Speed cameras, like those mounted on an SUV along the eastbound...

Speed cameras, like those mounted on an SUV along the eastbound LIE between exits 49-50 in Melville last month, will start issuing fines on Wednesday.  Credit: James Carbone

Speeders beware: The warning period for New York’s first speed camera program at work zones ends Wednesday.

With the 30-day grace period over, vehicle owners going too fast will get a $50 fine in the mail.

More than 3,500 motorists received warning notices last week for speeding through 176 designated work zones across the state, according to Stephen Canzoneri, a state Department of Transportation spokesman.

Sixty drivers were traveling at speeds of 80 miles per hour or more, according to Canzoneri.

Thirty white Jeep Cherokee SUVs with cameras are deployed at various sites that are updated on a state website.

From May 15 through 19, there is only one camera activated on Long Island, on Sunrise Highway near exits 58 and 59 in Suffolk. There are currently six in Queens.

“We cannot say this enough: please respect our workers and slow down,” Canzoneri said in an email.

Locations and the durations of the mobile units will change based on work schedules, weather and priorities.

Driving 10 miles per hour or more over the speed limit will trigger a ticket that is issued within two weeks of the violation. Fines start at $50, escalate to $75 for the second violation, $100 for the third ticket and $100 fines for any additional tickets within 18 months of the first violation. Drivers will not be issued any points on their license.

Unpaid fines may result in a hold on registration until fines are paid. Fines can be contested within 30 days after citations are received.

The measure was enacted under a bill signed last year by Gov. Kathy Hochul and intended to protect workers in the field from work intrusions and car accidents.

The state will use 60% of fines collected to help pay for work zone safety projects, while the other 40% will go to the system's vendor, Verra Mobility of Roslyn Heights, officials previously said.

Automated enforcement has been controversial on Long Island. When Nassau County launched a speed camera program near schools in 2014 it was repealed after public outcry and Suffolk County canceled its program.

Suffolk County's bus camera program grossed nearly $25 million last year in its first full year of operation. Bus cameras in Hempstead issued more than 12,000 tickets from early December to February.

Speeders beware: The warning period for New York’s first speed camera program at work zones ends Wednesday.

With the 30-day grace period over, vehicle owners going too fast will get a $50 fine in the mail.

More than 3,500 motorists received warning notices last week for speeding through 176 designated work zones across the state, according to Stephen Canzoneri, a state Department of Transportation spokesman.

Sixty drivers were traveling at speeds of 80 miles per hour or more, according to Canzoneri.

Thirty white Jeep Cherokee SUVs with cameras are deployed at various sites that are updated on a state website.

From May 15 through 19, there is only one camera activated on Long Island, on Sunrise Highway near exits 58 and 59 in Suffolk. There are currently six in Queens.

“We cannot say this enough: please respect our workers and slow down,” Canzoneri said in an email.

Locations and the durations of the mobile units will change based on work schedules, weather and priorities.

Driving 10 miles per hour or more over the speed limit will trigger a ticket that is issued within two weeks of the violation. Fines start at $50, escalate to $75 for the second violation, $100 for the third ticket and $100 fines for any additional tickets within 18 months of the first violation. Drivers will not be issued any points on their license.

Unpaid fines may result in a hold on registration until fines are paid. Fines can be contested within 30 days after citations are received.

The measure was enacted under a bill signed last year by Gov. Kathy Hochul and intended to protect workers in the field from work intrusions and car accidents.

The state will use 60% of fines collected to help pay for work zone safety projects, while the other 40% will go to the system's vendor, Verra Mobility of Roslyn Heights, officials previously said.

Automated enforcement has been controversial on Long Island. When Nassau County launched a speed camera program near schools in 2014 it was repealed after public outcry and Suffolk County canceled its program.

Suffolk County's bus camera program grossed nearly $25 million last year in its first full year of operation. Bus cameras in Hempstead issued more than 12,000 tickets from early December to February.

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