George Cousin,a champion stock car race driver from Huntington Station,...

George Cousin,a champion stock car race driver from Huntington Station, died June 17, 2010 of natural causes, surrounded by family and friends at his home. He was 82. Newsday's obituary for George Cousin
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George Cousin, 82, a champion stock car race driver from Huntington Station, died last Thursday of natural causes, surrounded by family and friends at his home.

Known in the racing circuit as Georgie Cousin, he started racing modified and midget race cars in 1949 at tracks in Freeport and Riverhead, his granddaughter, Debi Horton of Amityville, said. He celebrated his first win in 1952 at Dexter Park in Woodhaven, Queens, and returned to the winner's circle many times in his career.

"Newsday once described him as 'the burly George Cousin,' " Horton said, referring to one of several articles that charted Cousin's success. "That feature and that description fits. He was this bigger-than-life, burly guy who could be all business but inside had the biggest heart."

Cousin was born Jan. 24, 1928, in Elmhurst, Queens. After his marriage to Eveyln Cerramon, the couple moved to Jackson Heights in 1945. They had two daughters and in 1956 moved to Huntington Station.

Cousin set many records, according to his granddaughter, including in 1959 achieving the Grand Slam Club of stock car racing, first place in the three major stock car categories: modified, midget and non-Ford sedan.

"He was always passionate about following your dreams," Horton said. "He insisted your dreams matter and he certainly achieved his."

Cousin retired from racing after an accident at the Freeport Stadium in 1967 at the insistence of his wife, Evelyn.

A self-employed mechanic at a shop in Huntington, Cousin earned the respect of his customers with his professionalism, Horton said.

Cousin was a member of the Model "A" Club of Long Island and owned several antique automobiles including a 1929 Model "A" roadster and a 1939 deluxe two-door Ford.

He also enjoyed boating and was a member at Wyncote Yacht Club in Huntington, where he docked his boat, The Bull Ship. He served as an usher at St. Hugh of Lincoln Roman Catholic Church in Huntington Station for several decades.

His wife died in 1975. Survivors, in addition to Horton, include his daughters George-Ann O'Connor of Amityville and Jacqueline Cousin of Huntington Station; two other grandchildren, David Stewart of St. James and Eddie O'Connor of Amityville; two great-grandchildren, and his companion, Camilla Coschignano of Huntington Station.

A funeral was held Saturday at St. Hugh of Lincoln. A cortege of antique autos then drove to St. Patrick's Cemetery in Huntington for the burial.

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