Sunny skies and a craft and gift fair drew people...

Sunny skies and a craft and gift fair drew people — and dogs — to Eisenhower Park on Sunday. Credit: Morgan Campbell

Forecasters are predicting hot and humid conditions on Long Island with temperatures hitting the lower 90s later in the week as a heat wave makes its way through the Northeast.

Temperatures are expected to begin rising Monday, with a high of 81 degrees, dropping to 67 at night. Tuesday will reach 87, and the Juneteenth holiday Wednesday could reach 88, with a heat index reaching 90.

The first day of summer on Thursday will be hot, with temperatures forecast to reach the 90s across much of the Island, according to David Stark, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Upton.

The heat index Thursday could reach 95 or even 100 degrees, he said Sunday.

The heat index, also known as the apparent temperature, is what the temperature feels like to the human body when relative humidity is combined with the air temperature.

Parts of the New York, Connecticut and New Jersey will see heat index temperatures in the upper 90s and low 100s during the middle of the week, according to the weather service.

The Centers for Disease Control advises that children, older adults and people who work outdoors are especially vulnerable to the effects of heat, and staying hydrated with plain water and remaining indoors or in the shade can reduce the risks. 

Friday will offer more of the same, with a few degrees cooler toward the East End, Stark said. Temperatures are expected to be near 93 degrees, the weather service said.

A high temperature of around 88 degrees is expected Saturday.

For those heading to the beaches, the weather service said the rip tide risk in Nassau and Suffolk counties will be moderate Monday and Tuesday. 

The hot weather in the first week after the summer solstice doesn’t necessarily mean that the whole summer will be especially hot.

“It’s not unusual to see an early heat wave in June,” Stark said. “It really doesn’t have any bearing on the rest of the summer.”

But the summer is nevertheless expected to warmer than normal, the weather service predicts. While there may not be heat waves, Stark said, “temperatures as a whole will be above the average” for June, July and August.

With Darwin Yanes

Get the latest news and more great videos at NewsdayTV Credit: Newsday

Trump picks his VP . . . Documents case tossed . . . Play places for kids . . . Prime Day is coming 

Get the latest news and more great videos at NewsdayTV Credit: Newsday

Trump picks his VP . . . Documents case tossed . . . Play places for kids . . . Prime Day is coming 

YOU'VE BEEN SELECTED

FOR OUR BEST OFFER ONLY 25¢ for 5 months

Unlimited Digital Access.

cancel anytime.