Michael Brown's parents said Wednesday they don't believe Ferguson, Missouri, Police Officer Darren Wilson's version of the confrontation in which he shot their son to death, nor do they understand how he can proclaim his conscience is clear.

Michael Brown Sr. and his son's mother, Lesley McSpadden, appeared in interviews on "CBS This Morning" and NBC's "Today" two days after a county grand jury decided to not indict Wilson.

In newly aired segments of Wilson's interview with ABC's George Stephanopoulos, shown Wednesday on "Good Morning America," the 28-year-old officer said he "never wanted to take anybody's life" and feels sorry about Brown's death on Aug. 9. He said he understands Wilson's parents' anger because they are grieving for their 18-year-old son, and, "I'm sorry that their son lost his life."

Reacting to Wilson's assertion in an interview segment aired Tuesday that he had a clean conscience over his actions, McSpadden said, "His conscience is clear? How could your conscience be clear after killing somebody even if it was an accidental death?"

In Wilson's account to the grand jury as well as the interview, he said Brown punched him, reached into the patrol car to grapple for his gun and then came at him so menacingly that he feared for his life. Even after he shot and wounded him, Brown kept advancing at him on the street, Wilson said.

"I don't believe a word of it," McSpadden said. "I know my son is far too well . . . he would never do anything like that. He would never provoke anyone to do anything to him and he wouldn't do anything to anybody."

Brown Sr. said the officer's account "sounds crazy." He added: "For one, my son, he respected law enforcement. Two, who in their right mind would rush or charge at a police officer that has his gun drawn?"

The Brown family has not ruled out filing a wrongful-death suit. The federal government is conducting its own investigation of the shooting death of the unarmed, young black man by a white police officer. Brown's killing -- and the grand jury's decision announced Monday night -- has prompted protests nationwide.

The Rev. Al Sharpton gathered Brown's parents at his National Action Network headquarters in Harlem Wednesday alongside the families of Eric Garner and Akai Gurley, who died in separate NYPD-involved events, for a "bonding prayer."

"They share each other's pain and understand what we don't understand," Sharpton said before the families held hands and bowed their heads.

"Not only do they share the pain of being victims of police conduct, but this will be their first Thanksgiving with an empty seat at the table," he said.

Garner died July in Staten Island after a police officer placed him in an apparent chokehold. A grand jury is investigating the death.

Gurley was shot last week in Brooklyn by a rookie cop who the NYPD said accidentally discharged his weapon. The officer is on modified duty pending the investigation.

Earlier in the day, Kimberly Ballinger, Gurley's girlfriend, formally identified his body at a Brooklyn morgue.

Sharpton said he does not condone the looting and violent unrest that broke out in Ferguson on Monday night.

"Anyone that engages in violence is not on the team of justice, is not on the team of Michael Brown," he said. "You cannot confuse civil disobedience with violence."

Wilson, who remains on paid administrative leave from the Ferguson Police Department, told ABC that his life has been stressful since the shooting. He said he even grew a beard to hide his identity.

"You're always looking, you're always wondering if someone'll recognize you, if someone is following you. Just every possibility you can think of," said Wilson, who got married last month and whose wife is pregnant.

Wilson said it is unclear whether he can return to the Ferguson department. His ambition had been to spend his career there and retire as a sergeant after 30 years.

"I mean, you think they would accept me? You think it'd be safe for me?" Wilson asked.

McSpadden, Brown's mother, described her days since the grand jury decision as "sleepless, very hard, heartbreaking and unbelievable."

With Emily Ngo and

Anthony M. DeStefano

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