A visitor takes a picture with his cellphone of an...

A visitor takes a picture with his cellphone of an image designed with AI by Berlin-based digital creator Julian van Dieken inspired by Johannes Vermeer's painting "Girl with a Pearl Earring" at the Mauritshuis museum in The Hague on March 9. Credit: AFP via Getty Images / Simon Wohlfahrt


That piece of art you generated using an artificial intelligence program? Or that poem you had ChatGPT write for you? You probably can’t copyright them.

In new guidance, the U.S. Copyright Office notes it “has long required that works be the product of human authorship.” The Office says when AI generates written, artistic or musical works solely from text prompts from a human, the resulting works “are determined and executed by the technology — not the human user … and the Office will not register it.”

The Office stressed that technological tools can be used to create copyright-eligible works. For example, an artist using Photoshop to edit images “remains the author of the modified image.”

Apple launches classical music app

Apple will launch a stand-alone classical music app that is...

Apple will launch a stand-alone classical music app that is separate from Apple Music on March 28. Credit: Apple

Apple is releasing a stand-alone app the tech giant says contains “the world’s largest classical music catalog.” Apple Music Classical, which will be separate from its Apple Music app, offers recordings in what the company calls “the highest audio quality” including thousands in immersive Dolby Atmos. The app is scheduled to launch March 28 for iPhones. Apple says an Android version is “coming soon.”

Crypto calm in banking storm


After two years of crazy highs and spectacular crashes, cryptocurrencies have sailed into unfamiliar waters: Some see them as safe harbors in the wake of recent banking-system chaos. App analytics firm Apptopia says downloads for crypto exchanges and wallets soared in the days after Silvergate Capital, Silicon Valley Bank and Signature Bank collapsed. Meanwhile, downloads for apps of traditional bank companies plummeted.

UK bans TikTok on government devices

British authorities have banned Chinese-owned video-sharing app TikTok from government...

British authorities have banned Chinese-owned video-sharing app TikTok from government mobile phones on security grounds. Credit: EPA-EFE / Shutterstock / Andy Rain

British authorities banned Chinese-owned video-sharing app TikTok from government mobile phones on security grounds, following similar moves by the United States and European Union. The moves by the U.K. and other Western governments are prompted by growing concerns that TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, would give user data such as browsing history and location to the Chinese government or push propaganda and misinformation. — AP

A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports. Credit: Newsday Staff

'Why am I giving up my Friday night to listen to this?' A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports.

A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports. Credit: Newsday Staff

'Why am I giving up my Friday night to listen to this?' A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports.

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