Emergency personnel look for victims and fight fires in the...

Emergency personnel look for victims and fight fires in the ruins of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, after a terrorist attack leveled both buildings in Manhattan. Credit: Robert Mecea

A classified U.S. document obtained by WikiLeaks shows three previously undisclosed participants in the Sept. 11, 2001, plot, The Washington Post reports.

Three Qatari men arrived in the United States on Aug. 15, 2001, conducted surveillance of targets and left the country on the eve of the Sept. 11 attacks, according to the leaked U.S. diplomatic cable.

The three men "visited the World Trade Center, the Statue of Liberty, the White House, and various areas in Virginia" before flying on to Los Angeles, according to the leaked document.

A U.S. official said the Qataris were "looked at" within days of the attacks and that investigators concluded they could not be charged, The Post reported.

"There is no manhunt," the official was quoted as saying. "There is no active case. They were looked at, but it washed out," he was quoted as saying. The Daily Telegraph had said the FBI had begun a manhunt for the previously unknown team of men suspected to be part of the attacks.

The Post report said the three Qataris were part of a 2002 FBI list of people whom authorities wanted to interview about the Sept. 11 attacks.

After the men left the East Coast, they stayed at a hotel near the Los Angeles airport. Hotel staff later told investigators the men had "pilot-type" uniforms and computer printouts listing pilot names, airlines, flight numbers and flight times, the cable said.

Newsday Live and nextLI present a conversation with experts on the impact of powerful storms and rising insurance costs on Long Island hosted by NewsdayTV Anchor/Reporter Macy Egeland. The conversation continues on newsday.com/nextli where we invite Long Islanders to share their experiences on this looming crisis of changing weather patterns, flooding, shoreline protection, home buyouts and more to find potential solutions for the region’s future.

Paying the Price: Long Island's stormy future Newsday Live and nextLI present a conversation with experts on the impact of powerful storms and rising insurance costs on Long Island hosted by NewsdayTV Anchor/Reporter Macy Egeland.

Newsday Live and nextLI present a conversation with experts on the impact of powerful storms and rising insurance costs on Long Island hosted by NewsdayTV Anchor/Reporter Macy Egeland. The conversation continues on newsday.com/nextli where we invite Long Islanders to share their experiences on this looming crisis of changing weather patterns, flooding, shoreline protection, home buyouts and more to find potential solutions for the region’s future.

Paying the Price: Long Island's stormy future Newsday Live and nextLI present a conversation with experts on the impact of powerful storms and rising insurance costs on Long Island hosted by NewsdayTV Anchor/Reporter Macy Egeland.

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