100 baseball games you should have seen, sorted in groups of 10 using these categories: Opening Day, Mets, Yankees, Subway Series, Memorable, Surprises, Historical, Pitching Gems, Playoffs, World Series.

Credit: Getty

THUNDEROUS OVATION FOR BUCKNER
FENWAY PARK, APRIL 8, 2008
World Champion Red Sox invited Bill Buckner, former famous World Series goat, to throw ceremonial first pitch. Long, loud cheering brings him to tears as he walks from Green Monster to mound.

Credit: AP (1912)

PRESIDENTIAL FIRST PITCH
GRIFFITH PARK, WASHINGTON, APRIL 14, 1910
William Howard Taft became the first president to throw ceremonial first pitch, tossing to Senators ace Walter Johnson, who would throw one of his nine Opening Day shutouts. (President Barack Obama marked the 100th anniversary by throwing the first pitch at Nationals 2010 opener).

Credit: AP

THREE HRs FOR KARL (TUFFY) RHODES
WRIGLEY FIELD, APRIL 4, 1994
Having hit only five home runs in 280 major-league at-bats, Rhodes becomes the first ever to homer in his first three at-bats of a season — all off Mets ace Dwight Gooden. One of three to hit three homers on Opening Day, along with George Bell (1988) and Dmitri Young (2005), all on April 4.

Credit: AP

METS BEAT PHILLIES, 1-0, IN 14 INNINGS
SHEA STADIUM. MARCH 31, 1998
Most scoreless innings on Opening Day since 1926 before pinch-hitter Alberto Castillo, lifetime .192 batter, got bases-loaded single off Ricky Bottalico.

Credit: AP

PETE GRAY DEBUTS
SPORTSMANS PARK, ST. LOUIS, APRIL 17, 1945
Gray, natural righthanded thrower, lost right arm in childhood farming accident. Still made it to majors during World War II and got a hit in second at-bat of 7-1 win over Tigers. Was subject of 1986 made-for-TV movie, his OF glove is in Hall of Fame.

Credit: AP

GREEN MONSTER DEBUTS
FENWAY PARK, APRIL 17, 1934
Original 25-foot tall fence had been destroyed in fire on Jan. 5, 37-foot fence (designed by Yankee Stadium architect Osborn Engineering) replaced it. Hand-operated scoreboard added in time for 11-inning 6-5 loss to Senators. In the photo, Stanley Harris (left), manager of the Boston Red Sox, and Joe Cronin, manager of the Washington Senators, look over the improvements.

Credit: MCT

EMILIO BONIFACIO’S INSIDE-THE-PARK HOME RUN
DOLPHINS STADIUM, MIAMI, APRIL 6, 2009
Marlins leadoff batter races around bases after hitting one over head of Nationals CF Lastings Milledge. First Opening Day inside-the-park homer since Carl Yastrzemski in 1968 (Stephen Drew of Diamondbacks had one on Opening Day 2010).

Credit: Getty

FELLER’S NO-HITTER
COMISKEY PARK, CHICAGO, APRIL 16, 1940
Bob Feller, a 21-year-old phenom who had thrown three one-hitters, got the final out on a hot grounder fielded by second baseman Ray Mack on the outfield grass, completing only Opening Day no-hitter in major-league history.

Credit: Getty/Transcendental Graphics

TIGERS’ 10-RUN COMEBACK
BENNETT PARK, DETROIT, APRIL 24, 1901
In their first American League game, the Tigers trailed the Milwaukee Brewers, 13-4, entering the bottom of the ninth inning, but won it 14-13 on Frank (Pop) Dillon’s two-out, two-run double in Bennett Park, shown above at its opening in 1896.

Credit: AP (1932)

YANKEES INTRODUCE UNIFORM NUMBERS
YANKEE STADIUM, APRIL 18, 1929
Although other teams had tried briefly, the Yankees were the first to permanently adopt numbers. They corresponded to places inthe batting order, so Earle Combs was the first hitter, wearing No. 1, Babe Ruth third and Lou Gehrig fourth in a 7-3 win over the Red Sox.

Credit: Newsday / Kathy Kmonicek

SHEA GOODBYE
SHEA STADIUM. SEPT. 28, 2008
The bittersweet experience of being a Mets fan summed up by the final game at Shea Stadium. The Mets lost, 4-2, to the Marlins, completing a second consecutive season collapse. Then a stirring ceremony encompassed 44 years of good memories, featuring the return of Dwight Gooden and symbolic farewell from Tom Seaver and Mike Piazza. Relive that weekend.

Credit: AP

SHEA SHAKES WITH A PENNANT
SHEA STADIUM. OCT. 16, 2000
The noise was so great when Todd Zeile hit a three-run double for a 6-0 lead in Game 5 of National League Championship Series that all stadium decks shook. Mike Hampton’s three-hitter against the Cardinals was the game of his life as the Mets won their fourth pennant.

