Brian Cohen, right, and son Andrew import flowers from around...

Brian Cohen, right, and son Andrew import flowers from around the world for their business, Flowers by Brian in Mineola. Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.

When flowers were needed for the set of the morning television show “Live with Regis and Kelly”; the wedding of “Girls Cruise” star Tiffany Panhilason; and singer Patti LaBelle’s surprise 80th birthday party, the blooms all came from the same place — Flowers by Brian.

The Mineola company’s creations also have appeared on the pages of such magazines as People, Brides and British Vogue.

Started in 1989, the florals and events brand grew out of a passion for flowers that company president and founder Brian Cohen developed at the age of 14 and passed on to his son, Andrew, now 24.

As a teenager, Brian Cohen did cleaning around a floral warehouse in Woodmere, then worked his way up to event designer there. In 1989 he opened his own retail florist shop in Queens before moving it to Mineola — first to two storefronts on Jericho Turnpike before the business landed at its current Liberty Avenue location about 15 years ago.

“Growing up, Andrew worked weekends and summers around the studio, growing his passion and love for flowers,” Brian Cohen, 58, said. “In college, he explored more of the event industry — specializing in high-end wedding planning. And after realizing his love was with flowers and design, he began his career with me.”

Today the Glen Head father-and-son team operate the business out of a 10,000-square-foot warehouse and showroom space where fresh flowers and event props are housed for everything from intimate and large-scale weddings, coming-of-age events such as Sweet 16 parties and quinceañeras, to showers, corporate gatherings, funerals and more.

Andrew Cohen, one of the company’s special events designers, says that although his father has been firmly planted in the floral and design business for decades, he brings a new perspective to the company that’s particularly helpful when clients are younger.

“I can create out-of-the-box designs,” Andrew Cohen said.

Asked what it is about flowers that seems to keep people coming back for more, Brian Cohen said, “Flowers have the power to transform a space and create a unique ambience.” He added, “For centuries, flowers have made an appearance at weddings — dating back to the Victorian era — and some of this regal style is still reflected in our designs today.”

Even in a tight economy, flowers remain a popular must-have when a celebration or another important occasion is involved, Brian Cohen said.

“We have definitely seen a more cost-conscious consumer recently, but people are still doing flowers for big events,” Andrew Cohen said.

Brian Cohen spoke to Newsday about his business. Answers have been edited for clarity.

In what ways has the flower business changed over the years?

The industry’s evolution to think outside of the box. Designs, combinations and ideas keep getting bigger and crazier. Nowadays, no two weddings are the same.

What were the most popular flowers in the past, and what are they now?

When our company started, most arrangements were made with mums and carnations. Now we work with hundreds of different varieties of flowers, with each wedding having a unique combination. Our flowers are globally grown and sourced, allowing us to accommodate these unique combinations and styles.

Where do your flowers come from?

We import most of our flowers directly from growers around the world. Our blooms come from Colombia, Ecuador, Holland, Taiwan and beyond.

How do you find and keep your employees?

We have about 20 employees that have been with us over 10 years, and our longest-standing employee will be here 22 years this year. Everyone is treated like family, from day one.

What’s your busiest time of year?

From spring to end of fall. People love to get married in beautiful weather.

In what Long Island event venues or restaurants have your flowers been used?

We have been featured in nearly every venue across the tristate area and we are recommended at more than 30 catering halls across New York and New Jersey.

What’s your biggest challenge in business right now and how are you meeting it?

Every week we are seeing new styles, designs and flowers. We are constantly evolving our process and inventory to include as many of these as possible.

What is your advice to someone who’d like to go into your business?

The floral design industry has long, tough hours and involves working weekends and holidays. It is not an industry for the faint of heart. You must be ready and motivated to take whatever life has to throw at you.

What would you like your business to look like in five years?

We’d like to see the business continue on the path it’s on.

When flowers were needed for the set of the morning television show “Live with Regis and Kelly”; the wedding of “Girls Cruise” star Tiffany Panhilason; and singer Patti LaBelle’s surprise 80th birthday party, the blooms all came from the same place — Flowers by Brian.

The Mineola company’s creations also have appeared on the pages of such magazines as People, Brides and British Vogue.

Started in 1989, the florals and events brand grew out of a passion for flowers that company president and founder Brian Cohen developed at the age of 14 and passed on to his son, Andrew, now 24.

As a teenager, Brian Cohen did cleaning around a floral warehouse in Woodmere, then worked his way up to event designer there. In 1989 he opened his own retail florist shop in Queens before moving it to Mineola — first to two storefronts on Jericho Turnpike before the business landed at its current Liberty Avenue location about 15 years ago.

AT A GLANCE

Flowers by Brian, Mineola

Founded: 1989

Leadership: President Brian Cohen

Number of employees: About 45

Facility size: 10,000 square feet

“Growing up, Andrew worked weekends and summers around the studio, growing his passion and love for flowers,” Brian Cohen, 58, said. “In college, he explored more of the event industry — specializing in high-end wedding planning. And after realizing his love was with flowers and design, he began his career with me.”

Today the Glen Head father-and-son team operate the business out of a 10,000-square-foot warehouse and showroom space where fresh flowers and event props are housed for everything from intimate and large-scale weddings, coming-of-age events such as Sweet 16 parties and quinceañeras, to showers, corporate gatherings, funerals and more.

Andrew Cohen, one of the company’s special events designers, says that although his father has been firmly planted in the floral and design business for decades, he brings a new perspective to the company that’s particularly helpful when clients are younger.

“I can create out-of-the-box designs,” Andrew Cohen said.

Asked what it is about flowers that seems to keep people coming back for more, Brian Cohen said, “Flowers have the power to transform a space and create a unique ambience.” He added, “For centuries, flowers have made an appearance at weddings — dating back to the Victorian era — and some of this regal style is still reflected in our designs today.”

Even in a tight economy, flowers remain a popular must-have when a celebration or another important occasion is involved, Brian Cohen said.

“We have definitely seen a more cost-conscious consumer recently, but people are still doing flowers for big events,” Andrew Cohen said.

Brian Cohen spoke to Newsday about his business. Answers have been edited for clarity.

In what ways has the flower business changed over the years?

The industry’s evolution to think outside of the box. Designs, combinations and ideas keep getting bigger and crazier. Nowadays, no two weddings are the same.

What were the most popular flowers in the past, and what are they now?

When our company started, most arrangements were made with mums and carnations. Now we work with hundreds of different varieties of flowers, with each wedding having a unique combination. Our flowers are globally grown and sourced, allowing us to accommodate these unique combinations and styles.

Where do your flowers come from?

We import most of our flowers directly from growers around the world. Our blooms come from Colombia, Ecuador, Holland, Taiwan and beyond.

How do you find and keep your employees?

We have about 20 employees that have been with us over 10 years, and our longest-standing employee will be here 22 years this year. Everyone is treated like family, from day one.

What’s your busiest time of year?

From spring to end of fall. People love to get married in beautiful weather.

In what Long Island event venues or restaurants have your flowers been used?

We have been featured in nearly every venue across the tristate area and we are recommended at more than 30 catering halls across New York and New Jersey.

What’s your biggest challenge in business right now and how are you meeting it?

Every week we are seeing new styles, designs and flowers. We are constantly evolving our process and inventory to include as many of these as possible.

What is your advice to someone who’d like to go into your business?

The floral design industry has long, tough hours and involves working weekends and holidays. It is not an industry for the faint of heart. You must be ready and motivated to take whatever life has to throw at you.

What would you like your business to look like in five years?

We’d like to see the business continue on the path it’s on.

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