Dr. Jamie Ullman will be named an honoree at the...

Dr. Jamie Ullman will be named an honoree at the Brain Injury Association of New York State's annual March On for Brain Injury Walk on Sept. 10. Credit: Dr. Jamie Ullman

A Great Neck-based doctor noted for her leadership, research and passion for treating patients with brain injuries will be the first Long Island neurosurgeon to be honored at a fundraiser next month.

Dr. Jamie Ullman, 57, will be named an honoree at the Brain Injury Association of New York State's annual March On for Brain Injury Walk on Sept. 10 at Eisenhower Park. Honorees at four different sites around the state will be recognized for their work in the community and commitment to the nonprofit's mission to educate and advocate for people and families impacted by brain injury. 

Ullman is director of neurotrauma at the Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery at North Shore University Hospital and leads Northwell's “Women in Neurosurgery” initiative. Female neurosurgeons from around the state raised more than $20,000 to build programs and networking events, said Kelly Wexlar, program director at the institute at Northwell. Wexlar said Northwell completed more than 4,500 neurosurgeries in 2021 across the state.

Ullman "exemplifies the dedication and professionalism that we look for in health care professionals as it pertains to the care of brain injury survivors in our state," Eileen Reardon, executive director of the association, said in a statement.

Ullman, who has more than 25 years of expertise in the field, also is a founding member of the concussion program at Northwell Health, which serves hundreds of people annually. 

“We found out that this type of concussion program filled a huge gap in both Nassau and Suffolk, and even in the Queens and Brooklyn areas,” Ullman told Newsday.

During her residency in neurosurgery and fellowship in neurosurgery critical care at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Ullman said she worked closely with brain injury patients, which turned into a passion for treating trauma patients.

“I found that you can do so much good for patients by treating them early and paying attention to the problems that happen after the time of injury by treating them with intensive care,” Ullman said. 

Ullman, who serves as a member of the Brain Injury Association’s board of directors, said an independent committee is put together to choose the recipients.

“Neurosurgeons are there at the beginning of the whole [process], and I think that’s important to recognize," Ullman said, adding, that "the longer care doesn't happen without the short-term immediate care.”

Patients and caregivers will be honored at the walk’s Long Island, Hudson Valley, New York City and Rochester locations.

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