A study from the Conference Board found that only 4%...

A study from the Conference Board found that only 4% of CEOs and only 1% of chief human resources managers “will prioritize bringing workers back to the office full time." Credit: Getty Images / Morsa Images



While some high-profile companies are demanding that their remote employees return to the office, this is a low priority for most top executives. A study from the Conference Board found that only 4% of CEOs and only 1% of chief human resources managers “will prioritize bringing workers back to the office full time.” Meanwhile, 27% of CEOs were “focused on maintaining their hybrid work models.”

'A.I.-enhanced' cybercrime soars

Cyberattacks are rising as criminals add artificial intelligence to their toolbox. A study by security software maker Acronis concluded that “A.I.-enhanced” phishing email attacks soared 222% last year compared with the second half of 2022. Cybercriminals are using popular A.I. programs such as ChatGPT to “increase cyberattack efficiency, create malicious code and automate attacks,” Acronis said.
A separate report from Britain’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) found that A.I. is being used by all types of cybercriminals, from highly trained government-aligned groups to less-skilled individual hackers, making their attacks “more effective, efficient and harder to detect.”
The NCSC predicts ransomware demands will surge over the next two years mainly because A.I. makes it easier for novice cybercriminals and hackers-for-hire to launch cyberattacks.

Rice is wrong recipe for wet phones

In a new support document, Apple says putting a wet...

In a new support document, Apple says putting a wet iPhone in rice could damage it. Credit: Getty Images / Arthit Pornpikanet

The conventional wisdom is if your smartphone gets wet, covering it with uncooked rice will dry it out. But the conventional wisdom may not be so smart. In a new support document, Apple says putting a wet iPhone in rice could damage it. Instead, Apple says tap the phone against your hand with the connector facing down to remove liquid, and then put the phone in a “dry area with some airflow.”

Wyze camera glitch exposes sensitive content

Around 13,000 Wyze home security camera customers were able to...

Around 13,000 Wyze home security camera customers were able to see sensitive content from strangers’ devices following a Feb. 16 service outage. Credit: Sipa USA via AP / Gado Images

Around 13,000 Wyze home security camera customers were able to see sensitive content from strangers’ devices following a Feb. 16 service outage. When cameras came back online, customers saw thumbnails from other people’s feeds in their apps, and some clicked through to see videos. Wyze said device IDs and user ID mapping were mixed up, leading to some people having access to data from the wrong accounts. — THE WASHINGTON POST

In a new support document, Apple says putting a wet...

In a new support document, Apple says putting a wet iPhone in rice could damage it. Credit: Getty Images / Arthit Pornpikanet

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