The Seaford High School Marching Band takes part in the...

The Seaford High School Marching Band takes part in the St. Patrick's Day Parade on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan on Saturday. Credit: Ed Quinn

It’s been years since Plainview-Old Bethpage school administrator Joyce Barry has been able to march in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

Weekdays, when the parade is typically held, she has to be at school.

But this year, Barry was marching up Fifth Avenue clad in an Aran sweater, shamrock scarf and green nail polish, part of the Suffolk County Ancient Order of Hibernians delegation.

“It’s on a Saturday, so I’m able to march today,” she said.

Barry was among thousands marching in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Manhattan, which dates to 1762. This year, it’s being held a day before March 17, because that day falls on a Sunday, so by tradition, the parade is moved in order for the Catholic Sabbath to be kept.

Brian McQuillan, 61, of East Meadow, watched the parade from the sidewalk with his wife, grandson and other family members. McQuillan remembers when he would see his dad, police officer Matty McQuillan, march — sometimes on a snowy March day.

“He used to march, so I follow in his footsteps and come down,” Brian said. Matty died five years ago.

Patty Dario, of Selden, isn’t Irish but “today I am!” she said, polishing off a cup of Guinness she got at a nearby bar. She’s attending her first St. Patrick’s Day Parade at the behest of her half-Irish boyfriend, Eric Dangelo, of Huntington.

“I plan to stay all day till it’s over,” she said.

Catholic Health of Long Island marched behind a banner with over 100 participants, said Ireland native Declan Doyle, 58, president of St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center in Smithtown. The Rockville Centre resident was wearing a green tie and jacket.

“I have to pull out a green tie every year,” he said as the group mustered near Grand Central Terminal.

“This is my first parade — after 37 years,” said Doyle, who moved here in 1987.

At the hospital Friday, the bakery made and distributed shamrock cookies.

Retired Suffolk County police officer Bob Farrell, 56, of East Islip, is a bagpiper who is a veteran of the parade, having marched in it some 30 times. Farrell was marching with the Saffron United Pipe Band.

“It’s our Irish heritage. My grandparents were from Ireland, a lot of people from this band would be the first, second or third generation Irish,” he said.

For St. Patrick’s Day, Abraham Al Kadhi, 4, baked with his mom, Melissa Forstrom, 43, of Pleasantville, in honor of her Irish heritage.

“I made shamrock cookies!” he said.

Abraham was wearing green regalia and peeking his head through a metal barricade on Fifth Avenue. He said he enjoyed “the giant drums” in the parade.

The Seaford High School marching band came with over 120 students — the color guard, marching drums and a winds and brass section.

“We’ve been practicing literally since the school year started,” said Chris Coniglio, the band director.

Lenore Garrett, an optician from East Islip, was with the Suffolk Ancient Order of Hibernians wearing an Aran sweater with a special meaning to her family — it was her dad’s.

Garrett always takes the day off.

“I’ve never gone to school or work on St. Paddy's — always come to the parade,” she said.

It’s been years since Plainview-Old Bethpage school administrator Joyce Barry has been able to march in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

Weekdays, when the parade is typically held, she has to be at school.

But this year, Barry was marching up Fifth Avenue clad in an Aran sweater, shamrock scarf and green nail polish, part of the Suffolk County Ancient Order of Hibernians delegation.

“It’s on a Saturday, so I’m able to march today,” she said.

Barry was among thousands marching in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Manhattan, which dates to 1762. This year, it’s being held a day before March 17, because that day falls on a Sunday, so by tradition, the parade is moved in order for the Catholic Sabbath to be kept.

Kevin Sullivan, left, and Kevin Vaughn, both members of the...

Kevin Sullivan, left, and Kevin Vaughn, both members of the Saffron United Pipe Band from Babylon, get ready to march in the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Manhattan on Saturday. Credit: Ed Quinn

Brian McQuillan, 61, of East Meadow, watched the parade from the sidewalk with his wife, grandson and other family members. McQuillan remembers when he would see his dad, police officer Matty McQuillan, march — sometimes on a snowy March day.

“He used to march, so I follow in his footsteps and come down,” Brian said. Matty died five years ago.

Patty Dario, of Selden, isn’t Irish but “today I am!” she said, polishing off a cup of Guinness she got at a nearby bar. She’s attending her first St. Patrick’s Day Parade at the behest of her half-Irish boyfriend, Eric Dangelo, of Huntington.

“I plan to stay all day till it’s over,” she said.

Catholic Health of Long Island marched behind a banner with over 100 participants, said Ireland native Declan Doyle, 58, president of St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center in Smithtown. The Rockville Centre resident was wearing a green tie and jacket.

Declan Doyle, center left, president of St. Catherine of Siena Medical...

Declan Doyle, center left, president of St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center, marches with Catholic Health of Long Island during the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Manhattan on Saturday. Credit: Ed Quinn

“I have to pull out a green tie every year,” he said as the group mustered near Grand Central Terminal.

“This is my first parade — after 37 years,” said Doyle, who moved here in 1987.

At the hospital Friday, the bakery made and distributed shamrock cookies.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams poses for photos with...

New York City Mayor Eric Adams poses for photos with revelers at the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Manhattan on Saturday. Credit: Ed Quinn

Retired Suffolk County police officer Bob Farrell, 56, of East Islip, is a bagpiper who is a veteran of the parade, having marched in it some 30 times. Farrell was marching with the Saffron United Pipe Band.

“It’s our Irish heritage. My grandparents were from Ireland, a lot of people from this band would be the first, second or third generation Irish,” he said.

For St. Patrick’s Day, Abraham Al Kadhi, 4, baked with his mom, Melissa Forstrom, 43, of Pleasantville, in honor of her Irish heritage.

Pleasantville residents Tameen Al Kadhi and Melissa Forstrom and their son...

Pleasantville residents Tameen Al Kadhi and Melissa Forstrom and their son Abraham enjoy the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Manhattan on Saturday. Credit: Ed Quinn

“I made shamrock cookies!” he said.

Abraham was wearing green regalia and peeking his head through a metal barricade on Fifth Avenue. He said he enjoyed “the giant drums” in the parade.

The Seaford High School marching band came with over 120 students — the color guard, marching drums and a winds and brass section.

“We’ve been practicing literally since the school year started,” said Chris Coniglio, the band director.

Shannon McMorris holds baby Grace as they watch the St....

Shannon McMorris holds baby Grace as they watch the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Manhattan on Saturday. Credit: Ed Quinn

Lenore Garrett, an optician from East Islip, was with the Suffolk Ancient Order of Hibernians wearing an Aran sweater with a special meaning to her family — it was her dad’s.

Garrett always takes the day off.

“I’ve never gone to school or work on St. Paddy's — always come to the parade,” she said.

NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer.  Credit: Randee Daddona; Newsday / A.J. Singh

A taste of summer on Long Island NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer. 

NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer.  Credit: Randee Daddona; Newsday / A.J. Singh

A taste of summer on Long Island NewsdayTV's Elisa DiStefano and Newsday food writer Marie Elena Martinez take a look at the hottest places to dine on Long Island this summer. 

Latest video

YOU'VE BEEN SELECTED

FOR OUR BEST OFFER ONLY 25¢ for 5 months

Unlimited Digital Access.

cancel anytime.