A look at those who first shined on Long Island high school baseball fields before playing under the bright lights in the big leagues. To qualify, they must have appeared in at least one MLB game. (If you see someone missing, email sports@newsday.com.)

Credit: Topps

BUD ANDERSON
High School: Clarke
MLB: Indians (1982-83)
Anderson was drafted by the Mariners out of Rutgers in the third round of the 1977 amateur draft. He made his major league debut in 1982 for the Indians and pitched in 64 games. He retired after the 1983 season with a 4-10 record, 3.68 ERA, 62 walks, and 76 strikeouts in 149 innings.

Credit: Kansas City Royals

MIKE ARMSTRONG
High school: North Shore (1972)
MLB: Padres (1980-81), Royals (1982-83), Yankees (1984-86), Indians (1987)
Armstrong spent eight seasons in the majors, appearing in 197 games, primarily out of the bullpen. He finished his career with a 19-17 record and a 4.10 ERA in 338 innings.

Credit: AP

MIKE BELFIORE
High School: Commack (2006)
MLB: Orioles (2013)
Belfiore appeared in one game for the Orioles in 2013 where he have gave up two home runs and three hits in 1 1/3 innings of work.

Credit: Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club

TOMMY BIANCO
High school: Sewanhaka (1971)
MLB: Brewers (1975)
Bianco was the third overall pick in the 1971 draft by the Brewers. He played in 18 career games (seven at first base, five at third base and one at DH) and had six hits in 24 at-bats.

Credit: Newsday/Ari Mintz

CRAIG BIGGIO
High school: Kings Park (1984)
MLB: Astros (1988-2007)
The seven-time All-Star is one of 28 players to reach the 3,000 hit-mark. He was only the ninth player to reach that milestone while playing for one team. Upon retirement, Biggio had a .281 lifetime average with 3,060 hits, 291 home runs, 1,175 RBIs and 1,944 runs. The Astros retired his No. 7 jersey in 2008. He will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2013.

Credit: Angels Baseball

BRIAN BRADY
High school: St. Agnes (1980)
MLB: Angels (1989)
Brady had a brief two-game career in the outfield with the Angels. His one hit was a pinch-hit RBI double on April 16 against the Mariners. Brady returned to the minors until he retired in 1990.

Credit: Jim McIsaac

DANNY BURAWA
High school: Rocky Point
MLB: Yankees, Braves (2015)
The St. John's product was drafted by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2010 MLB Amateur Draft. He made his debut with the Yanks on Father's Day of 2015, was designated for assignment on Aug. 5 and finished the season with the Atlanta Braves.

Credit: AP

SAL BUTERA
High school: Connetquot
MLB: Twins (1980-82, 1987), Tigers (1983), Expos (1984-85), Reds (1986-87), Blue Jays (1988)
Butera (back, right) spent nine season in the majors primarily as a backup catcher. He batted .227 with eight home runs and 76 RBIs in 359 career games. Butera was a member of the Twins team that defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1987 World Series.

Credit: Major Leage Baseball

CONRAD CARDINAL
High school: Valley Stream Central (1960)
MLB: Colt .45’s (1963)
Cardinal made his major league debut at the age of 21 and pitched in six games with a 0-1 record and a 6.08 ERA.

Credit: Getty Images

FRANK CATALANOTTO
High school: Smithtown (1992)
MLB: Tigers (1997-99), Rangers (2000-02, 2007-08), Blue Jays (2003-06), Brewers (2009), Mets (2010)
Catalanotto played every position during his 14 years in baseball except catcher, shortstop and center field. His best season came in 2001: .330, 11 home runs and 54 RBIs. Catalanotto finished his career with 1,113 hits and a .291 lifetime average in 1,265 games.

Credit: AP

BOB CHIPMAN
High school: Northport (1938)
MLB: Dodgers (1941-44), Cubs (1944-49), Braves (1950-52)
In 12 seasons, Chipman was 51-46 with a 3.72 ERA. He started 87 of the 293 games he appeared in, and also had 14 career saves. In the middle of the 1944 season, Chipman was traded from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Chicago Cubs for Eddie Stanky.

