Jenn Foote uses crystal singing bowls to create meditative sounds at...

Jenn Foote uses crystal singing bowls to create meditative sounds at the It’s Divine Time studio in West Sayville. Credit: Linda Rosier

Ever heard of a sound bath?

Contrary to what you might be thinking, a sound bath does not involve water, a tub or foaming bubbles. Sound baths use the rhythm and tones of instruments such as crystal bowls, tuning forks, chimes and even the human voice to foster relaxation and mental clarity. They are directed by instructors in a studio setting, where small groups are invited to recline and immerse themselves in the experience.

Jenn Foote, an instructor and proprietor of Soulful Footeprints, who facilitates sessions at It’s Divine Time in West Sayville, explained the theory behind how sound baths work: “Sound is used for healing,” said Foote. “Our bodies are made up of vibrations, and the sounds that are played naturally mimic these vibrations. The sound bath is a reset — your body and mind go back to their factory settings, clearing pathways to realign your flow of energy.”

When Joni Isolano, 48, of West Islip, was invited to her first sound bath, she said, “I was extremely skeptical. My friends and co-workers basically took me kicking and screaming. I am very antsy and didn’t think I could lie there for an entire hour.”

But, she said, that hour to herself was transformational. Isolano has five children and a demanding job — “I am very stressed,” she said. The sound bath left her feeling balanced and renewed, more able to deal with the demands of daily life, she said.

Will she be going back for more? “I am 100% going back. It’s a wonderful experience,” she said.

Courtney Ludlam, 28, of Hauppauge, said she has attended two sound baths in recent months, and her experience has evolved in that time.

“The first time I went my thoughts kept interrupting me,” Ludlam said. “By the third time I was able to control my thoughts, and that now translates in other areas of my life.”

She said she highly recommends sound baths to everyone she knows and has even persuaded her mom to try it.

Sound bath sessions are usually 45 minutes to one hour long, and you can find them at wellness centers across the Island. With the chaotic holiday season upon us, it might be just what the doctor ordered.

WHERE TO GO

  • Emerge Integrative Wellness: 623 Broadway, Massapequa; 516-781-1078; emergeyogawellness.com
  • Practice Yoga Oyster Bay: 132 South St., Oyster Bay; 516-922-2800; practiceoysterbay.com
  • Long Island Healing Arts Learning Center: 868 West Jericho Tpke., Huntington; 631-223-2781; www.longislandhealingartslearningcenter.com
  • It’s Divine Time: 93 Main St., Suite 1H, West Sayville; 516-308-6450; itsdivinetime.com
  • Angel Wings and Amethyst Healing House: 252 Moriches-Middle Island Rd., Manorville; 631-664-1002; angelwingsandamethyst.com

COST

A sound bath session can cost as little as $22, up to around $45 for a group workshop. Private sessions run between $50 and $125.

WHAT TO WEAR

Sound bath practitioners advise participants to wear comfortable clothes — stretchy pants and a soft top are ideal. Layers are suggested so you can adjust to your comfort level.

WHAT TO BRING

Although many studios provide amenities to make participants feel comfortable, you are also welcome to bring your own yoga mat, blanket, small pillow or eye mask.

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