In this file photo, fifth grader Courtney Castleberry, 10, reads...

In this file photo, fifth grader Courtney Castleberry, 10, reads to the class with assistance from teacher Steven Ferretti at the Nassau Boces School in Bellmore. August 8, 2011 Credit: Steve Pfost

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said Monday that a deal on limiting public access to teachers' evaluations only to parents appeared unlikely this legislative session.

A deal on the governor's proposal to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana also seemed unlikely. Similarly, prospects for a minimum-wage hike have waned rapidly.

Cuomo, in a radio interview, indicated there was no resolution on the teacher-evaluation issue late Monday, a crucial deadline. "In truth, some of the matters still open, like teacher evaluations, these are not urgent matters . . . and they are complicated," he said on former Gov. David A. Paterson's radio show. "Nothing that we have left, frankly, is that urgent . . . and wouldn't be better [resolved] with more time."

With lawmakers scheduled to adjourn for the year Thursday, Cuomo and legislative leaders would have had to reach a deal Monday to meet the required three-day waiting period between introducing and voting on a bill.

Cuomo could waive that obligation by issuing a "message of necessity." But the governor, who has been criticized in the past for bypassing the requirement, said there was no urgency to resolve teacher evaluations -- because individual results under a new evaluation process, which was revamped earlier this year, wouldn't be available for two years anyway.

Many sources have been saying that the Cuomo administration and unions have been holding productive talks to agree to allow parents -- and parents only -- to view a teacher's evaluation, possibly by appointment at their child's school. There were sticking points about logistical questions, such as would parents have to file a request under the state's Freedom of Information law.

The Cuomo administration sent a draft to lawmakers Saturday, legislators said. But they never received a final version, as of Monday. They said they were still waiting for Cuomo to take the next step.

"There is still no resolution and no bill," said Sen. John Flanagan (R-East Northport), chairman of the Senate Education Committee. "I don't think we've had the type of detailed discussions that will get a compromise yet."

"We are waiting for the governor to send us a bill," said Michael Whyland, spokesman for Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan).

Throughout the spring, Cuomo said the state needed to resolve the issue of access to evaluations before lawmakers adjourned for the summer.

But Monday, he said his priority was a "productive and orderly" final week of the legislative session -- indicating that a "message of necessity" wouldn't serve that goal.

Legislators could return to Albany for a post-Election Day special session, as they did last year.

Assembly Education Chairwoman Cathy Nolan (D-Queens) was reluctant to react to Cuomo's statements about the outlook on teacher evaluations, but she added: "I certainly don't disagree with the governor's statement. . . . The session doesn't end till December."

Among other last-week issues, Cuomo has been pushing legislators to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana -- an idea Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) opposes. Lawmakers also have been discussing a new "mandated reporter" law for school officials who witness abuse, in the wake of the Penn State scandal. But there have been no agreements.

Legislators also continued to work on hundreds of local bills, including one that would allow Nassau University Medical Center to refinance about $300 million in debt, to take advantage of low interest rates. Sen. Kemp Hannon (R-Garden City) and Assemb. Charles Lavine (D-Glen Cove), sponsors of the medical center proposal, acknowledged they weren't sure if both houses would approve it before adjournment.

People on Long Island share their thoughts on President Joe Biden's decision to drop out of the 2024 election and the possibility of Vice President Kamala Harris becoming the Democratic nominee. Credit: Newsday/Kendall Rodriguez; Jeff Bachner; File Footage

'I think it's the best for the country' People on Long Island share their thoughts on President Joe Biden's decision to drop out of the 2024 election and the possibility of Vice President Kamala Harris becoming the Democratic nominee.

People on Long Island share their thoughts on President Joe Biden's decision to drop out of the 2024 election and the possibility of Vice President Kamala Harris becoming the Democratic nominee. Credit: Newsday/Kendall Rodriguez; Jeff Bachner; File Footage

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