Credit: Kansas City Royals

GARY CHRISTENSON
High school: New Hyde Park (1971)
MLB: Royals (1979-80)
Christenson appeared in six games in 1979 and 30 games in 1980 for the Royals. He compiled a 4.71 ERA in 42 innings.

Credit: Hicksville High School

CHRIS COLETTA
High school: Hicksville (1962)
MLB: Angels (1972)
Coletta, an outfielder, signed with the Red Sox in 1962 but didn't reach the majors until 1972 with the California Angels. He appeared in 14 games and went 9-for-30 (.300) with a home run, a double and seven RBI.

Credit: Cardinals Hall of Fame and Museum

JOHN COSTELLO
High school: Oceanside (1979)
MLB: Cardinals (1988-90), Expos (1990), Padres (1991)
In a four-season career, Costello posted a 11-6 record with a 2.97 ERA and four saves in 119 games as a reliever.

Credit: Boston Red Sox

JOHN CURTIS
High school: Smithtown
MLB: Red Sox (1970-73), Cardinals (1974-76), Giants (1977-79), Padres (1980-82), Angels (1982-84)
Curtis was drafted in the first round of the June secondary draft in 1968. His best season came in 1973 when he posted a 13-13 record in 35 games with a 3.58 ERA. He also had 10 complete games that season, which would be his last with Boston. He retired 11 years later with an 89-97 record with a 3.96 ERA in 438 games.

Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams, Jr.

MATT DALEY
High school: Garden City (2000)
MLB: Rockies (2009-11), Yankees (2013-14)
In three seasons for the Rockies, Daley appeared in 92 games out of the bullpen with a 1-2 record and a 4.71 ERA. He was the winning pitcher for Garden City in the 2000 Class B state championship game. Daley signed a minor-league deal with the Yankees in January 2012, made his debut on Sept. 6, 2013 and went 1-1 with a 3.54 ERA in 20 relief appearances. He retired after the 2014 season and now is a scout with the Yankees.

Credit: Topps

DON DEMOLA
High school: Commack South (1970)
MLB: Expos (1974-75)
Winner of the Yastrzemski Award in 1970, DeMola pitched in 85 games, mainly out of the bullpen, during his two seasons with the Expos. He finished with a 5-7 record and a 3.77 ERA.

Credit: Angels Baseball

TOM DONOHUE
High school: Westbury (1970)
MLB: Angels (1979-80)
Donohue was the ninth overall pick in the 1972 draft and went on to appear in 122 games as a catcher for the Angels with a .200 average, five homers and 28 RBIs.

Credit: Houston Astros

JIM DOUGHERTY
High school: Ross
MLB: Astros (1995-96), A’s (1998), Pirates (1999)
Dougherty was a righty reliever who pitched in 79 games with a 8-8 record with a 5.99 ERA in 94 2/3 innings.

Credit: Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club

STEVE FALTEISEK
High school: Floral Park (1989)
MLB: Expos (1997), Brewers (1999)
Drafted in the 10th round of the 1991 draft, Steve Falteisek pitched out of the bullpen in five games with the Expos and 10 games with the Brewers. He never recorded a win or a loss, but posted a 5.85 ERA in 20 innings pitched.

Credit: AP

JOHN FRASCATORE
High school: Oceanside (1986)
MLB: Cardinals (1994-95, 1997-98), Diamondbacks (1999), Blue Jays (1999-2001)
In 274 games, Frascatore compiled a 20-17 record with 206 strikeouts and a 4.00 ERA in 371 innings.

Credit: Toronto Blue Jays

RAY GIANNELLI
High school: Copiague
MLB: Blue Jays (1991), Cardinals (1995)
Giannelli, an outfielder, third basemen and first basemen, appeared in 18 games and finished with a .143 average with one stolen base.

