From modest beginnings in Brooklyn, Edward Weinberg built a successful legal career and family in Great Neck.

Weinberg died Friday of complications from a kidney infection, his family said. He was 82.

He grew up in Flatbush, where his father was a newspaper truck driver, said a son, Louis Weinberg, 52, of Port Washington.

Edward Weinberg graduated from Erasmus Hall High School, then attended Brooklyn College and St. John's University School of Law. He was admitted to the bar in 1955.

"He grew up very, very poor in Brooklyn and somehow managed to lift himself up, put himself through school, raise a family," Louis Weinberg said. "He was the typical American success story, and he did it completely on his own."

Edward Weinberg practiced personal injury and construction law -- "not a glamorous kind of law," said his widow, Claire, 76. "But it needed to be done, and he did it well."

He shared his interest in law with Louis Weinberg, who became an attorney specializing in title insurance, as well as his wife, who attended law school while raising three children.

Her husband, she said, was her biggest booster. "He was totally supportive, and a lot of men wouldn't be." After graduating from Hofstra in 1975, Claire Weinberg went on to become a Nassau County judge, presiding over Domestic Violence Court.

Outside law, Edward Weinberg loved playing cards, hosting a Thursday night basement poker game for about 25 years.

"I remember seeing 20 or 30 one-dollar bills, all in the middle of the pot," Louis Weinberg said. "I thought that was all the money in the world."

Edward Weinberg was a history buff, with a passion for World War II. He and his wife visited Omaha Beach, a concentration camp and other European landmarks. Louis Weinberg said his Jewish family has roots in the Ukraine and Poland.

Despite his Brooklyn upbringing, Edward Weinberg was a fan of the New York Giants baseball team, which played at the Polo Grounds until moving to San Francisco in 1958.

"He was always a Giants fan, living in Brooklyn," said Herbert Rothenberg, 82, of Bayside, a longtime friend. "He was unique."

Survivors include two other sons, Mark, of Massapequa, and Elliot, of Dix Hills; a sister, Ruth Salzman, of Boynton Beach, Fla.; and five grandchildren.

The service will be held at Riverside Chapel in Great Neck at 10 a.m. Sunday. Burial will follow at New Montefiore Cemetery in West Babylon.

NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer.  Credit: Randee Daddona; Newsday / A.J. Singh

A taste of summer on Long Island NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer. 

NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer.  Credit: Randee Daddona; Newsday / A.J. Singh

A taste of summer on Long Island NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer. 

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