Jade Council, 7, and her brother, Evan, 5, from Brentwood,...

Jade Council, 7, and her brother, Evan, 5, from Brentwood, choose their apples at Mill Neck Manor's annual Apple Festival when it took place in-person in 2018. Credit: Linda Rosier

This fall, one of Long Island’s longest-running North Shore traditions is returning. Mill Neck Manor will bring back its annual Apple Festival Oct. 8 and 9 in full force after a two-year hiatus.

No visitor will go hungry as treats such as apple pies, apple cider, apple strudel, apple cider doughnuts, apple butter, apple fritters plus candied and caramel apples will be aplenty. Plus, of course, the mounds of freshly picked apples from the Hudson Valley for sale in forms of a half or full box featuring multiple flavors including McIntosh, Cortland, Honeycrisp, Empire and Gala.

The event — which serves as a fundraiser for the Mill Neck Family of Organizations providing services for deaf and hard of hearing in the incorporated village of Mill Neck — took place in a drive-thru format where guests remained in their cars while ordering apples and other to-go items for the past two seasons.

When it resumes in October, Long Islanders will get a mix of old favorites with some new additions.

“We are trying to keep it as traditional as possible while adding some things we think would make it even more enjoyable,” says Toula Ramey, director of Development and Communications. “The goal is not to change it too much from what people are used to.”

Upon entering the festival, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on both days, there’s a suggested donation of $20 per car. Mill Neck Family of Organizations is currently raising funds to help revive its building for the Day Habilitation Program for deaf and hard of hearing adults with developmental disabilities.

Guests can peruse a market of over 25 arts and crafts vendors selling everything from holiday decorations to handmade jewelry to specialty clothing and stop by food vendors selling fall eats like roasted corn on the cob, grilled bratwurst, hamburgers, hot dogs, French fries, ice cream, fudge and various flavored pickles. Take-home items include Karl Ehmer bratwurst, knackwurst and kielbasa as well as loaves of fresh bread, several cheeses, honey, jellies and jams.

The pumpkin patch will be open for kids to pick their own pumpkins and even pose for photo-ops plus take part in face painting, carnival games and sand art.

New this year will be charcuterie tutorials at the cheese house, live entertainment with bands, storytelling, American Sign Language classes and a pie-eating contest. Oyster Bay Brewing Company has even created a signature beer for Mill Neck called Mission True Pumpkin Brew, which will be sold in cans but not served. Additionally, tours of the Manor House are held four times each day.

“This year, we will offer entertainment that will be interpreted as well as ASL classes to communicate what we do,” says Ramey. “It helps spread the word about our mission.”

Mill Neck Manor has used apples as a tool for fundraising since 1951. At first, the event was simply known as the Apple Sale where people could purchase bushels of different varieties. With the help of the Locust Valley Rotary, the sale grew into a full-blown festival in the mid-1960s that included fresh apple cider, pumpkin picking, honey, candied apples and a pie-eating contest.

Today, the tradition continues with an expanded roster of activities all of which go toward supporting the Mill Neck Family of Organizations.

“It’s our major fundraiser,” says Chris Oddo, director of Community Outreach. “We have services for people who are deaf and hard of hearing starting with an infant program up to elder care for deaf adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. We want to ensure that deaf people experience the same opportunities as hearing people do.”

In addition to a community festival and fundraiser, the event also serves as a homecoming for alumni.

“There’s a lot of people that come who went to school here and they consider Mill Neck Manor their home. It’s very emotional for them,” says Oddo. “It’s a tradition of coming home to where you spent your formative years learning your language and gaining your culture.”

This fall, one of Long Island’s longest-running North Shore traditions is returning. Mill Neck Manor will bring back its annual Apple Festival Oct. 8 and 9 in full force after a two-year hiatus.

No visitor will go hungry as treats such as apple pies, apple cider, apple strudel, apple cider doughnuts, apple butter, apple fritters plus candied and caramel apples will be aplenty. Plus, of course, the mounds of freshly picked apples from the Hudson Valley for sale in forms of a half or full box featuring multiple flavors including McIntosh, Cortland, Honeycrisp, Empire and Gala.

The event — which serves as a fundraiser for the Mill Neck Family of Organizations providing services for deaf and hard of hearing in the incorporated village of Mill Neck — took place in a drive-thru format where guests remained in their cars while ordering apples and other to-go items for the past two seasons.

When it resumes in October, Long Islanders will get a mix of old favorites with some new additions.

“We are trying to keep it as traditional as possible while adding some things we think would make it even more enjoyable,” says Toula Ramey, director of Development and Communications. “The goal is not to change it too much from what people are used to.”

BLEND OF OLD AND NEW

Upon entering the festival, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on both days, there’s a suggested donation of $20 per car. Mill Neck Family of Organizations is currently raising funds to help revive its building for the Day Habilitation Program for deaf and hard of hearing adults with developmental disabilities.

Guests can peruse a market of over 25 arts and crafts vendors selling everything from holiday decorations to handmade jewelry to specialty clothing and stop by food vendors selling fall eats like roasted corn on the cob, grilled bratwurst, hamburgers, hot dogs, French fries, ice cream, fudge and various flavored pickles. Take-home items include Karl Ehmer bratwurst, knackwurst and kielbasa as well as loaves of fresh bread, several cheeses, honey, jellies and jams.

The pumpkin patch will be open for kids to pick their own pumpkins and even pose for photo-ops plus take part in face painting, carnival games and sand art.

New this year will be charcuterie tutorials at the cheese house, live entertainment with bands, storytelling, American Sign Language classes and a pie-eating contest. Oyster Bay Brewing Company has even created a signature beer for Mill Neck called Mission True Pumpkin Brew, which will be sold in cans but not served. Additionally, tours of the Manor House are held four times each day.

“This year, we will offer entertainment that will be interpreted as well as ASL classes to communicate what we do,” says Ramey. “It helps spread the word about our mission.”

OVER 70 YEARS OF HISTORY 

Mill Neck Manor has used apples as a tool for fundraising since 1951. At first, the event was simply known as the Apple Sale where people could purchase bushels of different varieties. With the help of the Locust Valley Rotary, the sale grew into a full-blown festival in the mid-1960s that included fresh apple cider, pumpkin picking, honey, candied apples and a pie-eating contest.

Today, the tradition continues with an expanded roster of activities all of which go toward supporting the Mill Neck Family of Organizations.

“It’s our major fundraiser,” says Chris Oddo, director of Community Outreach. “We have services for people who are deaf and hard of hearing starting with an infant program up to elder care for deaf adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. We want to ensure that deaf people experience the same opportunities as hearing people do.”

In addition to a community festival and fundraiser, the event also serves as a homecoming for alumni.

“There’s a lot of people that come who went to school here and they consider Mill Neck Manor their home. It’s very emotional for them,” says Oddo. “It’s a tradition of coming home to where you spent your formative years learning your language and gaining your culture.”

MILL NECK MANOR APPLE FESTIVAL

WHEN | WHERE 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Oct. 8 and 9, Mill Neck Manor, 40 Frost Mill Road, Mill Neck

INFO 516-922-4100, millneck.org

ADMISSION Suggested donation of $20 per car