Credit: AP

METS' FIRST WIN
APRIL 23, 1962
Having lost their first nine games and already 9 1/2 games out of first place, the expansion Mets routed the previously unbeaten Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field, 9-1. Felix Mantilla and Elio Chacon each had three hits, and Jay Hook threw a five-hitter.

Credit: AP

FIREWORKS START AT 4 A.M.
ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY STADIUM. JULY 4-5, 1985
The rain-delayed game could have ended a little before 3:55 a.m., but Braves pitcher Rick Camp (an .060 lifetime hitter at that point) tied it with a homer in 18th. But the Mets scored against him in 19th, and struck him out to end it. Promised holiday fireworks began shortly thereafter.

Credit: AP

METS WIN THE WORLD SERIES
GAME 5, SHEA STADIUM, OCT. 16, 1969
Ron Swoboda, known for his catch in the previous game, actually had the winning hit in the eighth inning as the Mets recovered from a 3-0 deficit to beat Orioles, 5-3. Cleon Jones made the definitive catch, on Davey Johnson’s fly in the ninth, to clinch what’s considered the most improbable triumph in Series history.

Credit: AP

BUD HARRELSON FIGHTS PETE ROSE IN GAME 3
SHEA STADIUM. OCT. 8, 1973
Harrelson didn’t like the way Rose slid into second on Joe Morgan’s grounder and took on the much heavier superstar. The Mets turned the double play, won the game, 9-2, and the NL Championship Series, 3-2. Years later, Harrelson, part-owner of L.I. Ducks, welcomed Pete Rose Jr. to play for team.

Credit: Newsday file

"METS WIN THE DAMN THING"
VETERANS STADIUM, PHILADELPHIA. JULY 25, 1990
The Mets had led, 9-0, and started the ninth with a 10-3 lead, but the Phillies scored six times without a hard-hit ball and had the tying run on third. The game was immortalized by Bob Murphy’s call: “A line drive to Mario Diaz, and the Mets win the ballgame! They win the damn thing by a score of 10 to 9!"

Credit: AP

ROBIN VENTURA’S GRAND SINGLE
SHEA STADIUM. OCT. 17, 1999
The Mets were on the verge of elimination by the rival Braves in NLCS Game 5, then tied it with Todd Pratt’s bases-loaded walk. Ventura won it with a home run, but is credited with only a single because Pratt (whose walk-off homer had knocked out Diamondbacks in the first round), tackled him on bases in celebration.

Credit: AP

TOM SEAVER’S IMPERFECT GAME
SHEA STADIUM. JULY 9, 1969
Ace of the surging Mets (seven straight wins) retired the first 25 Cubs. But with one out in the ninth, rookie Jim Qualls, the No. 8 batter, hits a single to left-center. Forty-two years later, no Met still has thrown a perfect game or no-hitter.

Credit: AP

MIKE PIAZZA’S HOME RUN BEATS BRAVES
SHEA STADIUM. SEPT. 21, 2001
Piazza was among those moved to tears by the emotions of the first game in New York after 9/11. The crowd erupted with the city’s largest burst of joy of the month when he hit Steve Karsay’s eighth-inning pitch over the left-centerfield wall for 3-2 win that even Braves manager Bobby Cox thought was fitting.

Credit: AP

JOE DIMAGGIO HITS IN 44TH STRAIGHT GAME, TYING 44-YEAR-OLD RECORD
YANKEE STADIUM. JULY 1, 1941
An oppressively hot and humid day didn’t prevent 52,832 from attending a Tuesday afternoon doubleheader as DiMaggio chased Wee Willie Keeler’s consecutive games hitting record. He hits in both games against Red Sox -- on the day Channels 2 and 4 in New York began broadcasting.

Credit: AP

YANKEES WIN FIRST CHAMPIONSHIP
POLO GROUNDS, OCT. 15, 1923
At the finish of their first year in Yankee Stadium, the Yankees score five in the eighth inning of Game 6 and beat the Giants, their former landlords, 6-4. Sad Sam Jones pitched two scoreless innings for the save as the Yankees won the World Series for first time.

Credit: AP

RON GUIDRY’S 18 STRIKEOUTS
YANKEE STADIUM. JUNE 17, 1978
Guidry improved his record to 11-0, on his way to 25-3, and set the franchise record by striking out 18 Angels during a four-hit shutout. The crowd of 33,162 cheered loudly each time Guidry got two strikes on a batter.

Credit: Newsday / Paul J. Bereswill

DAVID WELLS’ PERFECT GAME
YANKEE STADIUM. MAY 17, 1998
The first Yankee perfect game since Don Larsen in 1956 was thrown by a pitcher who attended the same San Diego high school as Larsen. The key defensive play against the Twins was a strong throw in the eighth inning by second baseman Chuck Knoblauch, who was known for his throwing problems.

