Max & Gino’s Clothing Co. employee Sydney Irwin, 19, of...

Max & Gino’s Clothing Co. employee Sydney Irwin, 19, of Melville, center, tries on college logo accessories with her coworkers, July 27, 2022, at the Woodbury store. Credit: Danielle Silverman

Have a child who's headed off to college? It’s time to embrace these transitional weeks of summer in fun and meaningful ways.

On Long Island, college kids can take a “learn how to cook in your dorm” workshop, shop boutiques where college logos can be attached to everything from sweatpants to slippers to teddy bears and fill their shopping carts with cozy furniture and cool décor. They can also put their personal spins on dorm rooms with help from local in-store designers ands families can create a unique goodbye bash in their own backyards.

Here's how to accomplish it all before their college send-off: 

Huntington’s Baking Coach owner/recipe creator Lisa Basini offers hands-on group or private workshops on healthier ways to cook in a college dorm. If teens will have access to a mini fridge and microwave thier common areas, you’re good to go. Basini will demonstrate ways to mix and match basic ingredients (milk, eggs, bread) in a mug, pop them in a microwave, and end up with meals ranging from burrito bowls to French toast, cheesy eggs and mac and cheese.

Basini describes the method behind the mug madness. “Instead of grabbing a bag of chips, maybe college students can make something a little healthier. My goal is to bring back foods that are not processed.” So, if a student is in a dorm cramming for an exam or just can’t deal with trudging to the dining hall in the snow, having a meal in a mug will be more satisfying than a concoction from the vending machine. During Basini’s class, teens will also pick up tips on food safety and kitchen shortcuts. 

This year, Basini has added new “Cookie Dough in a Bag” gift kits that parents and friends can send to anyone who lives on a college campus. It’s a cookie making kit with ingredients that evolve into edible cookie dough. Most ingredients come premeasured in bags. Just add butter, water and combine for cookie dough that’s safe to eat. “It’s a great hug from home in a bag,” Basini says with a smile.

DETAILS: Baking Coach; 320 Broadway Greenlawn, Huntington; 631-543-8608; bakingcoach.com; call to arrange for private or semiprivate two-hour college cooking workshops: $95 per person; Edible Cookie Dough kits: $19.95 each. Cookie dough flavors: chocolate chip, birthday sprinkles, oatmeal raisin, double chocolate, s’mores chocolate chip. All but s’mores can be prepared for vegan or gluten free diets.

On some national store websites, including Pottery Barn Teen, you can chat online with college dorm designers. Assistance is also offered in person at the Huntington store. 

If you’re overwhelmed because you can’t decide which bedspread to buy — not to mention desk lamp, area rug, fluffy chair, pillow, and everything else you’d like to squeeze in your room — an in-store designer may provide some direction.

The designer will discuss room plans, create mood boards and offer receive product recommendations. Popular dorm items include string lights, and “No Nails” headboards, mirrors and shelves. There’s also a Vegan Caramel Channeled Sling chair ($179) that folds up and can be stored under your bed when you need more space. The laundry backpack ($34 and up) is a top seller. 

DETAILS: Pottery Barn Teen; 160 Walt Whitman Rd., Suite 1110, Huntington; 631- 271-1486; pbteen.com.

The shelves at Max and Gino’s in Woodbury are filled with college paraphernalia. Salesperson Elena Andrade, 17, of Syosset, says the products here can’t be found in typical college bookstores. “We have a whole, huge display of college patches, logos and mascots that can be attached to sweatpants, slippers, stuffed animals, pillows, backpacks, anything you can imagine. We encourage customers to come up with their own logo designs, and we guide them along.” For example, one customer wanted to fit the name of her school, Ohio State, across the front of her tank top. All the letters wouldn’t fit, so Elena attached it sideways going down the back. 

Customizing comes in handy for College Bed Decorating parties as well. It’s a popular pre-college surprise party. A group of friends or parents may buy customized clothes and decorations with the name and colors of the college a particular pal will be attending in the fall. 

Fuzzy, customized slippers are a big seller. They come in a wide variety of colors, and college patches are placed on them.

DETAILS: Max & Gino’s Clothing Co.; 7911 Jericho Turnpike, Woodbury; 516-364-1700; maxandginosclothing.com

Party planners aren't only tapped for upscale events. Christina Philbin, owner of Simple Party Designs (631-609-0839; simplepartydesigns.com), says she's been throwing plenty of backyard parties. That includes a going-away-to-college bash, no matter how large or small. Philbin says, “I just tell clients they have to make a budget that they don’t want to go over.”

Goodbye parties can have a lot of heart. Serve food your teen and their friends remember eating together as kids. Hire a DJ or make a playlist of their favorite high school hits through the years. Customize balloons to their new school's colors. And the big ending? Have a cake with an edible photo of everyone together.

Have a child who's headed off to college? It’s time to embrace these transitional weeks of summer in fun and meaningful ways.

