Amityville Village Hall is shown here on Feb. 25, 2014.

Amityville Village Hall is shown here on Feb. 25, 2014. Credit: Steve Pfost

The Village of Amityville is bringing back an Independence Day tradition that has been absent for seven years.

The village’s annual July 3 evening celebration was last held in 2010. The following year, with a budget that increased taxes nearly 10 percent, village officials clamped down on expenses and canceled the event.

Mayor Dennis Siry sought to bring back the tradition after being elected in March, noting that there was strong interest expressed by residents.

“A lot of people have been asking about it the last couple of years,” said Roger Smith, who heads up the July 3 committee. “We thought it would be a great way to bring everybody together.”

The event previously featured fireworks, but Smith said the village’s late jump on organizing hampered attempts to procure a fireworks company.

The celebration features rides and amusements, and local vendors as well as a band. Nearby stores and restaurants have been invited to stay open late for the crowds.

Smith said the committee is still figuring out final expenses for the event, but is hopeful that donations will cover all of the costs.

The celebration takes place from 5 to 11 p.m. on Broadway between Oak Street and Ireland Place.

A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports. Credit: Newsday Staff

'Why am I giving up my Friday night to listen to this?' A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports.

A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports. Credit: Newsday Staff

'Why am I giving up my Friday night to listen to this?' A Newsday analysis shows the number of referees and umpires has declined 25.2% in Nassau and 18.1% in Suffolk since 2011-12. Officials and administrators say the main reason is spectator behavior. NewsdayTV's Carissa Kellman reports.

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