Dan Panico, Town of Brookhaven supervisor-elect, speaks at the Suffolk...

Dan Panico, Town of Brookhaven supervisor-elect, speaks at the Suffolk GOP Republican headquarters at Stereo Garden in Patchogue on Tuesday. Credit: Steve Pfost

Newly elected supervisors in Suffolk County towns began to map out their agendas Wednesday with a focus on affordable housing, water quality and coastal resiliency.

Brookhaven Republicans maintained their 6-1 majority on the town board following Tuesday's election, while new supervisors were elected across the East End, including Southold where a new supervisor will take over for the first time in nearly two decades, according to unofficial results from the Suffolk County Board of Elections.

Dan Panico, a current Brookhaven councilman and deputy supervisor who was elected to replace Ed Romaine, said early Wednesday he will focus on quality-of-life issues.

“We’re going to set a course for the preservation of our open spaces, and we are going to work with our newly elected county executive on the makings of a regional solid waste plan,” he said.

Closing the town landfill will remain “on schedule,” starting late next year, Panico said.

Republican Karen Dunne Kesnig was elected in Brookhaven’s 6th District to succeed Panico. She defeated Democrat Kerry Spooner. The incumbents won the remaining five district races.

Republicans made a clean sweep in Riverhead, winning every town race on the ballot.

Councilman Tim Hubbard was elected town supervisor over Democratic challenger Angela DeVito.

“I’m elated. It’s such an honor that the people of the Town of Riverhead supported me," Hubbard said Wednesday.

Republicans Denise Merrifield and Joann Waski won two seats on the town board.

Democrats, meanwhile, swept every town race in East Hampton.

Kathee Burke-Gonzalez will become the fourth woman elected supervisor in the town’s 375-year history.

“Those of us with daughters know that representation matters,” she said Wednesday, calling the victory “really meaningful.”

Councilman David Lys won reelection on the town board and will be joined by fellow Democrat Tom Flight, a school board member in Montauk.

Southold residents elected Democrat County Legis. Al Krupski Jr., a Cutchogue farmer, to replace longtime Republican leader Scott Russell. Krupski earned a decisive victory over Republican Don Grim.

Krupski said Wednesday he’s eager to work on issues like affordable housing, zoning and coastal resiliency. 

“I live here, and it’s really such a special place,” he said.

For town board, Democrat Anne Smith, a former school superintendent, was leading with 26% of the votes followed by incumbent Republican Jill Doherty with just under 26%, unofficial vote tallies showed.

Democrat Maria Moore, the mayor of Westhampton Beach, was elected supervisor in Southampton Town to replace term-limited Jay Schneiderman. Moore defeated Republican Councilwoman Cynthia McNamara.

Democrat Bill Pell, a town trustee, was elected to the town board with 29% of the votes, and fellow Democrat Michael Iasilli was leading for the second seat with 25%. Incumbent Republican Richard Martel was on the verge of losing his seat with 24% of the votes.

The tightest supervisor race was on Shelter Island where Republican Councilwoman Amber Brach-Williams held a narrow advantage, with just under 50% of the votes compared with 47% for Democrat Arnott Gooding.

Brach-Williams had not yet declared victory as of midday Wednesday, according to GOP chairman Gary Blados, as they awaited confirmation of absentee ballots.

Betty Manzella, the Republican board of elections commissioner, said Shelter Island has 83 absentee ballots outstanding, which must be received by Nov. 14, or Nov. 20 for military. Any absentee ballots received by Nov. 5 were included in the unofficial results, she added.

Islip Supervisor Angie Carpenter, a Republican and the only incumbent supervisor seeking reelection, defeated her challenger to remain at the post she's held since 2015.

In the council races, local business owner Michael McElwee beat former state Assemb. Christine Pellegrino to represent Islip’s 3rd district. 

Incumbent John Lorenzo also survived his first election to represent Islip's 4th district. The town board appointed Lorenzo earlier this year to fill a vacant seat, a decision that was contested by future opponent Thomas Murray III at the time. 

Both elected councilmen are Republicans. 

In Huntington, the town board will be under one-party rule for the first time since 2009 as Republicans Brooke Lupinacci and Theresa Mari declared victory against Democrats Jen Hebert and Don McKay in a tight four-way race for two seats.

Huntington Republican chair Tom McNally said he was confident the numbers would hold for the Republicans.

"The people have spoken, and the results are clear and they'll stand up," he said.

With Brianne Ledda, Carl MacGowan, Deborah S. Morris and Tara Smith

Newly elected supervisors in Suffolk County towns began to map out their agendas Wednesday with a focus on affordable housing, water quality and coastal resiliency.

