In this file photo dated Sunday, July 11, 2021, Pope...

In this file photo dated Sunday, July 11, 2021, Pope Francis appears on a balcony of the Agostino Gemelli Polyclinic in Rome. Pope Francis went to the hospital Wednesday to undergo abdominal surgery to treat an intestinal blockage, two years after he had his colon removed 33 centimeters (13 inches) because of inflammation and narrowing of the large intestine. Credit: AP/Alessandra Tarantino

ROME — Pope Francis was “progressively improving” and sitting in an armchair working Friday, following surgery to remove intestinal scar tissue and repair a hernia in his abdominal wall, the Vatican said.

After a restful night, Francis had breakfast and read the newspapers from his armchair, spokesman Matteo Bruni said in a statement. He quoted doctors as saying Francis' condition was “progressively improving and the post-operative course is smooth.”

The pontiff spent the afternoon in prayer and at work, and took Holy Communion in the evening, the Vatican said. His IV has been removed.

"Pope Francis is touched by the numerous messages that he continues to receive in these hours,'' the Vatican said, especially from hospitalized children who have been sending him drawings.

The 86-year-old pope was admitted to the Gemelli hospital on Wednesday for his second major abdominal operation in two years, following a 2021 procedure to remove part of his colon. During the procedure, doctors removed adhesions, or internal scarring, on the intestine that had caused a partial blockage. They also repaired a hernia that had formed over a previous scar, placing a prosthetic mesh in the abdominal wall.

Francis is expected to remain at Gemelli for several days.

A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports. Credit: Newsday/Daddona / Pfost / Villa Loarca

Uncovering the truth about the chemical drums A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports.

A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports. Credit: Newsday/Daddona / Pfost / Villa Loarca

Uncovering the truth about the chemical drums A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports.

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