Venture capitalist David Calone of Babylon-based Jove Equity Partners brought along his checkbook, just in case there was something in which to invest.

Nancy D. Lieberman of the Uniondale-based law firm Farrell Fritz brought along an open mind.

Calone and Lieberman were among about 30 select Long Islanders invited to Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton Monday for what lab and Long Island Association officials hope will be the start of a new era, one in which investors, companies and entrepreneurs play a major role in bringing to market BNL's research.

The LIA's Accelerate Long Island committee -- a partnership of the region's largest research and educational institutions -- showcased six technologies created at the lab under a new federal program encouraging the private sector to commercialize ideas at the nation's 17 federal laboratories. "Farrell Fritz got involved to see business grow because there's a great brain-drain here," Lieberman said.

Calone said he was interested in one of the technologies, called TeraPaths, which BNL computer scientist Danthong Yu said could help move massive amounts of data along the Internet more quickly. Calone did not immediately write a check, but said he would keep abreast of the technology.

Under new government rules, the cost of buying an option on the technology was reduced this past spring to $1,000, from $50,000, in an effort to speed up commercialization.

"As a national laboratory, we have a mandate to do this," said lab director Sam Aronson.

Venture capitalist Mark Fasciano of Jericho-based Canrock Ventures, said that when he started FatWire Software in the bedroom of his parents' Oyster Bay Cove home more than a decade ago, there were no sessions such as this one. "We need to bring together the researchers and the capital," Fasciano said.

Lab spokeswoman Diane Greenberg said no options were taken immediately but that "we have had some very positive responses, and so we are encouraged."