Credit: Handout

PAUL GIBSON
High school: Center Moriches
MLB: Tigers (1988-91), Mets (1992-93), Yankees (1993-94, 1996)
Paul Gibson pitched primarily out of the bullpen during his eight seasons in baseball. He appeared in four games for the 1996 Yankees, but was released in May and not a part of their championship team. Gibson compiled a 22-24 record with 11 saves and a 4.07 ERA in 319 games.

Credit: AP

ROSS GLOAD
High school: East Hampton (1994)
MLB: Cubs (2000), Rockies (2002), White Sox (2004-06), Royals (2007-08), Marlins (2009), Phillies (2010-11)
After winning the Yastrzemski Award during his senior year at East Hampton, Gload was drafted in the 13th round of the 1997 draft by the Marlins. He finished seventh in the Rookie of the Year voting in 2004 hitting .321 with seven homers and 44 RBIs. He just finished a two-year contract with the Phillies. He primarily plays first base and the outfield.

Credit: The Topps Company

REID GORECKI
High school: Kellenberg (1999)
MLB: Braves (2009)
The outfielder appeared in 31 games (five starts) for Atlanta and hit .200 (5-for-25), with six runs, three RBI and a stolen base. |

Credit: Topps

TOM GORMAN
High school: Valley Stream Central
MLB: Yankees (1952-54), Athletics (1955-59)
Gorman appeared in 289 games, starting 33 in his eight-year career. He finished with a record of 36-36, a 3.77 ERA and 18 saves. Gorman pitched a total of 3.2 innings for the Yankees in the 1952 and 1953 World Series against the Brooklyn Dodgers and gave up one earned run.

Credit: AP

TONY GRAFFANINO
High school: East Islip (1990)
MLB: Braves (1996-98), Devil Rays (1999-2000), White Sox (2000-03), Royals (2004-05, 2006), Boston (2005), Brewers (2006-07), Indians (2009)
After winning the Yastrzemski Award in 1990, Graffanino played 13 seasons in baseball as a steady infield utility player for seven different teams. In 981 games, Graffanino batted .265 with 58 homers and 302 RBIs. Graffanino committed the first error at the new Yankee Stadium on Opening Day in 2009.

Credit: AP

STEVE GRILLI
High school: Calhoun (1967)
MLB: Tigers (1975-77), Blue Jays (1979)
Grilli pitched primarily out of the bullpen during his four-year career, compiling a 4-3 record in 70 games. His son, Jason, has played for six major league teams since 2000 and is currently a member of the Pirates’ bullpen.

Credit: Joseph D. Sullivan

JOHN HABYAN
High school: St. John the Baptist
MLB: Orioles (1985-88), Yankees (1990-93), Royals (1993), Cardinals (1994-95), Angels (1995), Rockies (1996)
Habyan was drafted by the Orioles in the third round of the 1982 draft. The righty mainly pitched out of the bullpen during his 11 years in baseball. Habyan finished with a 26-24 record with a 3.85 ERA in 532 1/3 innings.

Credit: Newsday/Karen Wiles Stabile

CRAIG HANSEN
High school: Glen Cove (2002)
MLB: Red Sox (2005-06, 2008), Pirates (2008-09)
After winning the Diamond Award in 2002, Hansen was drafted by the Red Sox as the 26th pick in the 2005 draft out of St. John’s. Boston sent Hansen to the Pirates in the Jason Bay trade. In 2009, Hansen was diagnosed with Parsonage-Turner syndrome, a condition in which a nerve deteriorates and shuts down muscles in the upper back, shoulder and upper arm.

Credit: AP

PETE HARNISCH
High school: Commack North (1984)
MLB: Orioles (1988-90), Astros (1991-94), Mets (1995-97), Brewers (1997), Reds (1998-2001)
Harnisch was the 27th pick of the 1987 draft by the Orioles out of Fordham. The righty was selected to the All-Star game in 1991 and won 16 games in 1993 and 1996. Harnisch finished his 14-year career with a 111-103 record, 1,368 strikeouts and a 3.93 ERA. He also hit two home runs as a member of the Reds.

