South Africa fans, part of a crowd of over 14,000,...

South Africa fans, part of a crowd of over 14,000, sing and cheer their side to victory Saturday over the Netherlands in Eisenhower Park. Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams Jr.

The familiar blue jersey worn by fans of India was frequently spotted Saturday among the throngs of spectators wearing orange for Netherlands and green and yellow of South Africa.

As Netherlands and South Africa squared off in the Group D World Cup match at Nassau County International Cricket Stadium, many of the fans and stadium workers had their sights set on the showdown looming Sunday: Pakistan vs. India and an expected capacity crowd of 34,000.

Harrison Warnock summed up the expectation for Sunday in one word: "crazy."

Warnock, 23, of Baldwin, worked at a merchandise tent where boxes of jerseys were tucked behind the counter in advance of Sunday's match.

He said the boxes contained nearly all India jerseys with the Dream 11 logo.

“We have a feeling that they will all be sold out,” he said.

Brian Schedrow shops with son Evan, 12, in the clothing and memorabilia...

Brian Schedrow shops with son Evan, 12, in the clothing and memorabilia store at cricket stadium. Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams Jr.

Saturday's match drew a crowd of 14,167 as South Africa defeated Netherlands by 4 wickets for its second tournament win to seize first place in its group. South Africa's David Miller was the Player of the Match.

Despite Pakistan's shocking loss to the United States this week, the matchup against India is expected to be the highlight of the International Cricket Council Men's T20 World Cup at the temporary stadium in East Meadow.

Approximately 200 media members have been accredited for Sunday’s match, according to tournament officials.

Mark Jones, an ICC spokesman in the United States, said in a text message, “It will be like nothing you’ve ever seen tomorrow.”

As of Saturday afternoon, a small selection of tickets were still available on the official ICC website starting at $2,500 for the premium club lounge. A handful of diamond club tickets remained at $10,000 per seat.

On the secondary ticket market, the cheapest seats available on StubHub and SeatGeek approached $1,000 Saturday afternoon.

Manoj Moudgalya, 26, a native of India now living in Brooklyn, said he grew up playing cricket — his favorite sport — and Saturday was his first chance to see the tournament in New York since he came to the United States about seven or eight years ago.

He would have preferred attending Sunday’s marquee matchup but said the prices were “exorbitant.”

“The way that they’re priced, I think it’s ridiculous,” he said.

Instead, he’ll attend a watch party in Manhattan.

Amar Patel, 45, of New Jersey, wearing a blue India jersey, walked along the stadium concourse shortly after Saturday’s match began. He plans to host a party at home Sunday with about 20 people, he said.

His 14-year-old son, Shaan, who plays in a cricket club, was one of 25 kids from the club to participate as a flag bearer prior to Saturday’s match, carrying the flag of Netherlands.

He said Sunday’s tickets were “too pricey” and he preferred the less crowded atmosphere Saturday.

Brooke Ballard, working at a beverage stand Saturday, was looking forward...

Brooke Ballard, working at a beverage stand Saturday, was looking forward to bigger crowds. Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams Jr.

Brooke Ballard, 21, of Inwood, who was working her third day of the tournament at a beverage stand selling beer, was looking forward to the bigger crowd.

"It's been slow," she said from her booth on the opposite side of the stadium from where most fans congregated. "And time is moving by slow."

She said before the tournament started her mother told her to expect Sunday to be the busiest day.

Security guard Roman Saey, of Manhattan, said he wasn't working Sunday.

"I wish," he said.

Even for new fans to cricket, the excitement for Sunday was palpable.

“I wish I could go to the India-Pakistan game,” said 12-year-old Evan Schedrow, who was attending his first-ever cricket game with his father, Brian.

A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports. Credit: Newsday/Daddona / Pfost / Villa Loarca

Uncovering the truth about the chemical drums A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports.

A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports. Credit: Newsday/Daddona / Pfost / Villa Loarca

Uncovering the truth about the chemical drums A tipster says he told the state about buried drums at Bethpage Community Park nearly a decade ago. Newsday's Ken Buffa reports.

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