resident, you may have been casting a ballot in a strong Democratic, progressive congressional district all your voting life.

Click and drag to see the whole map, and zoom to find your neighborhood.

Not anymore.

Now, you’re in New York’s 1st Congressional District, which extends to the east end of Long Island and is considered Republican-leaning. Same goes for Huntington Station residents. And parts of Smithtown.

There’s no Democratic primary in the 1st, but there is a three-way Republican fight among Nick LaLota, Michelle Bond and Anthony Figliola.

If you’re in Elmont or Valley Stream, you’ve been a small appendage to a Queens district for the last decade, held by Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-St. Albans).

Now, you’re returning to a southwest Nassau County district, the 4th, where three Democrats are vying Aug. 23 to succeed Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-Garden City): Laura Gillen, Keith Corbett and Carrié Solages.

You’re still in a Democratic-favoring district, though not an overwhelming one. Also, you’ve shifted from the 5th District, where Black residents (40%) were the largest population segment, to the 4th, which is majority white (51%).

The redrawn 3rd Congressional District now features a five-way fight to replace Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Glen Cove): Melanie D’Arrigo, Jon Kaiman, Josh Lafazan, Reema Rasool and Robert Zimmerman.

The district no longer contains parts of Suffolk County, but includes a slightly bigger slice of eastern Queens than it used to. Also, it now contains parts of southeastern Nassau County, through Farmingdale and Massapequa Park — which used to be part of the 2nd District.

In return for giving up those areas, the 2nd District — held by Rep. Andrew Garbarino (R-Bayport) — extends farther east along the South Shore, all the way to Eastport and East Moriches.

In the 2nd, Garbarino faces a Republican primary against Robert Cornicelli and Mike Rakebrant.

In sum: two Democratic primaries in Nassau; two Republican ones in Suffolk.

There also are two State Senate primaries on the Island.

In Suffolk County, Assemb. Phil Ramos (D-Brentwood) is running against former Sen. Monica Martinez in the 4th Senate District, a newly realigned district that has a Hispanic plurality (43% of the district).

The district stretches from the Amityville parking lot of the Long Island Rail Road in the southwest corner to Islandia in the northeast corner.

In Nassau, Sen. Anna Kaplan (D-North Hills) is running in the 7th District against Jeremy Joseph, a co-chair of the Nassau County Democratic Socialists of America.

The district no longer contains Floral Park, the Belmont Park racetrack or parts of Westbury. Now, it’s a more east-west oriented, North Shore-focused district, running from Laurel Hollow to Great Neck.

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