Credit: Joseph D. Sullivan

NEAL HEATON
High school: Sachem (1978)
MLB: Indians (1982-86), Twins (1986), Expos (1987-88), Pirates (1989-91), Royals (1992), Brewers (1992), Yankees (1993)
In 1981 he was drafted in the second round by the Indians, Heaton, who won the Yastrzemski Award in 1978, pitched 12 MLB seasons and won 11 or more games four times. He was an All-Star in 1990 as a member of the Pirates. He was 80-96 with 699 strikeouts and a 4.37 ERA in 1,507 innings.

Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara

BERT HEFFERNAN
High school: Newfield
MLB: Mariners (1992)
A catcher drafted out of Clemson by the Milwaukee Brewers in the eighth round in 1988, Heffernan played in eight games for Seattle in 1992 and went 1-for-11 with a double and an RBI. In the five games he caught, Heffernan threw out one of the five baserunners who attempted to steal.

Credit: Seattle Mariners

SKIP JUTZE
High school: Clarke (1964)
MLB: Cardinals (1972), Astros (1973-76), Mariners (1977)
Jutze, a catcher, was drafted by the Cardinals in the 4th round in 1968. He joined the Mariners in their inaugural season and hit the franchise’s first career grand slam on May 17 against the Orioles at the Kingdome. Jutze batted .215 with three homers and 51 RBIs in 254 games.

Credit: AP

BILLY KOCH
High school: West Babylon (1993)
MLB: Blue Jays (1999-2001), A’s (2002), White Sox (2003-04), Marlins (2004)
Koch, who won the Yastrzemski Award in 1993, was the fourth overall pick in the 1996 draft by the Blue Jays. Koch saved 31 games in his first season and finished seventh in the Rookie of the Year voting. He recorded a career-high 44 saves in 2002 for the A’s. The hard-throwing closer converted 163 career saves in 193 chances with a 3.89 ERA.

Credit: AP

RON KLIMKOWSKI
High school: Clarke (1962)
MLB: Yankees (1969-70, 1972), A’s (1971)
Originally signed by the Boston Red Sox in 1964, Klimkowski (center, back) was traded to the Yankees and enjoyed two stints in the Bronx. His first major league start was against the Red Sox and he threw nine shutout innings in a 1-0 loss in 14 innings. Klimkowski retired following the 1972 season with a knee injury. He was 8-12 with a 2.90 ERA in four seasons.

Credit: Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club

PETE KOEGEL
High school: Seaford (1965)
MLB: Brewers (1970-71), Phillies (1971-72)
Koegel was drafted in the fourth round of the 1965 draft by the Kansas City Athletics. He played the outfield, first base and catcher during his three seasons in baseball. He appeared in 62 games and batted .174 with one home run and five RBIs.

Credit: AP

JACK LAMABE
High school: Farmingdale (1954)
MLB: Pirates (1962), Red Sox (1963-65), Astros (1965), White Sox (1966-67), Mets (1967), Cardinals (1967), Cubs (1968)
Lamabe pitched seven seasons, appearing in 285 games for seven teams. Lamabe was a member of the 1967 World Series champion Cardinals. He pitched 2 2/3 innings in the 1967 World Series and gave up two runs in Game 6 against the Red Sox. He was 33-41 with a 4.24 ERA and 434 strikeouts in his career.

Credit: AP

JOHN LANNAN
High school: Chaminade (2002)
MLB: Nationals (2007-2012), Phillies (2013), Mets (2014)
Lannan has spent his first five seasons with the Nationals as a member of their starting rotation. In 153 games, he had a 46-58 record with a 4.18 ERA in 862 innings. Lannan was ejected in his major league debut for hitting Chase Utley and Ryan Howard with pitches. Utley broke his hand and had to be placed on the disabled list.

