It is unclear what would happen if a crypto exchange...

It is unclear what would happen if a crypto exchange declared bankruptcy.  Credit: AP/Richard Drew

The cryptocurrency meltdown got even messier after a disquieting disclosure from Coinbase, the biggest U.S. cryptocurrency exchange.

In its quarterly earnings report filed with the SEC, Coinbase said “in the event of a bankruptcy, the crypto assets we hold in custody on behalf of our customers could be subject to bankruptcy proceedings.” Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong tried to quell fears by tweeting, “Your funds are safe at Coinbase. … We have no risk of bankruptcy.”

It is unclear what would happen if a crypto exchange declared bankruptcy. As crypto values plummet, Coinbase has seen a decrease in users trading on its exchange. Its stock has fallen about 70% this year.

Coke’s game plan 

A sweet treat concocted for gamers. 

A sweet treat concocted for gamers.  Credit: Coca-Cola Co.

Coca-Cola has introduced a new beverage aimed at gamers. The soft drink giant says Coca-Cola Zero Sugar Byte “makes for a perfect gaming companion” because it features “the flavor of pixels.” So, what exactly does pixels taste like? Those who have sipped the soda say it’s a sweeter Coke with a fruity cherry or grape aftertaste. Coca-Cola Zero Sugar Byte is available exclusively at Coke’s website.

Hackers keep tabs on Tabby 

Sure, you love him. Just don't use his name as your password.

Sure, you love him. Just don't use his name as your password. Credit: Getty Images/Anadolu Agency

Using your pet’s name as a password is all too common — and dangerous. A Harris survey commissioned by password security firm Aura found that 39% of pet owners use their pet’s name as a password. The problem: 48% of them have also posted their pet’s name on social media, in effect giving cybercriminals a jumpstart into hacking their accounts.

Google invests big in physical offices 

Google will invest $9.5 billion in offices this year.

Google will invest $9.5 billion in offices this year. Credit: TNS/Aric Crabb

Google will invest $9.5 billion in offices over 2022, putting money behind its bid to get workers back in its buildings, including its $2.1 billion campus in Manhattan. The company expects to create 12,000 new jobs as part of the investment. Tech companies have struggled to balance getting workers back to the office without causing unrest among their staff, who are often in high demand.
— Bloomberg 

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