The San Diego Padres take on the Mets during Opening...

The San Diego Padres take on the Mets during Opening Day at Citi Field on April 13, 2009. Credit: Getty Images / Chris McGrath

The Mets once again are considering whether to make pitcher-friendly Citi Field a kinder, happier, and cozier place for hitters.

Mets general manager Sandy Alderson told reporters on Monday that the club is discussing moving in the fences at the six-year-old ballpark, just as they did following the 2011 season.

Talks have been ongoing for some time, according to a team insider. The changes don’t seem to be as large in scope as the ones made after 2011. Not surprisingly, the focus appears to be on adjusting right-centerfield, the deepest part of Citi Field.

The fence in rightcenter is 398 feet away from home plate, down from the original 415 feet, though it still requires tons of power to clear the wall.

“It’s something that we had talked about the possibility in the past and we continue to look at it,” Alderson told reporters. “We brought the fences in a couple years ago. It’s not about tailoring the ballpark to a particular player or a particular composition of team, it’s about making Citi Field as fan-friendly and as exciting as we can make it.”

Changes to rightcenter would prove to be particularly advantageous to slugger Curtis Granderson, who has struggled at Citi Field in the first year of a four-year, $60-million deal. Alderson told the New York Post that under the new dimensions, Granderson might have had seven more homers this season.

After moving in their fences the first time, the Mets hit more homers, exactly as they had wished. And as Alderson noted recently, teams that win the home run battle often go onto win the game. But part of that equation also involves whether pitchers can prevent homers.

Anyway, we’ll have more on this later. But, ultimately, it’s important to keep in mind that moving in fences can have undesired effects.

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