Credit: AP

GENE LARKIN
High school: Chaminade (1980)
MLB: Twins (1987-93)
Larkin was taken by the Twins in the 1984 Amateur Draft, and by 1988, he was the team’s starting designated hitter. He finished with a career .723 OPS, once led the league in hit by pitches (15 in 1988), and had the game-winning single in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series. His playing time decreased steadily after his sophomore year, and by 1993, he was used only sparingly off the bench.

Credit: AP

DENNIS LEONARD
High school: Oceanside (1966)
MLB: Royals (1974-83, 1985-86)
Leonard was one of the AL’s most domintaing pitchers of the 1970s winning 20 or more games three times. He was a workhorse as well, pitching 200 or more innings in seven straight seasons from 1975-81. Knee injuries cut his promising career short with a lifetime record of 144-106, a 3.70 ERA and two top-10 finishes in the Cy Young voting.

Credit: East Islip High School

JAY LOVIGLIO
High school: East Islip (1974)
MLB: Phillies (1980), White Sox (1981-82), Cubs (1983)
Loviglio registered 10 hits over his four-year career, all of them singles. He was used mainly as a pinch runner, appearing in 46 games and making 56 plate appearances. As a rookie in 1980, he scored more runs (7) than he had at-bats (5).

Credit: Jim McIsaac

STEVEN MATZ
High School: Ward Melville (2009)
MLB: Mets (2015)
Matz the 2009 Yastrzemski Award as Suffolk's top player, was drafted by the Mets in the second round of the 2009 MLB draft. Despite Tommy John surgery on his way through the minor leagues, Matz rose through the Mets' system and made his debut on June 28, 2015, pitching eight innings of five-hit ball and going 3-for-3 with a double and four RBIs in a 7-2 win over the Reds at Citi Field. He made six starts in 2015, going 4-0 with a 2.27 ERA, 34 strikeouts and 10 walks.

Credit: From the University Archives and Records Center, University of Pennsylvania

JERRY MCCARTHY
High school: Freeport (1941)
MLB: St. Louis Browns (1948)
McCarthy, a first baseman, appeared in two games for the St. Louis Browns in the American League. He went 1-for-3. His one hit came in his first careet at-bat, a pinch-hit single against the Yankees' Eddie Lopat.

Credit: Los Angeles Dodgers

TERRY MCDERMOTT
High school: St. Agnes
MLB: Dodgers (1972)
McDermott’s career last 14 days, his final game on Sept. 26, 1972. He appeared in nine games for the Dodgers, picking up three hits in 23 at bats.

Credit: AP

JIM MECIR
High school: Smithtown East (1988)
MLB: Mariners (1995), Yankees (1996-97), Devil Rays (1998-2000), A’s (2000-04), Marlins (2005)
One of the pitchers mentioned in Moneyball, Mecir, who won the Yastrzemski Award in 1988, played for five teams over his 11-year career. He relied heavily on a screwball, and ended his career with 450 strikeouts and a 3.70 ERA. Mecir struggled during his two-year stint with the Yankees, posting ERAs of 5.13 and 5.88.

Credit: Angels Baseball

JOHN MORRIS
High school: Mepham
MLB: Cardinals (1986-90), Phillies (1991), Angels (1992)
Drafted as the 10th overall pick in 1982, Morris spent seven seasons in the majors as an outfielder. In 402 games, he hit .236 with eight home runs and 63 RBIs and was on a Cardinals team that won the 1987 World Series.

Credit: Getty Images / Thearon W. Henderson

SEAN NOLIN
High school: Seaford
MLB: Blue Jays (2013-14), A's (2015)
Nolin made his major-league debut on May 24, 2013, drawing the start against the Baltimore Orioles. He allowed six runs and seven hits in 1 1/3 innings, suffering his first loss at any professional level since Aug. 27, 2011, when he pitched for Class A Lansing. He made one relief appearance in one Blue Jays game in 2014, then was traded to Oakland in the deal that sent Josh Donaldson to Toronto. He went 1-2 with a 5.25 ERA in five starts for the A's in 2015.