Credit: AP

DAVE RIGHETTI’S NO-HITTER
YANKEE STADIUM, JULY 4, 1983
On the 44th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s “Luckiest man” speech and George Steinbrenner’s 53rd birthday, Righetti threw a no-hitter against Red Sox. He finished with a strikeout against Wade Boggs, who was on his way to the first of his five batting titles.

Credit: AP

BOBBY MURCER WINS ONE FOR THURMAN MUNSON
YANKEE STADIUM, AUG. 6, 1979
The Yankees made the round trip to Canton, Ohio, earlier in day for the funeral of their captain. Murcer, one of Munson’s closest friends and one of last to speak with him the night before that fatal plane crash, hit a three-run homer in the seventh to cut the Orioles' lead to 4-3 and hit a two-run walk-off single in ninth.

Credit: AP

ROGER MARIS’ 61ST HOME RUN
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 1, 1961
Yankees rightfielder Maris broke the gold standard, Babe Ruth’s 60 home runs in 1927, on a fourth-inning drive against Red Sox starter Tracy Stallard. Sal Durante, a 19-year-old truck driver, caught the ball, received a $5,000 reward and set the standard for future collectibles craze.

Credit: AP

REGGIE JACKSON’S THREE HOME RUNS IN GAME 6
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 18, 1977
Overcoming a benching in the American League Championship Series finale, Jackson burnished his "Mr. October" reputation with homers on three successive Dodgers pitches. The Yankees won their first title in 15 years with enough stories to fill a book, “The Bronx Zoo,” and a miniseries, “The Bronx is Burning.”

Credit: Newsday / Paul J. Bereswill

DEREK JETER’S BLOODY CHIN
YANKEE STADIUM, JULY 1, 2004
With a Red Sox runner on third in the 12th inning, Jeter caught Trot Nixon’s pop on a dead run, went head first into the stands and smashed his face, requiring a trip to hospital. The Yankees won, 5-4, in the 13th on John Flaherty’s single.

Credit: AP

DAVID CONE’S PERFECT GAME
YANKEE STADIUM, JULY 18, 1999
Don Larsen threw out the ceremonial first pitch on Yogi Berra Day, in honor of the battery in his 1956 perfect game. Cone joked that the two should hug as they did at end of that game. After retiring 27 Expos, Cone hugged catcher Joe Girardi. The game was attended by broadcaster Bob Wolff, who had called Larsen’s game.

Credit: AP

DODGERS, FINALLY
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 4, 1955
World Series MVP Johnny Podres pitches a Game 7 shutout, with help from a running catch by Sandy Amoros in the leftfield corner, as the Dodgers beat the Yankees for Brooklyn’s only title.

Credit: Allsport

DAVE MLICKI’S GEM
YANKEE STADIUM, JUNE 16, 1997
In the first Mets-Yankees game that ever counted, the Mets' Dave Mlicki throws a shutout against the world champions before a juiced crowd of 56,188. In the ninth inning, before Mlicki scooped up a clump of mound dirt that he still has, the only sound at Yankee Stadium was "Let’s Go Mets!"

Credit: AP

DROPPED THIRD STRIKE
EBBETS FIELD, OCT. 5, 1941
With two outs in the ninth inning of World Series Game 4 and the Dodgers ahead 4-3, Brooklyn catcher Mickey Owen, far right, misplayed a third strike, allowing Tommy Henrich to reach first. The Yankees scored four runs and went on to win World Series in five games.

Credit: AP

MANTLE INJURES KNEE
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 5, 1951
Four innings after getting his first World Series hit, rightfielder Mickey Mantle was chasing a fly ball by fellow rookie Willie Mays of the Giants, caught his spike on an outfield drain and wrenched his knee (seen here in the hospital the day after). The knee would trouble him throughout his Hall of Fame career.

Credit: AP

BEVENS’ NEAR NO-NO
EBEBTS FIELD, OCT. 3, 1947
In World Series Game 4, Yankees journeyman Bill Bevens was one out from the first no-hitter in postseason. But Dodgers pinch-hitter Cookie Lavagetto hit a two-run double for 3-2 win.

Credit: AP

BILLY MARTIN’S GRAB
EBBETS FIELD, OCT. 7, 1952
With bases loaded and two outs in the seventh inning of Game 7 of the World Series, Yankees second baseman Martin raced near the mound and caught a tough wind-tossed pop by Jackie Robinson to preserve the Yankees’ 4-2 lead.

