Alek Kociski, project manager for Bohler Engineering, speaks on behalf of...

Alek Kociski, project manager for Bohler Engineering, speaks on behalf of Family Residences and Essential Enterprises at the Islip Town Board meeting June 5. The nonprofit requested a zone change to build apartments on Locust Avenue.

  Credit: John Roca

The Islip Town planning board last week reserved decision on whether it would support a zone change request for a proposal to build apartments in Oakdale. 

At the hearing on June 5, some Oakdale residents protested the applicant's plan to build an apartment complex on Locust Avenue, arguing the development would add to an already dangerous traffic problem and cited concerns about overdevelopment in the area. Others, however, said they supported the proposal, noting the applicant's "stellar reputation."

The applicant, nonprofit Family Residences and Essential Enterprises, hopes to build 40 apartments in 11 buildings on the site, with 12 units set aside for people with disabilities. Eight units will be reserved as affordable units. The requested zone change would allow apartments rather than just single-family homes. 

The Bethpage-based nonprofit supports more than 4,000 individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, mental illness or traumatic brain injury through services such as housing, recovery services, transition to work and education, among other things, according to its website. 

The development would build 70 parking spaces, none on Locust Avenue, Eugene De Nicola, the attorney for the nonprofit, said. 

Four residents spoke in favor of the development at the hearing, although one also had concerns.

"I’m a little afraid to say it, but I fully support this development,” said Kathy Patterson, of Oakdale, who lives near the proposal. 

She also expressed concern about traffic in the area, noting there have been crashes near her house.

John Menniti, who lives on Locust Avenue and expressed opposition to the development, said the traffic is so bad that sometimes it is difficult to access his driveway. Three others also spoke against the proposal. 

“We don’t need any more traffic, it’s just horrible,” he said. “I’m just upset that they’re doing this on my block.”

Susan Sorrentino, chief administrative officer at the nonprofit, said after the meeting she understands residents' concerns about traffic and said the group was prepared to address those concerns.

“People are certainly nervous when something new comes, but I anticipate we're going to alleviate all those concerns,” she said.

After the planning board issues a recommendation, which is not binding, the town board must approve a zone change before the application can move forward, according to town spokeswoman Caroline Smith. 

The development also needs a front yard setback variance from the town Zoning Board of Appeals, site plan approval from the town Division of Engineering and building permits from the Division of Building before construction can begin, Smith said.

The Islip Town planning board last week reserved decision on whether it would support a zone change request for a proposal to build apartments in Oakdale. 

At the hearing on June 5, some Oakdale residents protested the applicant's plan to build an apartment complex on Locust Avenue, arguing the development would add to an already dangerous traffic problem and cited concerns about overdevelopment in the area. Others, however, said they supported the proposal, noting the applicant's "stellar reputation."

The applicant, nonprofit Family Residences and Essential Enterprises, hopes to build 40 apartments in 11 buildings on the site, with 12 units set aside for people with disabilities. Eight units will be reserved as affordable units. The requested zone change would allow apartments rather than just single-family homes. 

The Bethpage-based nonprofit supports more than 4,000 individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, mental illness or traumatic brain injury through services such as housing, recovery services, transition to work and education, among other things, according to its website. 

The development would build 70 parking spaces, none on Locust Avenue, Eugene De Nicola, the attorney for the nonprofit, said. 

Four residents spoke in favor of the development at the hearing, although one also had concerns.

"I’m a little afraid to say it, but I fully support this development,” said Kathy Patterson, of Oakdale, who lives near the proposal. 

She also expressed concern about traffic in the area, noting there have been crashes near her house.

John Menniti, who lives on Locust Avenue and expressed opposition to the development, said the traffic is so bad that sometimes it is difficult to access his driveway. Three others also spoke against the proposal. 

“We don’t need any more traffic, it’s just horrible,” he said. “I’m just upset that they’re doing this on my block.”

Susan Sorrentino, chief administrative officer at the nonprofit, said after the meeting she understands residents' concerns about traffic and said the group was prepared to address those concerns.

“People are certainly nervous when something new comes, but I anticipate we're going to alleviate all those concerns,” she said.

After the planning board issues a recommendation, which is not binding, the town board must approve a zone change before the application can move forward, according to town spokeswoman Caroline Smith. 

The development also needs a front yard setback variance from the town Zoning Board of Appeals, site plan approval from the town Division of Engineering and building permits from the Division of Building before construction can begin, Smith said.

A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports. Credit: Newsday Staff

'Why am I giving up my Friday night to listen to this?' A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports.

A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports. Credit: Newsday Staff

'Why am I giving up my Friday night to listen to this?' A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports.

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