Credit: Topps

JIM NORRIS
High school: Seaford
MLB: Indians (1977-79), Rangers (1980)
Norris played in 489 games during his four seasons in baseball, hitting .264 with seven home runs and 110 RBIs. During his career, Norris played 377 games in the outfield and 19 at first base.

Credit: Newsday/David Pokress

KEITH OSIK
High school: Shoreham-Wading River (1987)
MLB: Pirates (1996-2002), Brewers (2003), Orioles (2004), Nationals (2005)
The Yastrzemski Award winner in 1987, Osik spent much of his career with the Pirates as a utility player, predominantly playing catcher. He hit .231 over his career with the Pirates before bouncing around the Majors for his final three seasons. His brother also played baseball, though he never made it out of the minor leagues.

Credit: New York Mets

JOHN PACELLA
High school: Connetquot
MLB: Mets (1977, 1979-80, 1982), Twins (1982), Orioles (1984), Tigers (1986)
Pacella, whose trademark was a quirky delivery, saw his numbers balloon as his career progressed. After posting a 5.14 ERA for the Mets in 1980, he was dealt to the San Diego Padres for Randy Jones. From, there, he’d bounce around, only once finishing a season with an ERA less than 6.75.

Credit: Handout

MIKE PARISI
High school: Sachem North
MLB: Cardinals (2008)
Parisi pitched in 12 games for the Cardinals in 2008, including two starts. He went winless with an ERA of 8.22.

Credit: Seattle Mariners

KEVIN PASLEY
High School: Chaminade
MLB: Dodgers (1974, 1976-77), Mariners (1977-78)
Pasley, a catcher, compiled a .254 batting average with eight runs scored, 31 hits, seven doubles, one home run, and nine RBIs in 55 games.

Credit: Chicago White Sox

MIKE PROLY
High school: Chaminade (1968)
MLB: Cardinals (1976), White Sox (1978-80), Phillies (1981), Cubs (1982-83)
Proly spent seven effective seasons as a reliever in the Majors. He twice posted sub-3.00 ERAs, and finished his career with a 3.23 ERA. Proly wasn’t overpowering as a pitcher, finished with 185 strikeouts in 545 2/3 innings.

Credit: AP

PETE RICHERT
High school: Sewanhaka (1957)
MLB: Dodgers (1962-64, 1972-73), Senators (1965-67), Orioles (1967-71), Cardinals (1974), Phillies (1974)
Richert had a memorable Major League debut, striking out the first six batters he faced, including a four-strikeout inning. He was a spot starter in one of the great Dodgers rotations of all-time, following Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale. His best season as a starter came in 1965 with the Senators when he went 15-12 with a 2.60 ERA. He spent the final seven years of his career as a reliever.

Credit: AP

JOE SAMBITO
High school: Bethpage (1970)
MLB: Astros (1976-84), Mets (1985), Red Sox (1986-87)
Sambito saved 84 games during his 11 seasons, including a career-high 22 in 1979 and was elected to the All-Star game. He finished fifth in the Cy Young voting in 1980 after posting an 8-4 record with a 2.19 ERA and 17 saves. Sambito missed most of the 1982 season and all of 1983 after Tommy John Surgery and retired four seasons later.

Credit: Seattle Mariners

JEFF SCHAEFER
High school: Patchogue-Medford (1978)
MLB: White Sox (1989), Mariners (1990-92), A’s (1994)
Schaefer was a utility infielder over his career, spending most of his time at shortstop and third base. He hit .203 over five seasons with eight steals and a pair of home runs.

