The big dollars go to top draft picks, usually in the first round, in the NFL, so making the right call is crucial. Here's a look at how the Jets have fared with their top picks since 1986. (Rating based only on their Jet tenure.)

Credit: Newsday/Paul J. Bereswill

1986: MIKE HAIGHT, Tackle, Iowa
Drafted: First round, No. 22 overall
Haight went from tackle to left guard and played six seasons with the Jets. He was a full-time starter in 1989-90.
Impact: Miss

Credit: Newsday/Thomas R. Koeniges

1987: ROGER VICK, Fullback, Texas A&M
Drafted: First round, No. 21 overall
One of the most baffling first-round draft picks for a franchise with a rich history of such, Vick spent three of his four NFL seasons with the Jets. He totaled 11 touchdowns (nine rushing) for the Jets.
Impact: Miss

Credit: Newsday/Paul J. Bereswill

1988: DAVE CADIGAN, Tackle, USC
Drafted: First round, No. 8 overall
Cadigan was a good offensive lineman who played mainly at the guard positions for six years with the Jets before going to the Bengals for one.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Newsday/Jon Naso

1989: JEFF LAGEMAN, Linebacker, Virginia
Drafted: First round, No. 14 overall
This pick caused draft analyst Mel Kiper Jr. to famously say on ESPN, "It's obvious to me right now that the Jets just don't understand what the draft's all about." He was a huge reach at the time, but Lageman actually put up six solid seasons with the Jets. He had 10 sacks in 1991 and 8.5 in 1993. Lageman started 81 of 82 games he played for the Jets before going to Jacksonville.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan

1990: BLAIR THOMAS, Running back, Penn State
Drafted: First round, No. 2 overall
Four seasons, seven touchdowns (five rushing). Yeesh. Thomas' best season came in 1991 when he ran for 728 yards and three TDs.
Impact: Miss

Credit: David L. Pokress

1990: ROB MOORE, Wide receiver, Syracuse
Drafted: First round of supplemental draft, No. 1 overall
A graduate of Hempstead High School, Moore played for the Jets for the first five of his 10 years in the NFL. Moore's best year with the Jets was in 1994: 78 receptions, 1,010 yards, six touchdowns, one Pro Bowl appearance. His average of five years in green: 65 receptions, 851 yards, 4.5 touchdowns.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Newsday/Julia Gaines

1991: BROWNING NAGLE, Quarterback, Louisville
Drafted: Second round, No. 34 overall
Nagle spent five seasons in the NFL, the first three with the Jets. That's about the highlight of his career, unless you count starting 13 games in 1992 and throwing 17 interceptions compared with just seven touchdowns.
Impact: Miss

Credit: AP

1992: JOHNNY MITCHELL, Tight end, Nebraska
Drafted: First round, No. 15 overall
He only lasted four seasons in New York, the last of which was in the Rich Kotite era. He's considered a bust, especially since the Jets drafted over him three years later (Kyle Brady), but his numbers weren't too bad for his position: 158 receptions, 16 touchdowns, 13.2 average yards per catch.
Impact: Miss

Credit: Newsday/Mitsu Yasukawa

1993: MARVIN JONES, Linebacker, Florida State
Drafted: First round, No. 4 overall
Jones spent his entire 11-year career with the Jets, something few draft picks have done. He was the heart and soul of the defense during that time, and in 2001, posted a career-high 135 tackles.
Impact: Hit

Credit: AP

1994: AARON GLENN, Defensive back, Texas A&M
Drafted: First round, No. 12 overall
Glenn was a very solid cornerback for eight years with the Jets. In 1996, he returned two interceptions for touchdowns, a league-best. A two-time Pro Bowler with the Jets, Glenn had 24 interceptions before going to Houston. And yes, he had good coverage on the Dan Marino fake spike play, Marino just threw it to the back side.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Newsday/Jim Cummins

1995: KYLE BRADY, Tight end, Penn State
Drafted: First round, No. 9 overall
Warren Sapp was drafted three spots later, and Jets fans are still mad. Why? Because in his four seasons with the Jets, he never had more than 30 catches in a season. Plus, the Jets had already drafted a tight end three years earlier. Brady played eight seasons with the Jaguars after leaving the Jets, and was rather productive there. Just not with the team that drafted him.
Impact: Miss

Credit: AP

1995: HUGH DOUGLAS, Defensive end, Central State (Ohio)
Drafted: First round, No. 16 overall
The second first-round pick that year, Douglas was good for the Jets and great for the Eagles. In his three seasons in New York, Douglas had 22 sacks. He won defensive rookie of the year in 1995, then Douglas was traded for second- and fifth-round picks in 1998, neither of which became a key player in the Bill Parcells era.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan

1996: KEYSHAWN JOHNSON, Wide receiver, USC
Drafted: First round, No. 1 overall
Only the second overall No. 1 pick the Jets have ever had (Joe Namath in 1965 was the first), Johnson lasted just four seasons in New York. But when Jet quarterbacks threw the flashy receiver the "damn ball," Johnson delivered. He made the Pro Bowl in 1998 and 1999, when he had at least eight touchdowns and 1,100 receiving yards in each of those seasons. He was traded to Tampa Bay for a pair of first-round picks.
Impact: Hit.