On Long Island, college kids can take a “learn how to cook in your dorm” workshop, shop boutiques where college logos can be attached to everything from sweatpants to slippers to teddy bears and fill their shopping carts with cozy furniture and cool décor. They can also put their personal spins on dorm rooms with help from local in-store designers ands families can create a unique goodbye bash in their own backyards.

Here's how to accomplish it all before their college send-off: 

LEARN TO 'COOK,' DORM STYLE

Lisa Basini, of the Baking Coach in Huntington, teaches Christopher...

Lisa Basini, of the Baking Coach in Huntington, teaches Christopher Porzio, 20, of Huntington, several microwave-friendly meals including these veggie nachos, that he can prepare for himself in college. Credit: Danielle Silverman

Huntington’s Baking Coach owner/recipe creator Lisa Basini offers hands-on group or private workshops on healthier ways to cook in a college dorm. If teens will have access to a mini fridge and microwave thier common areas, you’re good to go. Basini will demonstrate ways to mix and match basic ingredients (milk, eggs, bread) in a mug, pop them in a microwave, and end up with meals ranging from burrito bowls to French toast, cheesy eggs and mac and cheese.

Basini describes the method behind the mug madness. “Instead of grabbing a bag of chips, maybe college students can make something a little healthier. My goal is to bring back foods that are not processed.” So, if a student is in a dorm cramming for an exam or just can’t deal with trudging to the dining hall in the snow, having a meal in a mug will be more satisfying than a concoction from the vending machine. During Basini’s class, teens will also pick up tips on food safety and kitchen shortcuts. 

This year, Basini has added new “Cookie Dough in a Bag” gift kits that parents and friends can send to anyone who lives on a college campus. It’s a cookie making kit with ingredients that evolve into edible cookie dough. Most ingredients come premeasured in bags. Just add butter, water and combine for cookie dough that’s safe to eat. “It’s a great hug from home in a bag,” Basini says with a smile.

DETAILS: Baking Coach; 320 Broadway Greenlawn, Huntington; 631-543-8608; bakingcoach.com; call to arrange for private or semiprivate two-hour college cooking workshops: $95 per person; Edible Cookie Dough kits: $19.95 each. Cookie dough flavors: chocolate chip, birthday sprinkles, oatmeal raisin, double chocolate, s’mores chocolate chip. All but s’mores can be prepared for vegan or gluten free diets.

DESIGN THE DORM ROOM TOGETHER

On some national store websites, including Pottery Barn Teen, you can chat online with college dorm designers. Assistance is also offered in person at the Huntington store. 

If you’re overwhelmed because you can’t decide which bedspread to buy — not to mention desk lamp, area rug, fluffy chair, pillow, and everything else you’d like to squeeze in your room — an in-store designer may provide some direction.

The designer will discuss room plans, create mood boards and offer receive product recommendations. Popular dorm items include string lights, and “No Nails” headboards, mirrors and shelves. There’s also a Vegan Caramel Channeled Sling chair ($179) that folds up and can be stored under your bed when you need more space. The laundry backpack ($34 and up) is a top seller. 

DETAILS: Pottery Barn Teen; 160 Walt Whitman Rd., Suite 1110, Huntington; 631- 271-1486; pbteen.com.

CUSTOMIZE COLLEGE CLOTHING

Max & Gino’s Clothing Co. college logo clothing and accessories.

Max & Gino’s Clothing Co. college logo clothing and accessories. Credit: Danielle Silverman

The shelves at Max and Gino’s in Woodbury are filled with college paraphernalia. Salesperson Elena Andrade, 17, of Syosset, says the products here can’t be found in typical college bookstores. “We have a whole, huge display of college patches, logos and mascots that can be attached to sweatpants, slippers, stuffed animals, pillows, backpacks, anything you can imagine. We encourage customers to come up with their own logo designs, and we guide them along.” For example, one customer wanted to fit the name of her school, Ohio State, across the front of her tank top. All the letters wouldn’t fit, so Elena attached it sideways going down the back. 

Customizing comes in handy for College Bed Decorating parties as well. It’s a popular pre-college surprise party. A group of friends or parents may buy customized clothes and decorations with the name and colors of the college a particular pal will be attending in the fall. 

Fuzzy, customized slippers are a big seller. They come in a wide variety of colors, and college patches are placed on them.

DETAILS: Max & Gino’s Clothing Co.; 7911 Jericho Turnpike, Woodbury; 516-364-1700; maxandginosclothing.com

PLAN A GOODBYE-FOR-NOW PARTY

Party planners aren't only tapped for upscale events. Christina Philbin, owner of Simple Party Designs (631-609-0839; simplepartydesigns.com), says she's been throwing plenty of backyard parties. That includes a going-away-to-college bash, no matter how large or small. Philbin says, “I just tell clients they have to make a budget that they don’t want to go over.”

Goodbye parties can have a lot of heart. Serve food your teen and their friends remember eating together as kids. Hire a DJ or make a playlist of their favorite high school hits through the years. Customize balloons to their new school's colors. And the big ending? Have a cake with an edible photo of everyone together.