Credit: AP

MATT FRANCO GAME
SHEA STADIUM, JULY 10, 1999
A minor-leaguer for 10 years before becoming a Mets sub, Franco hit a two-out, two-strike, two-run pinch single off Mariano Rivera in the ninth for a 9-8 win. Manager Bobby Valentine, asked to name a more exciting regular season game, said, “I can’t remember one.”

Credit: Newsday / John Paraskevas

CLEMENS BEANS PIAZZA
Yankee Stadium, July 8, 2000
In the second half of a two-stadium doubleheader (after Dwight Gooden won as a Yankee at Shea), Roger Clemens hit Mike Piazza in the head with a fastball that had repercussions in the World Series (another confrontation) and when Clemens batted against the Mets in 2002 (Shawn Estes threw behind him).

Credit: AP

YANKEES WIN IT IN 12TH
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 21, 2000: In their first World Series meeting, Timo Perez hesitates and gets thrown out at home on Todd Zeile’s sixth-inning double, Yankees score in ninth against Armando Benitez, former Met Jose Vizcaino singles with two outs in 12th for 4-3 victory.

Credit: SNY

CASTILLO DROPS IT
YANKEE STADIUM, JUNE 12, 2009
Alex Rodriguez’ soft, apparent game-ending pop was dropped by three-time Gold Glove second baseman Luis Castillo, allowing Derek Jeter and Mark Teixeira to score for a 9-8 Yankees win. “As soon as I slid in,’’ Teixeira said, “I hugged Jete and I said, ‘What just happened?’"

Credit: AP

WILLIE MAYS AND 'THE CATCH'
SEPT. 29, 1954
At the Polo Grounds, Willie Mays raced to the 483-foot sign in centerfield on Vic Wertz's liner in the 8th inning of a 2-2 World Series opener and made the most famous catch ever. And his perfect throw prevented the Indians' Larry Doby from scoring from second.

Credit: AP

ROBERTO CLEMENTE’S 3,000TH HIT
THREE RIVERS STADIUM, PITTSBURGH, SEPT. 30, 1972
A fourth-inning double against the Mets’ Jon Matlack allowed Clemente to finish the season with exactly 3,000 hits (becoming the 11th player to reach the plateau). It was also his last official at-bat. On Dec. 31, Clemente died in a plane crash while trying to help victims of a Nicaraguan earthquake.

BABE RUTH’S CALLED SHOT
WRIGLEY FIELD: OCT. 1, 1932
The Cubs had erected a temporary second level of bleachers because of demand to see Ruth, far right, who gestured three times either to Cubs pitcher Charlie Root or to the bleachers. Catcher Gabby Hartnett was among those who said Ruth really did call his shot on home run during bitter World Series Game 3.

Credit: AP

LOU GEHRIG?S SPEECH
YANKEE STADIUM, JULY 4, 1939
Seemingly indestructible ?Iron Horse,? diagnosed with fatal illness, has his No. 4 retired and tearfully tells crowd ?I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.?

Credit: AP

715TH HOME RUN FOR HANK AARON
ATLANTA FULTON COUNTY STADIUM: APRIL 8, 1974
For decades, Babe Ruth’s 714 career home runs was the most hallowed record in sports. Aaron surpassed it with a shot to left field off the Dodgers’ Al Downing. Although Aaron’s record eventually was broken in the steroids era, many fans still consider him true home run king.

Credit: AP

TED WILLIAMS HOMERS IN FINAL AT-BAT
FENWAY PARK, SEPT. 28, 1960
Williams, 42, announced he wouldn’t play final two games in New York. Had number retired before Wednesday afternoon game attended by 10,454. In eighth, drove Jack Fisher fastball to right-centerfield bullpen in scene immortalized by John Updike’s New Yorker essay, “Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu.”

RICKEY HENDERSON STEALS A RECORD
OAKLAND COLISEUM, MAY 1, 1991
Henderson stole third against Yankees to surpass Lou Brock?s mark of 938 career steals, then uprooted the base and held it over his head. In impromptu ceremony, Henderson said, ?Lou Brock was a symbol of great base stealing, but today I am the greatest of all time.?

Credit: AP

CAL RIPKEN JR. PLAYS 2,131ST CONSECUTIVE GAME
CAMDEN YARDS, BALTIMORE, SEPT. 6, 1995
Orioles shortstop breaks Lou Gehrig’s durability record, a quest that some called baseball’s salvation after 1994 work stoppage. Joe DiMaggio said during postgame ceremony, “Wherever my old teammate Lou Gehrig is today, I’m sure he’s tipping his cap to you, Cal Ripken.”

Credit: AP

CARL HUBBELL?S ALL-STAR STRIKEOUTS
POLO GROUNDS, JULY 10, 1934
Hubbell, pioneer of the screwball and Giants? ?Meal Ticket,? started second All-Star Game shakily, allowing single and walk. Then struck out five future Hall of Famers in a row: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons, Joe Cronin.