Brookhaven Republicans maintained their 6-1 majority on the town board following Tuesday's election, while new supervisors were elected across the East End, including Southold where a new supervisor will take over for the first time in nearly two decades, according to unofficial results from the Suffolk County Board of Elections.

Dan Panico, a current Brookhaven councilman and deputy supervisor who was elected to replace Ed Romaine, said early Wednesday he will focus on quality-of-life issues.

“We’re going to set a course for the preservation of our open spaces, and we are going to work with our newly elected county executive on the makings of a regional solid waste plan,” he said.

Closing the town landfill will remain “on schedule,” starting late next year, Panico said.

Republican Karen Dunne Kesnig was elected in Brookhaven’s 6th District to succeed Panico. She defeated Democrat Kerry Spooner. The incumbents won the remaining five district races.

Republicans made a clean sweep in Riverhead, winning every town race on the ballot.

Councilman Tim Hubbard was elected town supervisor over Democratic challenger Angela DeVito.

“I’m elated. It’s such an honor that the people of the Town of Riverhead supported me," Hubbard said Wednesday.

Republicans Denise Merrifield and Joann Waski won two seats on the town board.

Democrats, meanwhile, swept every town race in East Hampton.

Kathee Burke-Gonzalez will become the fourth woman elected supervisor in the town’s 375-year history.

“Those of us with daughters know that representation matters,” she said Wednesday, calling the victory “really meaningful.”

Councilman David Lys won reelection on the town board and will be joined by fellow Democrat Tom Flight, a school board member in Montauk.

Southold residents elected Democrat County Legis. Al Krupski Jr., a Cutchogue farmer, to replace longtime Republican leader Scott Russell. Krupski earned a decisive victory over Republican Don Grim.

Krupski said Wednesday he’s eager to work on issues like affordable housing, zoning and coastal resiliency. 

“I live here, and it’s really such a special place,” he said.

For town board, Democrat Anne Smith, a former school superintendent, was leading with 26% of the votes followed by incumbent Republican Jill Doherty with just under 26%, unofficial vote tallies showed.

Democrat Maria Moore, the mayor of Westhampton Beach, was elected supervisor in Southampton Town to replace term-limited Jay Schneiderman. Moore defeated Republican Councilwoman Cynthia McNamara.

Democrat Bill Pell, a town trustee, was elected to the town board with 29% of the votes, and fellow Democrat Michael Iasilli was leading for the second seat with 25%. Incumbent Republican Richard Martel was on the verge of losing his seat with 24% of the votes.

The tightest supervisor race was on Shelter Island where Republican Councilwoman Amber Brach-Williams held a narrow advantage, with just under 50% of the votes compared with 47% for Democrat Arnott Gooding.

Brach-Williams had not yet declared victory as of midday Wednesday, according to GOP chairman Gary Blados, as they awaited confirmation of absentee ballots.

Betty Manzella, the Republican board of elections commissioner, said Shelter Island has 83 absentee ballots outstanding, which must be received by Nov. 14, or Nov. 20 for military. Any absentee ballots received by Nov. 5 were included in the unofficial results, she added.

Islip Supervisor Angie Carpenter, a Republican and the only incumbent supervisor seeking reelection, defeated her challenger to remain at the post she's held since 2015.

In the council races, local business owner Michael McElwee beat former state Assemb. Christine Pellegrino to represent Islip’s 3rd district. 

Incumbent John Lorenzo also survived his first election to represent Islip's 4th district. The town board appointed Lorenzo earlier this year to fill a vacant seat, a decision that was contested by future opponent Thomas Murray III at the time. 

Both elected councilmen are Republicans. 

In Huntington, the town board will be under one-party rule for the first time since 2009 as Republicans Brooke Lupinacci and Theresa Mari declared victory against Democrats Jen Hebert and Don McKay in a tight four-way race for two seats.

Huntington Republican chair Tom McNally said he was confident the numbers would hold for the Republicans.

"The people have spoken, and the results are clear and they'll stand up," he said.

With Brianne Ledda, Carl MacGowan, Deborah S. Morris and Tara Smith

Get the latest news and more great videos at NewsdayTV Credit: Newsday

Newsday's political experts breakdown what's next for Dems ... Suffolk cybersecurity ... Cleaning up the beaches ... Sunflower fields

Get the latest news and more great videos at NewsdayTV Credit: Newsday

Newsday's political experts breakdown what's next for Dems ... Suffolk cybersecurity ... Cleaning up the beaches ... Sunflower fields

YOU'VE BEEN SELECTED

FOR OUR BEST OFFER ONLY 25¢ for 5 months

Unlimited Digital Access.

cancel anytime.