Credit: The Topps Company

CHUCK SCHILLING
High school: St. Mary's (1954)
MLB: Red Sox (1961-65)
The second baseman hit .239 in five seasons with Boston, scoring 230 runs and driving in 146 for his career. |

Credit: AP

HERB SCORE
High school: Valley Stream Central
MLB: Indians (1955-59), White Sox (1960-62)
Score attended Valley Stream Central in 1950 before transferring. He won the 1955 Rookie of the Year, going 16-10 with a 2.85 ERA and league-leading 245 strikeouts for the Indians. Score won a career-high 20 games in 1956, was an All-Star and had a league-leading 263 strikeouts. In May 1957, he was struck in the face by a line drive and missed the rest of the season. He never won more than nine games again.

Credit: Stephen Dunn

RAY SEARAGE
High school: Deer Park
MLB: Mets (1981), Brewers (1984-86), White Sox (1986-87), Dodgers (1989-90)
Searage had arguably the most successful career as a Met in team history, albeit in a small sample size. He finished his lone season with a perfect win percentage (1-0) and a perfect batting average (1-for-1). His best two seasons were the final two years of his career, when he posted ERAs of 3.53 and 2.78 out of the bullpen for the Dodgers.

Credit: Baldwin High School

AL SEVERINSEN
High school: Baldwin (1961)
MLB: Orioles (1969), Padres (1971-72)
Severinsen was on four different teams in his career, but never played for two — the Mets and Cubs. He went 3-7 over his three-year career out of the bullpen, posting a 3.08 ERA and 1.360 WHIP.

Credit: Tribune file photo

BOB SHAW
High school: Garden City
MLB: Tigers (1957-58), White Sox (1958-61), A’s (1961), Braves (1962-63), Giants (1964-66), Mets (1966-67), Cubs (1967)
Shaw attended Garden City from 1949-50. He won 18 games for the White Sox and finished third in the Cy Young voting in 1959. The White Sox lost the World Series to the Dodgers, but Shaw defeated Sandy Koufax in Game 5. He finished his career with 108 wins and a 3.52 ERA in 430 games.

Credit: Handout

BILL SOMMERS
High school: Baldwin
MLB: St. Louis Browns (1950)
Sommers played one season in the big leagues and hit .255 with a .370 on-base percentage in 65 games with the Browns.

Credit: AP

MARCUS STROMAN
High school: Patchogue-Medford
MLB: Blue Jays (2014)
Stroman, a first-round selection by Toronto in the 2012 draft, made his debut for the Jays on May 4, 2014, allowing a run in 0.2 innings of relief. After moving into the starting rotation, he finished his rookie season with an 11-6 record, 3.65 ERA, 111 strikeouts and 28 walks in 130 2/3 innings. Stroman tore his ACL in 2015 spring training on a fielding drill, but came back late in the season and went 4-0 with a 1.67 ERA in four starts to help propel the Jays to their first AL East title in 22 years.

Credit: Topps

DON TAUSSIG
High school: Long Beach
MLB: Giants (1958), Cardinals (1961), Colt .45’s (1962)
Originally signed by the Yankees in 1950, Taussig debuted eight years later in the Giants’ outfield and batted .200 in 39 games. He joined the Colt .45’s (now the Astros) in their inaugural season in 1962 and finished his career with a .262 average, four home runs, 30 RBIs in 153 games.

Credit: The Topps Company

RICH THOMPSON
High school: Whitman (1976)
MLB: Indians (1985), Expos (1989-90)
Thompson, a relief pitcher, went 3-8 with a 6.30 ERA for the Indians in his debut season. He appeared in 57 games that season. In 1989, Thompson made it back to the majors with the Expos, where he pitched to a 2.18 ERA in 33 innings over 19 games. Thompson also pitched one scoreless inning for Montreal in 1990.

Credit: AP / Kevin Sullivan

NICK TROPEANO
High School: West Islip
MLB: Astros (2014), Angels (2015)
Tropeano, who also attended Stony Brook University, made his MLB debut on Sept. 10, 2014. He made three more starts for the Astros that season, then was traded to the Angels in a deal that sent Hank Conger to Houston. Tropeano pitched in eight games in 2015. He has a career record of 4-5 with a 4.10 ERA, 51 striekouts and 19 walks in 59 1/3 innings.