Credit: AP

BARRY BONDS BECOMES CONTROVERSIAL HOME RUN KING
AT & T PARK, SAN FRANCISCO, AUG. 7, 2007
Like Mark McGwire’s 62nd homer in 1998, Bonds’ career No. 756 gets an asterisk in minds of many who are skeptical of totals in steroids era. Still, it was quite a scene when Bonds went deep against Nationals’ Mike Bacsik.

Credit: National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum

MERKLE’S BONER
POLO GROUNDS, SEPT. 23, 1908
Although an umpire reportedly told him he didn’t have to touch second on an apparent walk-off hit against the Cubs, Giants sub Fred Merkle, a teenage rookie, was called out. The Cubs went on to win the pennant and World Series — which they haven’t done again since then.

Credit: AP

DAVE WINFIELD VENTURES INTO FOWL TERRITORY
TORONTO, AUG. 4, 1983
Warming up before bottom of the fifth, Yankees centerfielder hit and killed a seagull. Winfield was arrested for cruelty to animals. Charge was dropped, but Winfield returned in offseason to donate paintings for charity.

Credit: AP

WASHINGTON SENATORS FORFEIT THEIR LAST GAME
SEPT. 30, 1971
Two outs in the ninth, Senators ahead of Yankees, 7-5, Joe Grzenda on the mound and Horace Clarke at the plate. Fans, angered that team was moving to Texas 11 years after original Senators fled to Minnesota, stormed field and wouldn’t leave.

Credit: AP

MUSIC DEPRECIATION NIGHT
BROOKLYN, AUG. 13, 1951
Bring an instrument, get in free offer attracted kazoos, drums and one piano among 2,426. Ebbets Field did not rival Carnegie Hall that night. Dodgers publicist Irving Rudd said the sound “must have traumatized music lovers for miles around.”

Credit: AP

THE PINE TAR GAME
YANKEE STADIUM, JULY 24, 1983
Eyes bulging, George Brett raced from Royals dugout after being ruled out — his game-changing homer disallowed — because of excessive pine tar on his bat. But Royals’ subsequent protest was upheld, homer was restored and Kansas City won, 5-4.

Credit: AP

EDDIE GAEDEL BATS
AUG. 19, 1951
In his signature stunt, promotions genius and St. Louis Browns owner Bill Veeck hired 3-foot-7 circus performer to show a minuscule strike zone and draw a walk against Tigers pitcher Bobby Cain (who tossed two underhanded). Veeck reportedly had warned Gaedel about snipers in the stands if he even thought about swinging.

Credit: AP

TEN-CENT BEER NIGHT
MUNICIPAL STADIUM, CLEVELAND. JUNE 4, 1974
Indians’ thirst for attendance inspired sales of 8-ounce beers for a dime a pop. Stands were fuller than usual, but so were fans. Raucous turned to riotous, rocks and chairs were thrown. Game was forfeited to Rangers and all future Ten Cent Beer Nights were canceled.

Credit: AP

TIGERS? PICKUP TEAM LOSES, 24-2
PHILADELPHIA, MAY 18, 1912
Tiger players were angered that Ty Cobb (above) was suspended for beating up a heckler in New York, so they refused to play the next game against the Athletics. The team rounded up a sandlot team and got thrashed.

Credit: Newsday file

FANS MANAGERS NIGHT
ST. LOUIS, AUG. 24, 1951
Bill Veeck (above) distributed YES and NO placards to fans at a Browns game vs. the Athletics, allowing them to make strategy decisions. PR man Bob Fishel held up signs asking advice such as “Warm up pitcher?” and “Infield back?” Fans voted with their placards, and the Browns won, 5-3.

Credit: AP

DISCO DEMOLITION NIGHT
COMISKEY PARK, CHICAGO, JULY 12, 1979
Anti-disco music deejay Steve Dahl suggested a promotion: 98-cent admission if you brought a disco record to be destroyed. Dahl blew up a bin between doubleheader games, provoking a riot and forfeit. David Phillips, above, was an umpire crew chief that night.

Credit: Library of Congress

YANKEE STADIUM OPENS
APRIL 18, 1923
Baseball had never seen such a colussus. “Some ballyard, huh?” said Babe Ruth, who naturally had the first home run in opener against Red Sox. John Philip Sousa personally led band in national anthem.

Credit: AP (April 15, 1947)

JACKIE ROBINSON’S DEBUT
April 15, 1947, Ebbets Field
No sporting event had a greater impact on the U.S. than Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier and becoming the the first African-American major-leaguer. On the 50th anniversary, with Robinson’s widow, Rachel, and President Bill Clinton present at Shea Stadium, commissioner Bud Selig retired Robinson’s No. 42 throughout Major League Baseball.

