Fulton Commons Care Center, a nursing home in East Meadow,...

Fulton Commons Care Center, a nursing home in East Meadow, on Dec. 13, 2022. Credit: Newsday/Steve Pfost

ALBANY — Attorney General Letitia James on Monday announced an $8.6 million settlement with the Fulton Commons Care Center nursing home, which James had accused of a “heinous record of resident abuse” as well as misuse of government funds by the owners for personal gain.

The settlement of James’ investigation includes guilty pleas to two misdemeanors assessed against the East Meadow nursing home as a corporation and several reforms intended to provide better care to residents who endured “despicable conditions,” according to James. The problems include sexual abuse, unexplained cuts, bruises and other injuries, and leaving residents alone. One woman had crawled from her wheelchair onto the floor seeking help as nearby staff failed to assist her, according to James.

The criminal charges were two counts of attempted falsifying business records, Class A misdemeanors, against the corporation, but not against the owners or operators. James said the corporation falsified business records related to a report after an employee or employees were accused of sexually abusing three residents. The corporation pleaded guilty and must pay a $5,000 fine and must assure compliance with the settlement of the civil suit brought by James.

James also said that between January 2018 and January 2022, the owners, including principal owner Moshe Kalter, paid themselves $14.9 million in “fraudulent, inflated rental payments” using government health care funding. The funds also paid fraudulent salaries for no-show jobs for Kalter’s eight adult children, who each held 1% ownership in the nursing home, James said.

“For years, residents at Fulton Commons endured despicable mistreatment that left them with traumatic injuries and humiliating living conditions while the owners and operator of the facility pocketed millions of dollars of taxpayer funds instead of investing in critical care,” James said.

There was no immediate comment from officials at Fulton Commons and its corporate office.

Under the settlement, the owners must pay up to $7 million for required reforms and $1.6 million to reimburse the Medicaid and Medicare health care systems, James said.

If Fulton Commons fails to comply with the settlement, the nursing home could be denied Medicaid funding. The terms of the settlement apply even if the nursing home is sold. Independent monitors paid for by the corporation will oversee health care and finances as part of the settlement.

Among the cases cited in the attorney general’s office investigation was the plight of a woman who was admitted to the nursing home after having a foot amputated as a result of diabetes. James said the woman’s call bell went unanswered and she missed doses of medication, and at other times sat in soiled briefs for prolonged periods. James said the woman’s remaining foot was later amputated after it developed an infection.

When the woman’s health care proxy attempted to see the woman, the nursing home staff said her condition wasn’t serious enough to merit a visit. The woman died less than two hours later, James said.

The attorney general’s hotline to make a confidential report about poor conditions or abuse and neglect at nursing homes is 833-249-8499.

ALBANY — Attorney General Letitia James on Monday announced an $8.6 million settlement with the Fulton Commons Care Center nursing home, which James had accused of a “heinous record of resident abuse” as well as misuse of government funds by the owners for personal gain.

The settlement of James’ investigation includes guilty pleas to two misdemeanors assessed against the East Meadow nursing home as a corporation and several reforms intended to provide better care to residents who endured “despicable conditions,” according to James. The problems include sexual abuse, unexplained cuts, bruises and other injuries, and leaving residents alone. One woman had crawled from her wheelchair onto the floor seeking help as nearby staff failed to assist her, according to James.

The criminal charges were two counts of attempted falsifying business records, Class A misdemeanors, against the corporation, but not against the owners or operators. James said the corporation falsified business records related to a report after an employee or employees were accused of sexually abusing three residents. The corporation pleaded guilty and must pay a $5,000 fine and must assure compliance with the settlement of the civil suit brought by James.

James also said that between January 2018 and January 2022, the owners, including principal owner Moshe Kalter, paid themselves $14.9 million in “fraudulent, inflated rental payments” using government health care funding. The funds also paid fraudulent salaries for no-show jobs for Kalter’s eight adult children, who each held 1% ownership in the nursing home, James said.

WHAT TO KNOW

  • Attorney General Letitia James announced an $8.6 million settlement with the Fulton Commons Care Center nursing home, which James had accused of resident abuse and misuse of government funds by the owners.
  • The settlement of James’ investigation includes guilty pleas to two misdemeanors assessed against the East Meadow nursing home as a corporation and several reforms intended to provide better care to residents.
  • James also said the owners paid themselves $14.9 million in “fraudulent, inflated rental payments” using government health care funding between January 2018 and January 2022.

“For years, residents at Fulton Commons endured despicable mistreatment that left them with traumatic injuries and humiliating living conditions while the owners and operator of the facility pocketed millions of dollars of taxpayer funds instead of investing in critical care,” James said.

There was no immediate comment from officials at Fulton Commons and its corporate office.

Under the settlement, the owners must pay up to $7 million for required reforms and $1.6 million to reimburse the Medicaid and Medicare health care systems, James said.

If Fulton Commons fails to comply with the settlement, the nursing home could be denied Medicaid funding. The terms of the settlement apply even if the nursing home is sold. Independent monitors paid for by the corporation will oversee health care and finances as part of the settlement.

Among the cases cited in the attorney general’s office investigation was the plight of a woman who was admitted to the nursing home after having a foot amputated as a result of diabetes. James said the woman’s call bell went unanswered and she missed doses of medication, and at other times sat in soiled briefs for prolonged periods. James said the woman’s remaining foot was later amputated after it developed an infection.

When the woman’s health care proxy attempted to see the woman, the nursing home staff said her condition wasn’t serious enough to merit a visit. The woman died less than two hours later, James said.

The attorney general’s hotline to make a confidential report about poor conditions or abuse and neglect at nursing homes is 833-249-8499.

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