John Avlon, left, and Nancy Goroff are competing in the June...

John Avlon, left, and Nancy Goroff are competing in the June 25 Democratic primary for the First Congressional District. Credit:

WASHINGTON — The 1st Congressional District Democratic primary will be between two millionaires who have extensive investments in stocks, real estate and savings, according to their financial disclosure statements filed with the U.S. House Clerk.

John Avlon, 51, an author and former television journalist, reported Tuesday that he held assets valued between $975,000 and $2.5 million last year, a figure that does not include the holdings in the name of his wife, Margaret Hoover, 46, the host of PBS’ Firing Line and a CNN commentator.

Avlon, of Sag Harbor, also reported that CNN paid him $584,083 as a regular commentator last year and $240,385 through April 26 of this year.

He did not report his wife’s salaries, but he listed a trust fund set up for his children by his grandmother, Toula Phillips, worth between $352,000 and $1.1 million.

Avlon's filing said he collected $61,000 for making speeches last year, including $25,000 from the Rancho Mirage Writers Festival, which showcases big-name writers and public figures in Rancho Mirage, California.

His speech fees also included $20,000 from the Young Presidents’ Organization, an international executives group; $16,000 from Florida Atlantic University; and $5,000 for a commencement address at Milton Academy, a Massachusetts boarding school he attended.

Avlon’s rival for the Democratic nomination, Nancy Goroff, of Stony Brook, a former Stony Brook University professor making a second run for Congress, last week reported to the House Clerk that she had assets valued at a total of between $11.5 million $53.5 million.

Avlon and Goroff will face off in the June 25 Democratic primary, and the winner will run against first-term Rep. Nick LaLota (R-Amityville), 45, who has the Suffolk County Republican Party’s backing and has no primary opponent.

LaLota won an extension of the deadline for his financial disclosure statement to Aug. 13. As a member of Congress, LaLota makes $174,000 a year.

Last year, LaLota filed a disclosure for 2022 that said he had deferred income of between $30,100 and $102,000 from previous jobs and an IRA worth between $100,000 and $250,000.

Representatives and U.S. senators serving in Congress, and candidates running for those offices, must file annual financial disclosure reports listing income, assets and liabilities. The filings list assets and liabilities in ranges of dollar amounts.

Lawmakers and candidates must file by May 15 each year, but can get a extensions of up to 90 days. Candidates must file by May 15 or 30 days after they file to run for office, whichever is later.

The Ethics in Government Act of 1978 requires the filing of financial disclosure reports to inform the public about their financial interests and to increase confidence in government and deter potential conflicts of interest.

Students could soon have a 'Heat Day' … A 'Heroes Fountain' … 90-year-old volunteer Credit: Newsday

Updated 22 minutes ago Suffolk red light program set to end ... Students could soon have a 'Heat Day' ... A 'Heroes Fountain' ... Wet weather ahead

Students could soon have a 'Heat Day' … A 'Heroes Fountain' … 90-year-old volunteer Credit: Newsday

Updated 22 minutes ago Suffolk red light program set to end ... Students could soon have a 'Heat Day' ... A 'Heroes Fountain' ... Wet weather ahead

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