Credit: AP

SCOTT ULLGER
High school: Plainview JFK (1972)
MLB: Twins (1983)
Ullger, a first basemen, played in 35 games for the Twins. He hit .190 with five RBIs. After retiring from the game, Ullger has been the Twins first base, third base and hitting coach. He is currently Ron Gardenhire's bench coach.

Credit: Handout

JOE VALENTINE
High school: Deer Park
MLB: Reds (2003-05)
Valentine has showed flashes over his career, but mostly in the minor leagues and the Atlantic League (with the Ducks). He posted ERAs of 18.00, 5.22 and 8.16 in his three MLB seasons, walking 37 batters in 45 2/3 innings.

Credit: AP

TOM VERYZER
High school: Islip
MLB: Tigers (1973-77), Indians (1978-81), Mets (1982), Cubs (1983-84)
Veryzer was the 11th overall pick in the 1971 amatuer draft after winning the Yastrzemski Award. He manned shortstop for the Tigers until the arrival of Alan Trammell, when he was dealt to the Indians. Veryzer hit 14 homers in 3,098 plate appearances, and finished his career with a modest .577 OPS.

Credit: New York Mets

HANK WEBB
High school: Copiague
MLB: Mets (1972-76), Dodgers (1977)
Webb picked up a loss for his first major league decision, the pitcher of record in a 25-inning, 2-1 defeat against the St. Louis Cardinals. The game is the longest in MLB history. He went on to spend much of his six-year career with the Mets. He combined for a 7-9 record and 4.31 ERA with New York and Los Angeles.

Credit: AP

AL WEIS
High school: Farmingdale (1955)
MLB: White Sox (1962-67), Mets (1968-71)
Weis changed his batting style midway through his career, going from a switch hitter to a righthanded hitter after 1968. He was traded with Tommie Agee to the Mets after the 1967 season where he’d spend his final three seasons, winning the World Series in 1969.

Credit: New York Mets

CHARLIE WILLIAMS
High school: Great Neck South
MLB: Mets (1971), Giants (1972-78)
Williams appeared in 268 games, primarily out of the bullpen, after orginally being drafted by the Mets. He finished with a 22-23 record and a 3.97 ERA in 573.1 innings.

Credit: Tom Hauck

DESI WILSON
High school: Glen Cove (1987)
MLB: Giants (1996)
Wilson’s MLB career lasted 41 games. He posted decent numbers, batting .271 with a .677 OPS for the Giants. He caught on with the Hanshin Tigers in 1998, and was back in the minor leagues in 2002.

Credit: AP

BOBBY WINE
High school: Northport (1957)
MLB: Phillies (1960, 1962-68), Expos (1969-72)
Wine was a .215 career hitter with a .964 fielding percentage as a shortstop and third baseman. He led the NL in fielding in 1962 (.979) and 1967 (.980) and won the NL gold glove at shortstop in 1963.

Credit: East Islip High School

RON WITMEYER
High school: East Islip (1985)
MLB: A’s (1991)
After winning back-to-back Yastrzemski Awards in 1984 and ‘85 and three years at Stanford, Witmeyer was taken in the seventh round of the 1988 amateur draft. He made it to the majors in 1991, and was out of baseball after registering one hit in 19 at bats.

Credit: AP

CARL YASTRZEMSKI
High school: Bridgehampton (1957)
MLB: Red Sox (1961-83)
Yaz had a legendary 23-year career with the Red Sox, culminating in an induction into the Hall of Fame in 1989. He is the last MLBer to win the hitting Triple Crown, totaling 44 homers, 121 RBIs and a .326 batting average in 1967. He was named to the All-Star team 18 times, and finished his career with 452 home runs, 1,844 RBIs and a .285 batting average.

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