Flooding near Jones Beach tower Sunday.

Flooding near Jones Beach tower Sunday. Credit: Howard Schnapp

The potential for flooding will continue on Long Island Monday, forecasters said, even as Tropical Storm Henri had weakened by Sunday evening.

The inundation and torrential rain means waters from the afternoon and evening high tides may be slow in receding, according to the National Weather Service.

An earlier threat of storm surge had passed by Sunday evening, according to the weather service's final Henri briefing. "The storm surge and wind threat have come to an end," the briefing said.

With the potential for more heavy rain Monday, a "moderate" flash flood risk remains through Monday evening for the entire region, as does a flood watch. Parts of western Long Island could see as much as 2 to 4 inches of rain through Monday, the weather service said.

"We prepared for the worst and I think we got the best possible scenario," said East Hampton Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc. "We did not have a category one direct hit and right now we don’t have any significant issues."

A backside wind helped fend off the surge during high tide, Van Scoyoc said.

"A lot of it has to do with wind direction," he said. "If we get a high tide with a strong east wind, that could be a problem."

Water flooded under the Jones Beach boardwalk at high tide...

Water flooded under the Jones Beach boardwalk at high tide about 9:30 a.m. Sunday. The boardwalk was not damaged after it was redesigned following Superstorm Sandy. Credit: Howard Schnapp

The township pushed sand into the ends of Dune Road to prevent the ocean from pouring into the shorefront neighborhoods.

"I think we dodged a bullet, but we are continuing to monitor the situation," he said.

Islip Supervisor Angie Carpenter said there was flooding in Sayville, Maple Avenue in Bay Shore and a few locations in Central Islip.

"We are in full pump mode," she said, referring to the large trucks used to help remove water on flooded streets.

Water flooded under the Jones Beach boardwalk at high tide...

Water flooded under the Jones Beach boardwalk at high tide about 9:30 a.m. Sunday. The boardwalk was not damaged after it was redesigned following Superstorm Sandy. Credit: Howard Schnapp

"As much as we were out there preparing and making sure the storm drains were cleared," Carpenter said, "when the water comes at this volume there is just no place for it to go."

On the North Shore, Bayville Mayor Robert De Natale said flooding continued to be a problem Sunday afternoon on private roads without proper drainage, but he didn't blame storm surge from Long Island Sound.

"It is rainwater," Natale said, "not seawater."

A state of emergency for the village declared Saturday will remain in place until 7 p.m. Monday.

State parks officials reported extensive flooding Sunday morning at Jones Beach State Park, with rising water from Field 2 to Field 6, and at the West Bathhouse up to the sea wall, said George Gorman, regional director of Long Island state parks.

Water flooded under the Jones Beach boardwalk at high tide, although it later receded and the boardwalk was undamaged.

All of Long Island's state parks were closed during the storm. The Fire Island inlet bridge was closed, but Robert Moses Causeway and Wantagh State Parkway were open.

Ryan Murphy, public safety and emergency management administrator for the Town of Southampton, was hopeful that any flooding would be manageable.

"We have gone through the morning high tide cycle and the afternoon high tide cycle and made it through those," he said.

Murphy said Ponquogue Bridge in Hampton Bays was closed as was a large portion of Dune Road in the vicinity. The bridge was open for commercial fisherman who had to check on their fleet.

"Up in the Peconic Bay and Flanders Bay, we are very happy with what we are seeing right now," he said. "This is not much more than we would typically see in a nor’easter."

Southold Supervisor Scott Russell said the town "made out just fine."

"There's no significant flooding," the supervisor said, adding he wasn't concerned about the evening high tide.

In Mastic Beach, some streets were under several inches of water, but the flooding appeared to be less than predicted.

Pat Jacobsen, 78, who has lived near Narrow Bay for 50 years, said the storm passed by with a whimper after some officials warned of flooding like during Superstorm Sandy.

"This is nothing. We have flooded roads here when there are no storms," Jacobsen said standing outside her home. "This is an everyday storm."

She said she had just returned from vacation and had feared a repeat of Superstorm Sandy. She said she was relieved that Henri passed by Eastern Long Island and the South Shore.

"I think everybody needed to be put on alert," Jacobsen said. "If it was worse, it could’ve been a disaster."

Latest Videos