Credit: AP

FIRST NIGHT GAME
MAY 24, 1935, CINCINNATI
FDR hit a gold telegraph key in White House, signaling someone to throw switch for 632 lights at Crosley Field. Jimmy Wilson, manager of losing Phils (2-1), said, “Night baseball is all right, if the fans want it, but I’d rather play in daytime.”

Credit: AP

FIRST INDOOR GAME
HOUSTON ASTRODOME, APRIL 9, 1965
President Lyndon B. Johnson attended the Yankees-Astros exhibition. Mickey Mantle, who batted leadoff and hit a single (later hitting the first home run), said, “It reminds me of what I imagine my first ride would be like in a flying saucer.”

Credit: AP

FIRST BLACK MANAGER
APRIL 8, 1975
Frank Robinson became the first African-American manager, and his home run in his debut as player/manager for the Cleveland Indians helped beat the Yankees, 5-3. He recalled having thought as he rounded third, "Will miracles never cease?"

Credit: AP

THE FIRST DH
APRIL 6, 1973, FENWAY PARK
Felipe Alou was the regular designated hitter in spring training, but Ron Blomberg had a pulled hamstring and couldn’t play first base on Opening Day. He had a bases-loaded walk. Stranded on first after third out, he asked coach Elston Howard, “What do I do?”

Credit: Chicago Tribune

FIRST ALL-STAR GAME
COMISKEY PARK, JULY 6, 1933
Chicago Tribune sports editor Arch Ward devised what he thought would be a one-time exhibition to complement World’s Fair. Babe Ruth, naturally, had the first home run.

Credit: AP

FIRST WORLD SERIES GAME
BOSTON, OCT. 1, 1903
Pittsburgh Pirates of the established National League faced Boston Pilgrims of the upstart American League. Cy Young lost Game 1, 7-3, but Boston won best-of-nine, 5-3, and a tradition was born—sort of. Giants refused to face the “minor league” in ’04.

Credit: AP

FIRST WEST COAST GAME
SAN FRANCISCO, APRIL 15, 1958
The Dodgers and Giants, bitter rivals who had moved from New York together, played before 23,448 at Seals Stadium. San Francisco native Gino Cimoli led off for LA with a strikeout against Ruben Gomez in Giants’ 8-0 win.

Credit: Getty/Rogers Archive

FIRST WORLD SERIES NIGHT GAME
PITTSBURGH, OCT. 13, 1971
A single by Milt May, above, in the seventh-inning helped the Pirates beat the Orioles, 4-3. The game lasted only 2 hours, 48 minutes. It caught on, leading to the inevitable: The last World Series day game, Oct. 24, 1987.

Credit: AP

JOHNNY VANDER MEER’S SECOND CONSECUTIVE NO-HITTER
EBBETS FIELD, JUNE 15, 1938
Four days after he no-hit Casey Stengel’s Boston Bees, Vander Meer did it again during first night game in Brooklyn history, with Babe Ruth and Jesse Owens among 38,748 attendees. Dodgers loaded bases with walks in ninth, but player/manager Leo Durocher lined to center for final out.

Credit: Library of Congress/Bain Collection

DOUBLE NO-HITTER
MAY 2, 1917
Hippo Vaughn (pictured here in 1914) of the Chicago Cubs and Fred Toney of the Reds each threw a no-hitter for nine innings at Weeghman Park (later Wrigley Field). Larry Kopf got the first hit in the top of the 10th and scored. Toney completed the gem with a perfect 10th.

Credit: AP

HARD-LUCK HARVEY HADDIX THROWS 12 PERFECT INNINGS
MILWAUKEE COUNTY STADIUM, MAY 26, 1959
The Pirates' Haddix struck out Braves pitcher Lew Burdetter in the ninth, but Burdette also had pitched a shutout, sending the game to extra inning. Haddix threw three more perfect innings before losing on an infield error and a home run by Joe Adcock in the 13th.

SHORE'S PERFECT GAME IN RELIEF
FENWAY PARK, JUNE 23, 1917
Red Sox starting pitcher Babe Ruth was ejected for punching the umpire over a leadoff walk in the first, and Shore came on in relief. The runner was caught stealing, and Shore retired the next 26 Washington batters. Officially declared a no-hitter by rules committee in 1991.

Credit: AP

SANDY KOUFAX PERFECT, BOB HENDLEY TOSSES ONE-HITTER
DODGER STADIUM, SEPT. 9, 1965
Lou Johnson was the day's only baserunner, reaching on a walk in the fifth and later scoring on a throwing error, then having the game's only hit, a bloop double off the Cubs' Hendley in the seventh. Koufax' fourth no-hitter finished in 1 hour, 43 minutes.

