An approaching low-pressure system may bring the first snow to Long Island for the first weekend of 2024 — or not.

The National Weather Service said the system headed for the Mid Atlantic and Northeast will bring a 60% chance of precipitation Saturday night into Sunday.

Jase Bernhardt, director of Hofstra's programs in meteorology and sustainability, said the storm could be a “very close call” between rain or snow, depending on the temperature.

While the forecast for the storm is still developing, meteorologists say “potential is increasing for a period of moderate to heavy precipitation,” expected to bring more than a quarter-inch of snow or sleet.

“We might have a problem getting cold enough for snow, and we could have a lot of rain or sleet mixing in, which could really limit the snowfall totals,” he said.

Bryan Ramsey, meteorologist for National Weather Service, said since the storm was five days away, it's too soon to confirm anything besides precipitation.

The National Weather Service will have a better understanding of the storm by Thursday, he said. Conditions are expected to be dry Friday into Saturday.

“Unfortunately, a lot of the guidance we're looking at is not very clear,” said Ramsey. “It hasn't exactly stayed consistent yet. So it's pretty difficult to say in any detail.”

“If it is snow,” Bernhardt added, “it won't be a blockbuster” storm. But many things can change in a few days.

Long Island doesn't reach its coldest temperatures until late January, early February, and even early March, Bernhardt said.

“In terms of our snow season, we haven't really hit the meat of it yet,” he said.

Last year marked the least snowy year on record in Central Park with 2.3 inches of snow for the year. Central Park has a continuous streak of more than 650 days without receiving more than an inch of snow in one day.

Long Island had its second-lowest snowfall on record with 4.6 inches last year, according to the National Weather Service. The record fell just short of 4.5 inches of snow in Nassau and Suffolk counties in 1973, meteorologists said.

Long Island last recorded 1.8 inches of snow Feb. 27 and then recorded trace snow from flurries in November.

With John Asbury

An approaching low-pressure system may bring the first snow to Long Island for the first weekend of 2024 — or not.

The National Weather Service said the system headed for the Mid Atlantic and Northeast will bring a 60% chance of precipitation Saturday night into Sunday.

Jase Bernhardt, director of Hofstra's programs in meteorology and sustainability, said the storm could be a “very close call” between rain or snow, depending on the temperature.

While the forecast for the storm is still developing, meteorologists say “potential is increasing for a period of moderate to heavy precipitation,” expected to bring more than a quarter-inch of snow or sleet.

“We might have a problem getting cold enough for snow, and we could have a lot of rain or sleet mixing in, which could really limit the snowfall totals,” he said.

Bryan Ramsey, meteorologist for National Weather Service, said since the storm was five days away, it's too soon to confirm anything besides precipitation.

The National Weather Service will have a better understanding of the storm by Thursday, he said. Conditions are expected to be dry Friday into Saturday.

“Unfortunately, a lot of the guidance we're looking at is not very clear,” said Ramsey. “It hasn't exactly stayed consistent yet. So it's pretty difficult to say in any detail.”

“If it is snow,” Bernhardt added, “it won't be a blockbuster” storm. But many things can change in a few days.

Long Island doesn't reach its coldest temperatures until late January, early February, and even early March, Bernhardt said.

“In terms of our snow season, we haven't really hit the meat of it yet,” he said.

Last year marked the least snowy year on record in Central Park with 2.3 inches of snow for the year. Central Park has a continuous streak of more than 650 days without receiving more than an inch of snow in one day.

Long Island had its second-lowest snowfall on record with 4.6 inches last year, according to the National Weather Service. The record fell just short of 4.5 inches of snow in Nassau and Suffolk counties in 1973, meteorologists said.

Long Island last recorded 1.8 inches of snow Feb. 27 and then recorded trace snow from flurries in November.

With John Asbury

Lifesaving defibrillators at camps … Feed Me: Outdoor dining … Air quality advisory  Credit: Newsday

Shooting at Long Beach ... Lifesaving defibrillators at camps ... Early voting ... Feed Me: Outdoor dining

Lifesaving defibrillators at camps … Feed Me: Outdoor dining … Air quality advisory  Credit: Newsday

Shooting at Long Beach ... Lifesaving defibrillators at camps ... Early voting ... Feed Me: Outdoor dining

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