Attendees share a moment of prayer Monday night at the H....

Attendees share a moment of prayer Monday night at the H. Lee Dennison Building in Hauppauge during a meeting to discuss security preparations for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Credit: Barry Sloan

Suffolk County police outlined efforts Monday night to boost patrols and enhance security around mosques, as well as Muslim schools and businesses, during the holy month of Ramadan.

Included among those preparations are uniformed and unmarked police providing 24-hour coverage around mosques, said police officials during a presentation at the H. Lee Dennison Building in Hauppauge.

“Events like this are important for us to have a dialogue with you to discuss safety issues and build community partnerships,” acting Police Commissioner Robert Waring told a group that included police, county leaders and members of the Muslim community.

“May this be a time of spiritual unity and compassion for all.”

Along with increased patrols, police will work with mosques to offer active shooter training, said Suffolk police Deputy Inspector Michael Kelly.

Police will also provide security assessments of mosques as well as Muslim schools and businesses, including reviewing visibility, outdoor lighting and security systems, Kelly said.

The Suffolk police hate crimes unit also gave an overview of its work and what qualifies as a hate crime, as opposed to a hate incident, such as one last month in Melville.

Suffolk County Executive Ed Romaine vowed to protect Muslim worshippers.

“This county is here to make sure that you stay safe, that this police department is here to protect your rights to worship as you see fit,” Romaine said. “I wish we could say we lived in a peaceful world and we respect one another. I wish I could say that time has come where we’ll rise above some of the prejudice and discrimination, but we’re not there yet. But I guarantee this county will stand with you so you can practice your faith.”

In a statement, Nassau Police Commissioner Patrick Ryder said the department “is increasing patrols around all houses of worship and its Intelligence Unit continues to monitor all areas of concern.”

Habeeb Ahmed, a board member with the Islamic Center of Long Island in Westbury, said he and other Muslim leaders met last week with Ryder.

“These are very difficult days for the community,” Ahmed said earlier Monday. “We’re taking extra measures with more security and lighting on campus. We have some people watching the doors and parking lot during prayers.”

Security can be difficult for some mosques to manage because everyone prays at the same time, he said, adding that they can’t have someone on the lookout at all times. Prayers can start at 5:30 a.m. and are held five times per day until 10 p.m., Ahmed said.

“We should all watch out for each other, no matter what time of year it is,” he said. “We should work with each other and have an extra set of eyes as good neighbors. We should all have that concern, not just for us, but the whole community on Long Island.”

Baby duck rescue … Huntington film festival … Tulip festival  Credit: Newsday

Trump trial update ... DOT officer workers cleanup parkway ... Liquor store winning ticket ... Mascot ban update

Baby duck rescue … Huntington film festival … Tulip festival  Credit: Newsday

Trump trial update ... DOT officer workers cleanup parkway ... Liquor store winning ticket ... Mascot ban update

Latest videos

Newsday LogoSUBSCRIBEUnlimited Digital AccessOnly 25¢for 5 months
ACT NOWSALE ENDS SOON | CANCEL ANYTIME