Credit: AP

1997: JAMES FARRIOR, Linebacker, Virginia
Drafted: First round, No. 8 overall
Three head coaches in his five seasons in New York may have contributed just a smidge to Farrior's development and starter-backup-starter cycle. In 2001, his best season with the Jets under coach Herm Edwards, Farrior had 142 tackles, seven passes defensed, three forced fumbles and two interceptions. Then what happened? The Jets didn't re-sign him, he goes to Pittsburgh and wins two Super Bowls. As good as Farrior is now, his Jets career was not as inspiring.
Impact: Miss

Credit: Allsport/Ezra Shaw

1998: DORIAN BOOSE, Defensive end, Washington State
Drafted: Second round, No. 56 overall
He was a backup player who appeared in 34 games over three seasons with the Jets. Nothing spectacular, but for a second-round pick - since the Jets didn't have a first-rounder that year - the cost wasn't so bad.
Impact: Miss

1999: RANDY THOMAS, Guard, Mississippi State
Drafted: Second round, No. 57 overall
The Jets' first-round pick this year went to Baltimore from a prior deal. Thomas started every game at right guard before becoming one of the "JetSkins" that left the Jets and went to Washington during a two-year span. But for where he was taken, and what he gave the Jets, it was good value.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Joseph D. Sullivan

2000: SHAUN ELLIS, Defensive end, Tennessee
Drafted: First round, No. 12 overall
The only one of the Jets' four first-round picks in 2000 to spend his entire career with the Jets, Ellis is still going strong. The two-time Pro Bowler has 72.5 career sacks, including 12.5 in 2003 and 11 in 2004.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Joseph D. Sullivan

2000: JOHN ABRAHAM, Defensive end, South Carolina
Drafted: First round, No. 13 overall
Containment may not have been Abraham's strong suit in six seasons with the Jets, but he got paid to sack the quarterback. Which he did. Abraham had 53.5 sacks while with the Jets and made two Pro Bowls before leaving for the Atlanta Falcons.
Impact: Hit

Credit: AP

2000: CHAD PENNINGTON, Quarterback, Marshall
Drafted: First round, No. 18 overall
The third of the Jets' four first-round picks that year, Pennington sat behind Vinny Testaverde for two seasons before becoming a star. In 2002, his first as a starter, Pennington led the NFL with a 104.2 passer rating, the 14th-best in NFL history at that time. He was a leader on and off the field, and led the Jets to three playoff appearances. The only other Jets quarterback to do that was Ken O'Brien. But ultimately, a pair of shoulder surgeries shortened his career with the Jets, who released him after trading for Brett Favre in 2008.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Joseph D. Sullivan

2000: ANTHONY BECHT, Tight end, West Virginia
Drafted: First round, No. 27 overall
Becht was the third tight end drafted by the Jets in a seven-year span. He played five seasons in New York and started every game in the last four. His 133 receptions for 1,164 yards and 17 touchdowns are pretty good, but not first-round good, even if he was the Jets' fourth that year. Among pure tight ends for the Jets, his 17 TDs are second behind Mickey Shuler. (He's fourth if you include those tight ends who also played wide receiver.)
Impact: Miss

Credit: Joe Rogate

2001: SANTANA MOSS, Wide receiver, Miami
Drafted: First round, No. 16 overall
An injury kept Moss to just five games played as a rookie, but he shined in his next three seasons with the Jets. In 2002, his two punt returns for a touchdown were a league best. In 2003, Moss became a full-time No. 1 receiver and caught 74 passes for 1,105 yards and 10 touchdowns. He was traded after the 2004 season to Washington for Laveraneus Coles.
Impact: Hit

Credit: AP

2002: BRYAN THOMAS, Defensive end, UAB
Drafted: First round, No. 22 overall
He wasn't very productive early in his career, but he has lasted nine years with the Jets and shifted between defensive end and outside linebacker. He had six sacks in 2010.
Impact: Hit

Credit: AP

2003: DEWAYNE ROBERTSON, Defensive tackle, Kentucky
Drafted: First round, No. 4 overall
The Jets traded up to get Robertson, then after five inconsistent seasons, shipped him to Denver. He had good games and bad, and amassed 258 tackles and 14.5 sacks in his Jets career. Robertson could not adjust to Eric Mangini's 3-4 defense where he was used as a nose tackle, negating the quickness that the Jets liked when they initially drafted him.
Impact: Miss

Credit: Joe Rogate

2004: JONATHAN VILMA, Linebacker, Miami
Drafted: First round, No. 12 overall
Vilma was a stud linebacker in Herm Edwards' 4-3 defense, including being named the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year and being selected to the Pro Bowl the following season. The team's leader on defense saw his production drop in 2006 in Eric Mangini's 3-4 defense, and a knee injury curtailed his 2007 season. He was traded to New Orleans in the offseason, and helped the Saints win a Super Bowl in the 2009 season.
Impact: Hit