Credit: AP

ROGER CLEMENS’ SECOND 20-STRIKEOUT GAME
TIGER STADIUM, DETROIT, SEPT. 18, 1996
Clemens, a 34-year-old in his third to last game with Red Sox, struck out Travis Fryman for final out, tying his own single-game major-league record set against Mariners 10 years earlier.

Credit: AP

WARREN SPAHN-JUAN MARICHAL DOUBLE SHUTOUT THROUGH 15 INNINGS
CANDLESTICK PARK, JULY 2, 1963
No relievers were needed through 4 hours, 10 minutes of work by two Hall of Famers, 42-year-old Spahn of the Braves and 25-year-old Marichal of the Giants. The game ended 1-0 on a Willie Mays home run in the 16th.

Credit: AP

KERRY WOOD’S 20-STRIKEOUT GAME
WRIGLEY FIELD, MAY 6, 1998
Wood, a Cubs rookie making his fifth start, allowed only two Astros to reach base in 2-0 win, one on an infield hit by Ricky Gutierrez and one a hit batsman.

Credit: AP

ARMANDO GALARRAGA’S 28-OUT “PERFECT” GAME
COMERICA PARK, DETROIT, JUNE 2, 2010
First base umpire Jim Joyce profusely and repeatedly apologized for blowing the call that cost the Tigers' pitcher a perfect game. Galarraga, who retired the next Indians batter, graciously accepted. Pitcher and umpire co-authored book, “Nobody’s Perfect” to be released this spring.

Credit: AP

GIANTS-REDS 21-INNING 1-0 GAME
CROSLEY FIELD, CINCINNATI, SEPT. 1, 1967
Gaylord Perry pitched 16 innings of shutout ball but got the no-decision. Bob Lee, the Reds’ fourth pitcher, allowed the only run on a bases-loaded walk to Dick Groat.

Credit: AP

DODGERS-GIANTS
POLO GROUNDS, OCT. 3, 1951
Game 3 of the NL playoff series technically was a regular-season game. Realistically, “The Shot Heard 'Round the World” was the most famous moment in baseball history, with Bobby Thomson rounding the bases as Russ Hodges shouted, “The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!”

Credit: AP

BUCKY DENT?S HOME RUN
FENWAY PARK, OCT. 2, 1978
Dent's three-run shot in the seventh gave the Yankees a 3-2 lead, extending what was seen as The Curse of the Bambino and cementing a decades-long rivalry.

Credit: AP

GAME 7, NLCS
ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY STADIUM, OCT. 14, 1992
The Braves trailed, 2-0,entering the ninth inning. With two out and the Pirates leading 2-1, pinch-hitter Francisco Cabrera singles sharply to left, and Sid Bream (at the bottom of the pile above) lumbers home with the winning run, just beating the throw from Barry Bonds. Watch the play

Credit: AP

GAME 6, NLCS
WRIGLEY FIELD, OCT. 14, 2003
If you’re Steve Bartman, this is a Game You Should NOT Have Seen. The Cubs fan got in the way of Moises Alou fielding a foul pop when the team was five outs away from first its World Series since 1945. He is vilified by, among many others, Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich. Watch the play

Credit: Newsday / David L. Pokress

AARON BOONE’S HR
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 16, 2003
The Yankees had erased a 5-2 deficit in the eighth inning of ALCS Game 7 against Red Sox ace Pedro Martinez. In the 11th, after three scoreless innings by Mariano Rivera, Boone went deep against Tim Wakefield, extending The Curse.

Credit: GETTY

THE BLOODY SOCK
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 19, 2004
Pitching with what appeared to be blood seeping through his stocking from an ankle injury, Curt Schilling pitched seven strong innings in ALCS Game 6 and helped Boston rally from a 3-0 deficit in games and ultimately win their first World Series in 86 years.

Credit: AP (Sep. 12, 2007)

2007 NL WILD CARD PLAYOFF
COORS FIELD, DENVER, OCT. 1, 2007
The Rockies capped a late-season comeback by overcoming a two-run deficit against the Padres in the 13th inning. Matt Holliday scored the winning run on a controversial slide at home, with many observers believing he never did touch the plate.

Credit: MCT

2009 AL CENTRAL PLAYOFF
METRODOME, MINNEAPOLIS, OCT. 6, 2009
Tigers went ahead in the 10th inning, then the Twins tied it. The Tigers believed they went ahead again in the 12th as replays suggested Brandon Inge was hit by a pitch with the bases loaded, but the umpire said ball didn’t hit him. The Twins won in the bottom of the 12th on Alexi Casilla’s single and still, losing manager Jim Leyland said, “It was just a great baseball game.”

