Former Roosevelt halfway house resident Andre Patton on Wednesday was sentenced in Mineola to 20 years to life in prison for the fatal stabbing of Catholic deacon Patrick Logsdon in 2017. Credit: Kendall Rodriguez; Photo Credit: David L. Pokress

A judge Wednesday sentenced a former Roosevelt halfway house resident to 20 years to life in prison for fatally stabbing the Catholic deacon who managed the residence and was remembered as a "selfless" person who helped homeless ex-convicts.

Andre Patton’s sentencing followed his June guilty plea to murder and weapon charges in connection with the attack at Anthony House on Nov. 3, 2017.

Authorities said Patton, 51, ended the life of Patrick Logsdon by stabbing him more than 20 times with a kitchen knife at about 10 p.m. before fleeing.

Another resident of the East Roosevelt Avenue home, a transitional residence for homeless men, called 911, but a police medic later pronounced Logsdon, 68, dead at the scene.

"Deacon Pat was an amazing member of our community ... His only goal and calling in life was to help men who were homeless, coming out of prison, to get back on the path of independent living and goodness. And for Andre Patton to take his life so callously, and then so cowardly run away, it's a loss for all of us," Nassau District Attorney Anne Donnelly said after the sentencing.

The victim's brother, James Logsdon, 75, of Dallas, said before acting State Supreme Court Justice Robert Schwartz meted out Patton's punishment that his brother had lived a "selfless life" and the Logsdon family would never understand his cruel murder.

Schwartz punished Patton according to the sentence commitment Nassau County Supervising Judge Teresa Corrigan made at the time of his guilty plea.

Corrigan said then that the sentence commitment — which was two years less than prosecutors wanted — was based partly on Patton's psychological background and related reports from doctors for the defense and prosecution.

"I am aware you may have suffered some significant trauma in your life. But none of that justifies your criminal behavior," Schwartz told Patton on Wednesday.

Prosecutor Nicole Aloise said Logsdon had "dedicated his life to giving those who lost their way a second chance" before the defendant brutally murdered him.

Patton’s attorney, Mindy Plotkin, extended condolences to Logsdon's family in Nassau County Court, saying she knew her client prayed for the victim. After the sentencing, the Garden City Park lawyer said her client felt deep remorse.

Patton spoke briefly during the court proceeding, saying in part: "Jesus Christ is my Lord and savior."

The victim's brother said outside the courthouse later that Logsdon "spent his whole life working for others," including in ministries to help gang members in California, undocumented workers by the country's southern border and the homeless in Manhattan.

"People trying to help those coming out of prison, giving them second chances, there's very few of those people in the world. And the fact that we lost one this way is awful for the community. It's devastating for our family," added the victim's nephew, Anthony Logsdon, 50, of Dallas.

Authorities extradited Patton from Memphis, Tennessee, after his arrest on a fugitive warrant about six months after Logsdon’s killing.

Nassau police said Patton, who was getting anger management treatment after an assault conviction, stabbed Logsdon while arguing with him about his program.

After the killing, Patton allegedly stole a Nassau Inter-County Express van he later abandoned in Queens, according to police.

The vehicle had a tracker in it, but days after the stabbing, Patton was able to bail out of the stolen vehicle in Queens and elude police officers who were pursuing him, the NYPD said at the time.

The halfway house had been run by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul Long Island, a charity affiliated with the Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre.

A judge Wednesday sentenced a former Roosevelt halfway house resident to 20 years to life in prison for fatally stabbing the Catholic deacon who managed the residence and was remembered as a "selfless" person who helped homeless ex-convicts.

Andre Patton’s sentencing followed his June guilty plea to murder and weapon charges in connection with the attack at Anthony House on Nov. 3, 2017.

Authorities said Patton, 51, ended the life of Patrick Logsdon by stabbing him more than 20 times with a kitchen knife at about 10 p.m. before fleeing.

The late Catholic deacon Patrick Logsdon.

The late Catholic deacon Patrick Logsdon. Credit: Courtesly Logsdon family

Another resident of the East Roosevelt Avenue home, a transitional residence for homeless men, called 911, but a police medic later pronounced Logsdon, 68, dead at the scene.

"Deacon Pat was an amazing member of our community ... His only goal and calling in life was to help men who were homeless, coming out of prison, to get back on the path of independent living and goodness. And for Andre Patton to take his life so callously, and then so cowardly run away, it's a loss for all of us," Nassau District Attorney Anne Donnelly said after the sentencing.

The victim's brother, James Logsdon, 75, of Dallas, said before acting State Supreme Court Justice Robert Schwartz meted out Patton's punishment that his brother had lived a "selfless life" and the Logsdon family would never understand his cruel murder.

Schwartz punished Patton according to the sentence commitment Nassau County Supervising Judge Teresa Corrigan made at the time of his guilty plea.

Corrigan said then that the sentence commitment — which was two years less than prosecutors wanted — was based partly on Patton's psychological background and related reports from doctors for the defense and prosecution.

"I am aware you may have suffered some significant trauma in your life. But none of that justifies your criminal behavior," Schwartz told Patton on Wednesday.

Prosecutor Nicole Aloise said Logsdon had "dedicated his life to giving those who lost their way a second chance" before the defendant brutally murdered him.

Patton’s attorney, Mindy Plotkin, extended condolences to Logsdon's family in Nassau County Court, saying she knew her client prayed for the victim. After the sentencing, the Garden City Park lawyer said her client felt deep remorse.

Patton spoke briefly during the court proceeding, saying in part: "Jesus Christ is my Lord and savior."

The victim's brother said outside the courthouse later that Logsdon "spent his whole life working for others," including in ministries to help gang members in California, undocumented workers by the country's southern border and the homeless in Manhattan.

James Logsdon, brother of victim Patrick Logsdon, at Nassau County...

James Logsdon, brother of victim Patrick Logsdon, at Nassau County Courty in Mineola on Wednesday. Credit: Kendall Rodriguez

"People trying to help those coming out of prison, giving them second chances, there's very few of those people in the world. And the fact that we lost one this way is awful for the community. It's devastating for our family," added the victim's nephew, Anthony Logsdon, 50, of Dallas.

Authorities extradited Patton from Memphis, Tennessee, after his arrest on a fugitive warrant about six months after Logsdon’s killing.

Nassau police said Patton, who was getting anger management treatment after an assault conviction, stabbed Logsdon while arguing with him about his program.

After the killing, Patton allegedly stole a Nassau Inter-County Express van he later abandoned in Queens, according to police.

The vehicle had a tracker in it, but days after the stabbing, Patton was able to bail out of the stolen vehicle in Queens and elude police officers who were pursuing him, the NYPD said at the time.

The halfway house had been run by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul Long Island, a charity affiliated with the Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre.

Latest videos