Credit: Getty

2005: MIKE NUGENT, Kicker, Ohio State
Drafted: Second round, No. 47 overall
With no first-round pick because of past trades, the Jets drafted Nugent to replace the departed Doug Brien and his two missed field goals against Pittsburgh in the playoffs. In three-plus seasons, Nugent was 75-for-92 (81.5 percent) on field goals. Nugent was injured in the first game of 2009, replaced by Jay Feely, then released at the end of the season.
Impact: Miss

Credit: AP

2006: D'BRICKASHAW FERGUSON, Left tackle, Virginia
Drafted: First round, No. 4 overall
Newsday's 2001 Thorp Award winner as the best player in Nassau County, Freeport's Ferguson has started every game at left tackle since being drafted five years ago. He's regarded as one of the premier left tackles in the NFL.
Impact: Hit

Credit: David L. Pokress

2006: NICK MANGOLD, Center, Ohio State
Drafted: First round, No. 29 overall
Mangold has started every game since being drafted. The center, a three-time Pro Bowler, is the heart of one of the most productive offensive lines in football.
Impact: Hit

Credit: AP

2007: DARRELLE REVIS, Cornerback, Pittsburgh
Drafted: First round, No. 14 overall
It took just three seasons for Revis to be considered the best cornerback in the NFL. Opposing quarterbacks routinely throw to the other side of "Revis Island." When you can do that, you've made your mark on the game.
Impact: Hit

Credit: AP

2008: VERNON GHOLSTON, Defensive end, Ohio State
Drafted: First round, No. 6 overall
Let's just stick to the numbers here, for now: Three seasons, 45 games, 42 tackles, 0 sacks. Yeesh. The Jets released him after the 2010 season.
Impact: Miss

Credit: AP

2009: MARK SANCHEZ, Quarterback, USC
Drafted: First round, No. 5 overall
Sanchez guided the Jets to the AFC Championship Game in each of his first two seasons, then missed the postseason the next two years (and led the NFL with 51 turnovers in that span) before injuring his shoulder in a preseason game and missing his fifth season. He was released in the offseason and signed with the Eagles.
Impact: Miss

Credit: AP

2010: KYLE WILSON, Cornerback, Boise State
Drafted: First round, No. 29 overall
Wilson had just three interceptions in five seasons with the Jets, who chose not to re-sign him in 2015.
Impact: Miss.

Credit: AP

2011: MUHAMMAD WILKERSON, Defensive tackle, Temple
Drafted: First round, No. 30 overall
Wilkerson is a two-time AP second-team All-Pro and has 41 sacks and 11 forced fumbles since being drafted. He signed a five-year, $86 million extension in July 2016.
Impact: Hit.

Credit: Getty/Al Bello

2012: QUINTON COPLES, Defensive end, North Carolina
Drafted: First round, No. 16 overall
Coples totaled 16 1/2 sacks in his first three seasons, but never emerged as a serious pass-rushing threat and was waived in November 2015.
Impact: Miss.

Credit: Getty

2013: DEE MILLINER, Cornerback, Alabama
Drafted: First round, No. 9 overall
Milliner, billed as the replacement for Darrelle Revis, had an up-and-down first season, showing some flashes of being a solid corner but also being benched numerous times. He battled injuries in 2014 and 2015, limiting him to just eight games in that timespan. He was released in 2016.
Impact: Miss.

Credit: Getty

2013: SHELDON RICHARDSON, Defensive tackle, Missouri
Drafted: First round, No. 13 overall
Richardson had 77 tackles and 3.5 sacks -- and one rushing touchdown -- en route to winning NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year. He had eight more sacks in his Pro Bowl sophomore season, but off-field issues have plagued him since then -- he was suspended four games for a failed marijuana test, then was banned a game under the league's personal-conduct policy for an offseason arrest in 2015.
Impact: Hit.

Credit: Getty Images / Jared Wickerham

2014: CALVIN PRYOR, Safety, Louisville
Drafted: First round, No. 20 overall
Pryor started 11 games and played in all 16, logging 61 total tackles, half a sack and two passes defensed. He had 69 tackles, two interceptions and six passes defensed in 13 games in 2015, then had 60 tackles and six passes defensed in 15 games in 2016.
Impact:: Too early to tell

Credit: Andrew Theodorakis

2015: LEONARD WILLIAMS
Drafted: First round, No. 6 overall
Williams, widely considered the best non-quarterback in the 2015 draft, fell to the Jets and has been a bright young star on a loaded defensive line. He made his first Pro Bowl in 2016 after recording seven sacks in 16 starts.
Impact:: Hit

Credit: Jon Durr / Getty Images

2016: DARRON LEE, Linebacker, Ohio State
Drafted: First round, No. 20 overall
Lee played in 13 games (nine starts) in his rookie season and had 70 tackles, a sack and two passes defensed.
Impact:: Too early to tell

Credit: Getty Images / Elsa

2017: JAMAL ADAMS, Safety, LSU
Drafted: First round, No. 6 overall
Adams ranked No. 3 on Newsday's Big Board heading into the draft.
Impact: Too soon to tell.

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