Democrats and Republicans in the Suffolk Legislature differ on the...

Democrats and Republicans in the Suffolk Legislature differ on the Democrats' new district lines. Credit: Suffolk Legislature

New Suffolk maps level the playing field

While any redistricting is subject to sniping over the process, the proposed legislative map in Suffolk County is by any objective measure fair, compact and provides a level playing field that puts communities first ["Fair maps an elusive dream," Editorial, Dec. 10].

When the Suffolk majority and minority leaders failed to meet the deadline to propose a bipartisan commission, they killed that process and ensured the Legislature would draft a map. While the editorial board wishes we could have convened a commission that "superficially signaled earnestness of purpose," even that low bar would not have been cleared. The Republican appointees who were proposed after deadline included partisan and ineligible choices, including a Republican town vice chairman and an aide to Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley).

Instead of a "superficial" show, the proposed map meets all essential tenets that the editorial board rightfully praises for making "districts contiguous, compact, closer in population, and not designed to protect individual incumbents."

The map makes historic advances in adding voice to minority communities and reflects Suffolk being one-third minorities. It is also a vast improvement on prior maps, which diluted minority communities’ voices.

The best way to ensure public faith in politics is to advance fair policies in the public interest. The Legislature’s map does that.

Robert Calarco, Hauppauge

The writer, a Democrat representing Patchogue, is presiding officer of the Suffolk County Legislature.

Let's get inspired by next space flight

So another famous, wealthy person has been treated to an exhilarating ride to the edge of space "Strahan flies to space on Bezos ship," News, Dec. 12].

What if, for the next trip, an invitation is extended to a science teacher, inspiring hundreds of students to pursue careers in science and medicine?

Tom Kramer, Baiting Hollow