Credit: AP

GAME 6, NLCS
ASTRODOME, OCT. 15, 1986
For 4 hours, 42 minutes, the pressure was on the Mets because Astros unhittable ace Mike Scott was lurking for Game 7. Each side scored in 14th. The Mets scored three, allowed two in 16th, stranding the tying run at second and reached the World Series.

Credit: MCT

ROY HALLADAY’S NO-HITTER
CITIZENS BANK PARK, PHILADELPHIA, OCT. 6, 2010
Having thrown the 20th perfect game in major-league history in May, Halladay shut down the Reds in Game 1 of the National League Division Series and becamethe fifth ever to have two no-hitters in one year (first since Nolan Ryan in 1973).

Credit: Bettman Archive


DON LARSEN’S PERFECTO
YANKEE STADIUM, OCT. 8, 1956
Among those who did see Game 5 was 16-year-old Joe Torre, sitting in the stands, long before he would manage Yankees to four World Series titles and witnessed two of his pitchers throw perfect games. The Dodgers’ Sal Maglie pitched a five-hitter that day, and Mickey Mantle homered.

Credit: AP

ENOS SLAUGHTER'S MAD DASH
SPORTSMAN’S PARK, ST. LOUIS, OCT. 15, 1946
The Red Sox had tied Game 7 at 3 with Dom DiMaggio’s two-run hit in the top of the eighth, but DiMaggio pulled a hamstring. With two out in the bottom of eighth, Slaughter raced home from first on Harry Walker’s single as Johnny Pesky flubbed the relay from substitute centerfielder Leon Culberson.

Credit: AP

BILL MAZEROSKI’S HOME RUN
FORBES FIELD, PITTSBURGH. OCT. 13, 1960
Still the only Game 7 ever decided by a walk-off homer. The Yankees scored two in the ninth to tie (and outscored Pirates 55-27 in Series), but Mazeroski probably sealed his Hall of Fame status with a shot against Ralph Terry. The long-lost full-game tape materialized in 2010 in Bing Crosby’s wine cellar.

Credit: AP

BOBBY RICHARDSON CATCHES WILLIE MCCOVEY’S LINER
CANDLESTICK PARK, SAN FRANCISCO, OCT. 16, 1962
This time, Ralph Terry was the winning pitcher and MVP. The Yankees' second baseman snared a smash by the Giants' cleanup hitter with runners on second and third, two outs in the ninth inning of Game 7. The 1-0 win clinched the last title for the original Yankees dynasty. McCovey would be a part of celebration after Giants finally won 48 years later.

Credit: AP

THE BILL BUCKNER GAME
SHEA STADIUM, OCT. 25, 1986.
Mets' two-out rally already had tied game (after Red Sox scored two in top of 10th) and Game 6 appeared headed for 11th inning when Mookie Wilson hit slow roller to first. Then, in words of Mets announcer Bob Murphy, ?The ball gets by Buckner!?

Credit: AP

CARLTON FISK’S HOME RUN
FENWAY PARK. OCT. 21, 1975
The sight of Fisk leaping up and down near the plate, waving the ball fair in the 12th inning of Game 6 against the Reds became one of most iconic in sports. Before 2005 interleague game against the Reds, the Red Sox officially renamed the tower atop Green Monster the Fisk Foul Pole.

Credit: AP

KIRK GIBSON ENDS GAME 1
DODGER STADIUM. OCT. 15, 1988
The walk-off, one-handed, pinch-hit two-run homer by Dodger player who could barely walk. As Jack Buck said on CBS radio, “I don’t believe what I just saw!” The Game 2 telecast began with montage of Gibson’s homer interspersed with clips from the climactic scene in “The Natural.”

Credit: AP

JOE CARTER’S HOME RUN
SKYDOME, TORONTO, OCT. 23, 1993
With the Blue Jays down, 6-5, in the ninth inning of Game 6, Carter laced a 2-2 pitch from Phillies closer Mitch Williams and leaped three times before he reached first. The second Series-ending homer in history drove home Hall of Famers Rickey Henderson and Paul Molitor.

Credit: AP

MARLINS WIN GAME 7 IN 11
PRO PLAYER STADIUM, MIAMI, OCT. 26, 1997
After the Marlins tied Game 7 with a run in ninth, Edgar Renteria beat the Indians with a two-out single in the 11th (Renteria would also get winning hit in 2010 World Series).

Credit: Newsday / Paul J. Bereswill

DEREK JETER BECOMES MR. NOVEMBER
YANKEE STADIUM, NOV. 1, 2001
The postseason was delayed by the aftermath of 9/11, and Game 4 between the Diamondbacks and Yankees beganon Oct. 31 and went past midnight after Tino Martinez tied it with a two-out homer off Byung-Hyun Kim in the ninth. Jeter won it with another homer against Kim after midnight. It was the first time the World Series reached November and first time a team tied the score in the ninth with a homer and won in the 10th with a homer.

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